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sinonimi di take
Cerca  frasi:
Italiano
Vocabolario e frasi
espiantare
= verbo trans . prelevare chirurgicamente un organo o un tessuto per trapiantarlo altrove . <>
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fiorentina
= bistecca alla fiorentina lucerna metallica costituita di un fusto e tre becchi
= 3 recipiente a forma di boccia - o di anfora con due aperture contrapposte a livello diverso da cui è possibile prelevare separatamente due liquidi che non si mescolano . <>
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pipetta
= diminutivo di pipa - piccolo tubo di vetro , talvolta graduato , mediante il quale è possibile prelevare per aspirazione piccole quantità di liquido .<>
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prelevamento
= il prelevare , l'essere prelevato<>
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saggiavino
= in enologia , tubetto di vetro con un rigonfiamento a un'estremità , usato per prelevare del vino da una botte per le prove di assaggio . <>
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Inglese
Vocabolario e frasi
Long says that Netherfield is takenby a young man of large fortune from the north of England; that he camedown on Monday in a chaise and four to see the place, and was so muchdelighted with it, that he agreed with Mr. Morris immediately; that heis to take possession before Michaelmas, and some of his servants are tobe in the house by the end of next week.<>
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Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.<>
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But to be candid without ostentation or design--to take thegood of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothingof the bad--belongs to you alone.<>
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Bennet; "and if I were to see you at it, I should take away your bottledirectly.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But I would really advise you to make your purchase in thatneighbourhood, and take Pemberley for a kind of model.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seenthrough I am afraid is pitiful.<>
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Inthe desperation of her feelings, she resolved on one effort more, and,turning to Elizabeth, said:"Miss Eliza Bennet, let me persuade you to follow my example, and take aturn about the room.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) By tea-time, however, the dose had been enough, and Mr. Bennet was gladto take his guest into the drawing-room again, and, when tea was over,glad to invite him to read aloud to the ladies.<>
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"As toher younger daughters, she could not take upon her to say--she couldnot positively answer--but she did not know of any prepossession; hereldest daughter, she must just mention--she felt it incumbent on herto hint, was likely to be very soon engaged.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I should take him, even on my slight acquaintance, to be anill-tempered man.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I know very well, madam," said he, "that when persons sit down to acard-table, they must take their chances of these things, and happily Iam not in such circumstances as to make five shillings any object.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I am by no means of the opinion, I assure you," said he, "that a ballof this kind, given by a young man of character, to respectable people,can have any evil tendency; and I am so far from objecting to dancingmyself, that I shall hope to be honoured with the hands of all my faircousins in the course of the evening; and I take this opportunity ofsoliciting yours, Miss Elizabeth, for the two first dances especially,a preference which I trust my cousin Jane will attribute to the rightcause, and not to any disrespect for her.<>
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Elizabeth, however, did not chooseto take the hint, being well aware that a serious dispute must be theconsequence of any reply.<>
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Allow me to say, however, that your fair partner does notdisgrace you, and that I must hope to have this pleasure often repeated,especially when a certain desirable event, my dear Eliza (glancing ather sister and Bingley) shall take place.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But if I do not take your likeness now, I may never have anotheropportunity.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) When at length they arose to take leave, Mrs.<>
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In making me the offer, you must have satisfied the delicacy of yourfeelings with regard to my family, and may take possession of Longbournestate whenever it falls, without any self-reproach.<>
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My situation in life, my connectionswith the family of de Bourgh, and my relationship to your own, arecircumstances highly in my favour; and you should take it into furtherconsideration, that in spite of your manifold attractions, it is by nomeans certain that another offer of marriage may ever be made you.<>
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But I tell you, Miss Lizzy--if you take itinto your head to go on refusing every offer of marriage in this way,you will never get a husband at all--and I am sure I do not know who isto maintain you when your father is dead.<>
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You could not have started a more happy idea, since youwill not take comfort in mine.<>
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Afterlamenting it, however, at some length, she had the consolation that Mr.Bingley would be soon down again and soon dining at Longbourn, and theconclusion of all was the comfortable declaration, that though he hadbeen invited only to a family dinner, she would take care to have twofull courses.<>
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Risk anything rather than herdispleasure; and if you find it likely to be raised by your coming to usagain, which I should think exceedingly probable, stay quietly at home,and be satisfied that we shall take no offence.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Indeed, Mr. Bennet," said she, "it is very hard to think that CharlotteLucas should ever be mistress of this house, that I should be forced tomake way for her, and live to see her take her place in it!""My dear, do not give way to such gloomy thoughts.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "And men take care that they should.<>
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Let me take it inthe best light, in the light in which it may be understood.<>
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I will take care ofmyself, and of Mr. Wickham too.<>
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" Thursday was to be the wedding day,and on Wednesday Miss Lucas paid her farewell visit; and when sherose to take leave, Elizabeth, ashamed of her mother's ungracious andreluctant good wishes, and sincerely affected herself, accompanied herout of the room.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "My aunt," she continued, "is going to-morrow into that part of thetown, and I shall take the opportunity of calling in Grosvenor Street.<>
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After sitting long enough toadmire every article of furniture in the room, from the sideboard tothe fender, to give an account of their journey, and of all that hadhappened in London, Mr. Collins invited them to take a stroll in thegarden, which was large and well laid out, and to the cultivation ofwhich he attended himself.<>
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James's Sir William was so completelyawed by the grandeur surrounding him, that he had but just courageenough to make a very low bow, and take his seat without saying a word;and his daughter, frightened almost out of her senses, sat on the edgeof her chair, not knowing which way to look.<>
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But hercommendation, though costing her some trouble, could by no means satisfyMr. Collins, and he was very soon obliged to take her ladyship's praiseinto his own hands.<>
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But then Ihave always supposed it to be my own fault--because I will not take thetrouble of practising.<>
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Elizabeth receivedthem with all the forbearance of civility, and, at the request of thegentlemen, remained at the instrument till her ladyship's carriage wasready to take them all home.<>
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But, perhaps, Mr. Bingley didnot take the house so much for the convenience of the neighbourhood asfor his own, and we must expect him to keep it or quit it on the sameprinciple.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Care of him! Yes, I really believe Darcy does take care of him inthose points where he most wants care.<>
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On this subject, what can you have tosay? In what imaginary act of friendship can you here defend yourself?or under what misrepresentation can you here impose upon others?""You take an eager interest in that gentleman's concerns," said Darcy,in a less tranquil tone, and with a heightened colour.<>
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And if you will stayanother month complete, it will be in my power to take one of you asfar as London, for I am going there early in June, for a week; and asDawson does not object to the barouche-box, there will be very good roomfor one of you--and indeed, if the weather should happen to be cool, Ishould not object to taking you both, as you are neither of you large.<>
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"And then," said she, "if that veryimprobable event should ever take place, I shall merely be able totell what Bingley may tell in a much more agreeable manner himself.<>
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If you, my dearfather, will not take the trouble of checking her exuberant spirits, andof teaching her that her present pursuits are not to be the business ofher life, she will soon be beyond the reach of amendment.<>
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Gardiner's coming up they were all pressed to gointo the house and take some refreshment; but this was declined, andthey parted on each side with utmost politeness.<>
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"Your great men often are; and therefore I shall not take himat his word, as he might change his mind another day, and warn me offhis grounds.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) The next variation which their visit afforded was produced by theentrance of servants with cold meat, cake, and a variety of all thefinest fruits in season; but this did not take place till after manya significant look and smile from Mrs.<>
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Is there nothing you could take to give youpresent relief? A glass of wine; shall I get you one? You are very ill.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "If I had been able," said she, "to carry my point in going to Brighton,with all my family, this would not have happened; but poor dear Lydiahad nobody to take care of her.<>
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If you are a goodgirl for the next ten years, I will take you to a review at the end ofthem.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "May we take my uncle's letter to read to her?""Take whatever you like, and get away.<>
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Bennet, before you take any or all of these houses for your son anddaughter, let us come to a right understanding.<>
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She then joined them soon enough to see Lydia, withanxious parade, walk up to her mother's right hand, and hear her sayto her eldest sister, "Ah! Jane, I take your place now, and you must golower, because I am a married woman.<>
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Weshall be at Newcastle all the winter, and I dare say there will be someballs, and I will take care to get good partners for them all.<>
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Will you be very angry with me, mydear Lizzy, if I take this opportunity of saying (what I was never boldenough to say before) how much I like him.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I almost envy you the pleasure, and yet I believe it would be too muchfor me, or else I could take it in my way to Newcastle.<>
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"It must be something particular, to take him there at thistime of year.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "You are quite a visit in my debt, Mr. Bingley," she added, "for whenyou went to town last winter, you promised to take a family dinner withus, as soon as you returned.<>
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; and if she wouldgive him leave, would take an early opportunity of waiting on them.<>
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Bennet assured her that they never sat there after dinner, and thenadded:"May I take the liberty of asking your ladyship whether you left Mr. andMrs.<>
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Bennet, with great civility, begged her ladyship to take somerefreshment; but Lady Catherine very resolutely, and not very politely,declined eating anything; and then, rising up, said to Elizabeth,"Miss Bennet, there seemed to be a prettyish kind of a little wildernesson one side of your lawn.<>
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I should be glad to take a turn in it, if youwill favour me with your company.<>
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This match, to which you have thepresumption to aspire, can never take place.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) In this manner Lady Catherine talked on, till they were at the door ofthe carriage, when, turning hastily round, she added, "I take no leaveof you, Miss Bennet.<>
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From what she had said of her resolution toprevent their marriage, it occurred to Elizabeth that she must meditatean application to her nephew; and how he might take a similarrepresentation of the evils attached to a connection with her, she darednot pronounce.<>
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Yet in spite of all these temptations, let me warn my cousinElizabeth, and yourself, of what evils you may incur by a precipitateclosure with this gentleman's proposals, which, of course, you will beinclined to take immediate advantage of.<>
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Let me thank you again and again,in the name of all my family, for that generous compassion which inducedyou to take so much trouble, and bear so many mortifications, for thesake of discovering them.<>
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She could not determine how her motherwould take it; sometimes doubting whether all his wealth and grandeurwould be enough to overcome her abhorrence of the man.<>
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By Elizabeth's instructions, she began to comprehend thata woman may take liberties with her husband which a brother will notalways allow in a sister more than ten years younger than himself.<>
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) He would take the assertion of that honourablePickwickian whose voice he had just heard--it was celebrated; but ifthe fame of that treatise were to extend to the farthest confines of theknown world, the pride with which he should reflect on the authorship ofthat production would be as nothing compared with the pride with whichhe looked around him, on this, the proudest moment of his existence.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'What did you take it for, then?' inquired the cabman.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I didn't take it,' said Mr. Pickwick indignantly.<>
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Here, No. 924,take your fare, and take yourself off--respectable gentleman--know himwell--none of your nonsense--this way, sir--where's your friends?--alla mistake, I see--never mind--accidents will happen--best regulatedfamilies--never say die--down upon your luck--Pull him UP--Put thatin his pipe--like the flavour--damned rascals.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Here, waiter!' shouted the stranger, ringing the bell with tremendousviolence, 'glasses round--brandy-and-water, hot and strong, andsweet, and plenty,--eye damaged, Sir? Waiter! raw beef-steak for thegentleman's eye--nothing like raw beef-steak for a bruise, sir; coldlamp-post very good, but lamp-post inconvenient--damned odd standingin the open street half an hour, with your eye against alamp-post--eh,--very good--ha! ha!' And the stranger, without stoppingto take breath, swallowed at a draught full half a pint of the reekingbrandy-and-water, and flung himself into a chair with as much ease as ifnothing uncommon had occurred.<>
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The temptation to take the stranger with him was equally great.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Wanted!' said Mr. Winkle, hastily jumping out of bed, and putting ona few articles of clothing; 'wanted! at this distance from town--who onearth can want me?Gentleman in the coffee-room, sir,' replied the Boots, as Mr. Winkleopened the door and confronted him; 'gentleman says he'll not detain youa moment, Sir, but he can take no denial.<>
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If you will take the trouble to turn into the field which borders thetrench, take the foot-path to the left when you arrive at an angle ofthe fortification, and keep straight on, till you see me, I will precedeyou to a secluded place, where the affair can be conducted without fearof interruption.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Snodgrass,' he said, stopping suddenly, 'do not let me be balked inthis matter--do not give information to the local authorities--do notobtain the assistance of several peace officers, to take either me orDoctor Slammer, of the 97th Regiment, at present quartered in ChathamBarracks, into custody, and thus prevent this duel!--I say, do not.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Everything,' replied Mr. Snodgrass; 'plenty of ammunition, in case theshots don't take effect.<>
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A grand review was to take place upon thelines.<>
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Mr. Pickwick,perceiving his advantage, darted briskly forward, secured his property,planted it on his head, and paused to take breath.<>
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--'Hem! aunt, dear!Yes, my dear love!I'm SO afraid you'll catch cold, aunt--have a silk handkerchief totie round your dear old head--you really should take care ofyourself--consider your age!'However well deserved this piece of retaliation might have been, it wasas vindictive a one as could well have been resorted to.<>
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As thePickwickians turned round to take a last glimpse of it, the setting suncast a rich glow on the faces of their entertainers, and fell upon theform of the fat boy.<>
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Joe--he's asleepagain!--Joe, take that horse from the gentlemen, and lead it into thestable.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Friend of yours!--My dear sir, how are you?--Friend of myfriend's--give me your hand, sir'--and the stranger grasped Mr. Wardle'shand with all the fervour of a close intimacy of many years, and thenstepped back a pace or two as if to take a full survey of his face andfigure, and then shook hands with him again, if possible, more warmlythan before.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You will take cold in the evening air,' urged the spinster auntaffectionately.<>
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You'll take somebody else?' 'Yes.<>
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I'll take care,' said Mr. Tupman aloud.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'And I'LL take care,' said Mr. Jingle internally; and they entered thehouse.<>
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Mr. Winkle, take your hands off.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) So sending forward one of the boys on horseback, to procure a freshchaise and horses, and leaving the other behind to take care of thebroken one, Mr. Pickwick and Mr. Wardle set manfully forward on thewalk, first tying their shawls round their necks, and slouching downtheir hats to escape as much as possible from the deluge of rain, whichafter a slight cessation had again begun to pour heavily down.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Here, clean these shoes for number seventeen directly, and take 'em toprivate sitting-room, number five, first floor.<>
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"Pray take a seat, vile I makes outthe affidavit, Sir," says the lawyer.<>
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She's her own mistress--see whodares to take her away--unless she wishes it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, my dear sir--you don't take snuff!--ah! so much thebetter--expensive habit--well, my dear Sir, you're a fine young man, manof the world--able to push your fortune, if you had capital, eh?Well,' said Mr. Jingle again.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) It was a more difficult task to take leave of the inmates of ManorFarm, from whom they had received so much hospitality and kindness.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll give you ten shillings for it, at once,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'ifyou would take it up for me.<>
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Bardell; 'and, of course, I should take more trouble to please youthen, than ever; but it is so kind of you, Mr. Pickwick, to have so muchconsideration for my loneliness.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I wish, my dear, you would endeavour to find some topic of conversationin which these gentlemen might take some rational interest.<>
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I'll take care,' said the Honourable Samuel Slumkey.<>
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"What will you take for breakfast,sir?"'Tom was thinking how he should open the case, so he made no answer.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'The widow began to think it was high time to cry, so she took out herhandkerchief, and inquired whether Tom wished to insult her, whetherhe thought it like a gentleman to take away the character of anothergentleman behind his back, why, if he had got anything to say, he didn'tsay it to the man, like a man, instead of terrifying a poor weak womanin that way; and so forth.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'My attachment to your person, sir,' said Mr. Tupman, speaking in avoice tremulous with emotion, and tucking up his wristbands meanwhile,'is great--very great--but upon that person, I must take summaryvengeance.<>
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Leo Hunter's recitation ofher far-famed 'Ode to an Expiring Frog,' which was encored once, andwould have been encored twice, if the major part of the guests, whothought it was high time to get something to eat, had not said that itwas perfectly shameful to take advantage of Mrs.<>
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Leo Hunter's usual course of proceedings being, to issuecards for a hundred, and breakfast for fifty, or in other words to feedonly the very particular lions, and let the smaller animals take care ofthemselves.<>
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The offender hadbarely time to take Mrs.<>
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Will you take a drop o'somethin' this mornin', Mr. Trotter?'Mr. Trotter acquiesced in this agreeable proposal; and having depositedhis book in his coat pocket, accompanied Mr. Weller to the tap, wherethey were soon occupied in discussing an exhilarating compound, formedby mixing together, in a pewter vessel, certain quantities of BritishHollands and the fragrant essence of the clove.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, and don't you think, old feller,' remonstrated Mr. Weller, 'thatif you let your master take in this here young lady, you're a preciousrascal?I know that,' said Job Trotter, turning upon his companion acountenance of deep contrition, and groaning slightly, 'I know that, andthat's what it is that preys upon my mind.<>
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If I knew any respectable gentleman who would take the matter up,'continued Mr. Trotter.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'And when,' said Mr. Pickwick--'when is this villainous design to becarried into execution--when is this elopement to take place?To-night, Sir,' replied Job.<>
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On the third, being able tosit up in his bedchamber, he despatched his valet with a message to Mr.Wardle and Mr. Trundle, intimating that if they would take their winethere, that evening, they would greatly oblige him.<>
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No wonder then, that Nathaniel Pipkin was unable to take hiseyes from the countenance of Miss Lobbs; no wonder that Miss Lobbs,finding herself stared at by a young man, withdrew her head from thewindow out of which she had been peeping, and shut the casement andpulled down the blind; no wonder that Nathaniel Pipkin, immediatelythereafter, fell upon the young urchin who had previously offended, andcuffed and knocked him about to his heart's content.<>
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"'"Why, you snivelling, wry-faced, puny villain," gasped old Lobbs,paralysed by the atrocious confession; "what do you mean by that? Saythis to my face! Damme, I'll throttle you!"'It is by no means improbable that old Lobbs would have carried histhreat into execution, in the excess of his rage, if his arm had notbeen stayed by a very unexpected apparition: to wit, the male cousin,who, stepping out of his closet, and walking up to old Lobbs, said--'"I cannot allow this harmless person, Sir, who has been asked here, insome girlish frolic, to take upon himself, in a very noble manner, thefault (if fault it is) which I am guilty of, and am ready to avow.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'And what steps, sir, do you mean to take to obtain redress?' inquiredMr. Winkle, gaining courage as he saw Pott losing it.<>
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Next day is the first of September, and you're pledged to ride out withus, as far as Sir Geoffrey Manning's grounds at all events, and to meetus at lunch, if you don't take the field.<>
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I saw you do it--I observed you pick him out--Inoticed you, as you raised your piece to take aim; and I will say this,that the best shot in existence could not have done it more beautifully.<>
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And a wery good notion of a lunch it is, take it altogether,' said Mr.Weller, surveying his arrangement of the repast with great satisfaction.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Pickwick had not been asleep half an hour when little CaptainBoldwig, followed by the two gardeners, came striding along as fast ashis size and importance would let him; and when he came near the oaktree, Captain Boldwig paused and drew a long breath, and looked at theprospect as if he thought the prospect ought to be highly gratifiedat having him to take notice of it; and then he struck the groundemphatically with his stick, and summoned the head-gardener.<>
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And take care that you keep this place in good order--do you hear,Hunt?Yes, Sir.<>
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Then, he would bury in a quart pot, as much of his countenance as thedimensions of the quart pot admitted of its receiving, and take anotherlook at Sam and Mr. Pickwick.<>
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Then he would take another half-dozenpuffs with an air of profound meditation and look at them again.<>
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But don't hurryaway, Mr. Weller; won't you take anything?You're wery good, Sir,' replied Mr. W.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I have been to-night, gentlemen,' said Mr. Pickwick, hoping to start asubject which all the company could take a part in discussing, 'I havebeen to-night, in a place which you all know very well, doubtless, butwhich I have not been in for some years, and know very little of; Imean Gray's Inn, gentlemen.<>
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He was obliged to take somemouldering fixtures that were on the place, and, among the rest, was agreat lumbering wooden press for papers, with large glass doors, anda green curtain inside; a pretty useless thing for him, for he had nopapers to put in it; and as to his clothes, he carried them about withhim, and that wasn't very hard work, either.<>
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"Ah,"says he, "if I hadn't been obliged to take that ugly article at theold broker's valuation, I might have got something comfortable for themoney.<>
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"Be revenged; take my all, my life; cast me into thewater at your feet, and, if human nature can repress a struggle, I willdie, without stirring hand or foot.<>
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The factis, he is my servant, but I allow him to take a good many liberties;for, between ourselves, I flatter myself he is an original, and I amrather proud of him.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I could take my oath to that 'ere black hair and mulberry suit,' saidMr. Weller; 'only I never see such a face as that afore.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Take care, Job Trotter, take care,' said Sam, looking after him, 'orI shall be one too many for you this time.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Unworthiness for HER only, mind, sir,' resumed Mr. Pickwick; 'for toshow that I was not wholly unworthy, sir, I should take a brief reviewof my past life, and present condition.<>
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I think I should kiss her, Mr. Magnus; and at thisparticular point, I am decidedly of opinion that if the lady were goingto take me at all, she would murmur into my ears a bashful acceptance.<>
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When I assure him, in your presence,that it has no relation to himself, and is not in any way connected withhis affairs, I need hardly beg you to take notice that if he continue todispute it, he expresses a doubt of my veracity, which I shall considerextremely insulting.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The hungry-looking Jinks sighed, as if he were quite aware of the factof his having very little indeed to be merry about; and, being orderedto take the lady's information, shambled to a seat, and proceeded towrite it down.<>
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He conferred a few momentswith Mr. Tupman apart, and then signified his readiness to proceedto the mayor's residence, merely begging the parties then and thereassembled, to take notice, that it was his firm intention to resent thismonstrous invasion of his privileges as an Englishman, the instant hewas at liberty; whereat the parties then and there assembled laughedvery heartily, with the single exception of Mr. Grummer, who seemed toconsider that any slight cast upon the divine right of magistrates was aspecies of blasphemy not to be tolerated.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Whether Mr. Winkle was seized with a temporary attack of that speciesof insanity which originates in a sense of injury, or animated by thisdisplay of Mr. Weller's valour, is uncertain; but certain it is, thathe no sooner saw Mr. Grummer fall than he made a terrific onslaught ona small boy who stood next him; whereupon Mr. Snodgrass, in a trulyChristian spirit, and in order that he might take no one unawares,announced in a very loud tone that he was going to begin, and proceededto take off his coat with the utmost deliberation.<>
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At length,with the assistance of Mr. Tupman, he managed to push open the roof;and mounting on the seat, and steadying himself as well as he could, byplacing his hand on that gentleman's shoulder, Mr. Pickwick proceeded toaddress the multitude; to dwell upon the unjustifiable manner in whichhe had been treated; and to call upon them to take notice that hisservant had been first assaulted.<>
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You may order your officers to do whatever you please, Sir,' said Mr.Pickwick; 'and I have no doubt, from the specimen I have had of thesubordination preserved amongst them, that whatever you order, they willexecute, Sir; but I shall take the liberty, Sir, of claiming my right tobe heard, until I am removed by force.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Pickwick,' said the magistrate, 'dear me, Mr. Pickwick--pray take aseat--you cannot mean this? Captain Fitz-Marshall!Don't call him a cap'en,' said Sam, 'nor Fitz-Marshall neither; heain't neither one nor t'other.<>
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Mr. Jinks, take his words down.<>
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Nupkins; 'how Ihave implored and begged that man to inquire into the captain's familyconnections; how I have urged and entreated him to take some decisivestep! I am quite certain nobody would believe it--quite.<>
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So Mr. Pickwick and his friends, having washed off allmarks of their late encounter, were introduced to the ladies, and soonafterwards to their dinner; and Mr. Weller, whom the magistrate, withhis peculiar sagacity, had discovered in half an hour to be one of thefinest fellows alive, was consigned to the care and guardianship of Mr.Muzzle, who was specially enjoined to take him below, and make much ofhim.<>
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You'll lose it again,if you don't take care.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I could send them to Mr. Tupman's, for the present, Sam,' continuedMr. Pickwick, 'but before we take them away, it is necessary that theyshould be looked up, and put together.<>
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Bardell, 'and here's thechange, and I hope you'll take a little drop of something to keep thecold out, if it's only for old acquaintance' sake, Mr. Weller.<>
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The moment he saw him eat, all doubt onthe subject was removed, and he perceived at once that if he purposedto take up his temporary quarters where he was, he must make his footinggood without delay.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Stiggins was easily prevailed on to take another glass of the hotpine-apple rum-and-water, and a second, and a third, and then to refreshhimself with a slight supper, previous to beginning again.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I vish you could muffle that 'ere Stiggins, and take him vith you,'said Mr. Weller.<>
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Again the bugle sounds lustily forth, and rouses thecottager's wife and children, who peep out at the house door, and watchthe coach till it turns the corner, when they once more crouch roundthe blazing fire, and throw on another log of wood against fathercomes home; while father himself, a full mile off, has just exchangeda friendly nod with the coachman, and turned round to take a good longstare at the vehicle as it whirls away.<>
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It was the sort of afternoon that might induce a coupleof elderly gentlemen, in a lonely field, to take off their greatcoatsand play at leap-frog in pure lightness of heart and gaiety; and wefirmly believe that had Mr. Tupman at that moment proffered 'a back,'Mr. Pickwick would have accepted his offer with the utmost avidity.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) First, there was Wardle himself, looking, if that were possible, morejolly than ever; then there were Bella and her faithful Trundle; and,lastly, there were Emily and some eight or ten young ladies, who had allcome down to the wedding, which was to take place next day, and who werein as happy and important a state as young ladies usually are, on suchmomentous occasions; and they were, one and all, startling the fieldsand lanes, far and wide, with their frolic and laughter.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You'll take me in?' said the benevolent old clergyman.<>
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Amidst the silence of the company, the whispering of the women-servants,and the awkward embarrassment of the men, Mr. Pickwick proceeded--'Ladies and gentlemen--no, I won't say ladies and gentlemen, I'll callyou my friends, my dear friends, if the ladies will allow me to take sogreat a liberty--'Here Mr. Pickwick was interrupted by immense applause from the ladies,echoed by the gentlemen, during which the owner of the eyes wasdistinctly heard to state that she could kiss that dear Mr. Pickwick.<>
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There warn't a pickpocket in all Londonas didn't take a pull at that chain, but the chain 'ud never break, andthe watch 'ud never come out, so they soon got tired of dragging such aheavy old gen'l'm'n along the pavement, and he'd go home and laugh tillthe pigtail wibrated like the penderlum of a Dutch clock.<>
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And wen he come straight agin,the watch and chain was gone, and what's worse than that, the oldgen'l'm'n's digestion was all wrong ever afterwards, to the wery lastday of his life; so just you look about you, young feller, and take careyou don't get too fat.<>
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Ho! ho!ho!"'As the goblin laughed, the sexton observed, for one instant, abrilliant illumination within the windows of the church, as if thewhole building were lighted up; it disappeared, the organ pealed fortha lively air, and whole troops of goblins, the very counterpart of thefirst one, poured into the churchyard, and began playing at leap-frogwith the tombstones, never stopping for an instant to take breath, but"overing" the highest among them, one after the other, with the mostmarvellous dexterity.<>
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I wish you'd take it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Come to take you home to-morrow,' replied Benjamin.<>
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Youneedn't take your hand away to do that.<>
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You know, my dear Sir, if you WILL take themanagement of your affairs into your own hands after entrusting them toyour solicitor, you must also take the consequences.<>
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Books of practice, heaps of papers, and openedletters, were scattered over the table, without any attempt at order orarrangement; the furniture of the room was old and rickety; the doors ofthe book-case were rotting in their hinges; the dust flew out from thecarpet in little clouds at every step; the blinds were yellow with ageand dirt; the state of everything in the room showed, with a clearnessnot to be mistaken, that Mr. Serjeant Snubbin was far too much occupiedwith his professional pursuits to take any great heed or regard of hispersonal comforts.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Perhaps you will take Mr. Pickwick away,' said the Serjeant,'and--and--and--hear anything Mr. Pickwick may wish to communicate.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I should be very sorry, Sawyer,' said Mr. Noddy, 'to create anyunpleasantness at any friend's table, and much less at yours,Sawyer--very; but I must take this opportunity of informing Mr. Gunterthat he is no gentleman.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) '"So I take the privilidge of the day, Mary, my dear--as the gen'l'm'nin difficulties did, ven he valked out of a Sunday--to tell you that thefirst and only time I see you, your likeness was took on my hart in muchquicker time and brighter colours than ever a likeness was took by theprofeel macheen (wich p'raps you may have heerd on Mary my dear) althoit DOES finish a portrait and put the frame and glass on complete,with a hook at the end to hang it up by, and all in two minutes and aquarter.<>
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He might take that opportunityof expressing his firm persuasion that the late Mr. Dibdin, seeing theerrors of his former life, had written that song to show the advantagesof abstinence.<>
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A visible effect was produced immediately, several jurymenbeginning to take voluminous notes with the utmost eagerness.<>
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Then he was asked whether he hadn't seen her a hundredtimes--whether he couldn't swear that he had seen her more than fiftytimes--whether he didn't know that he had seen her at least seventy-fivetimes, and so forth; the satisfactory conclusion which was arrived at,at last, being, that he had better take care of himself, and mind whathe was about.<>
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Nobody had; and as the proposition was warmly seconded by Perker, whoconsidered it extremely probable that if Mr. Pickwick saw a littlechange and gaiety he would be inclined to think better of hisdetermination, and worse of a debtor's prison, it was carriedunanimously; and Sam was at once despatched to the White Horse Cellar,to take five places by the half-past seven o'clock coach, next morning.<>
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He looked up from his breakfast asMr. Pickwick entered, with a fierce and peremptory air, which was verydignified; and, having scrutinised that gentleman and his companions tohis entire satisfaction, hummed a tune, in a manner which seemed to saythat he rather suspected somebody wanted to take advantage of him, butit wouldn't do.<>
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If they try to squeeze six people into an infernal box that onlyholds four, I'll take a post-chaise and bring an action.<>
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THE CHIEF FEATURES OF WHICH WILL BE FOUND TO BEAN AUTHENTIC VERSION OF THE LEGEND OF PRINCE BLADUD, AND A MOSTEXTRAORDINARY CALAMITY THAT BEFELL Mr. WINKLEAs Mr. Pickwick contemplated a stay of at least two months in Bath, hedeemed it advisable to take private lodgings for himself and friends forthat period; and as a favourable opportunity offered for their securing,on moderate terms, the upper portion of a house in the Royal Crescent,which was larger than they required, Mr. and Mrs.<>
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He might have endeavoured to break her heart bya systematic course of insult and neglect; or, if the spirit of her sex,and a proud consciousness of her many wrongs had upheld her under thisill-treatment, he might have sought to take her life, and so get rid ofher effectually.<>
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It was in the time of the heathen deities, who usedoccasionally to take people at their words, with a promptness, in somecases, extremely awkward.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Winkle, catching sight of a lady's face at the window of the sedan,turned hastily round, plied the knocker with all his might and main, andcalled frantically upon the chairman to take the chair away again.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Take it away, take it away,' cried Mr. Winkle.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I beg your pardon, Mr. Weller,' said Mr. John Smauker, agonised at theexceeding ungenteel sound, 'will you take my arm?Thank'ee, you're wery good, but I won't deprive you of it,' repliedSam.<>
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Then take the kiver off.<>
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I only hopeyou'll take care o' yourselves, and not compromise nothin' o' yourdignity, which is a wery charmin' thing to see, when one's outa-walkin', and has always made me wery happy to look at, ever sinceI was a boy about half as high as the brass-headed stick o' my weryrespectable friend, Blazes, there.<>
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It wouldn't take much to settle that 'ere Dowler, Sir.<>
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The excellent andconsiderate feelings which prompted Mr. Winkle to take this step cannever be too highly appreciated or too warmly extolled.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You don't take water, of course?' said Bob Sawyer.<>
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If it doesn't, I'll take her abroad for a littlewhile, and see what that'll do.<>
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Mr. SAMUEL WELLER, BEING INTRUSTED WITH A MISSION OFLOVE, PROCEEDS TO EXECUTE IT; WITH WHAT SUCCESS WILL HEREINAFTER APPEARDuring the whole of next day, Sam kept Mr. Winkle steadily in sight,fully determined not to take his eyes off him for one instant, untilhe should receive express instructions from the fountain-head.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) He waited so long without this anxiously-expected event occurring, thathe began to think it was not going to take place at all, when he heardlight footsteps upon the gravel, and immediately afterwards beheldArabella walking pensively down the garden.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll take care on him, sir,' replied Sam.<>
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What will you take, sir?Will you take port wine, sir, or sherry wine, sir? I can recommend theale, sir; or perhaps you'd like to taste the porter, sir? Allow me tohave the felicity of hanging up your nightcap, Sir.<>
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What will you take to go out?' 'I beg yourpardon,' replied Mr. Pickwick.<>
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What will you take to be paid out?' said the butcher.<>
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Will you take three bob?And a bender,' suggested the clerical gentleman.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) After this introductory preface, the three chums informed Mr. Pickwick,in a breath, that money was, in the Fleet, just what money was out ofit; that it would instantly procure him almost anything he desired; andthat, supposing he had it, and had no objection to spend it, if he onlysignified his wish to have a room to himself, he might take possessionof one, furnished and fitted to boot, in half an hour's time.<>
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Mr. Weller nodded in a manner which bespoke his inward approval ofthese arrangements; and then, turning to Mr. Pell, said, pointing to hisfriend George--'Ven do you take his cloths off?Why,' replied Mr. Pell, 'he stands third on the opposed list, and Ishould think it would be his turn in about half an hour.<>
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His success was not quite equal to his expectations; for havingneglected to take his hat off, it was knocked over his eyes by someunseen person, upon whose toes he had alighted with considerableforce.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Stop there by himself, poor creetur!' exclaimed the elder Mr. Weller,'without nobody to take his part! It can't be done, Samivel, it can't bedone.<>
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With this prelude, Mr. Samuel Weller burst at once into the followingwild and beautiful legend, which, under the impression that it is notgenerally known, we take the liberty of quoting.<>
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We would beg to callparticular attention to the monosyllable at the end of the second andfourth lines, which not only enables the singer to take breath at thosepoints, but greatly assists the metre.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I won't take 'em,' said Mr. Weller.<>
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But it is no favour asking him to take his money, Sam,' reasoned Mr.Pickwick.<>
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"I'll send you a box of pills directly, and don'tyou never take no more of 'em," he says.<>
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'Well,' said the cobbler, 'whenI was going to take out a probate of the will, the nieces and nevys,who was desperately disappointed at not getting all the money, enters acaveat against it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) But, if Mr. Winkle's behaviour had been unaccountable in the morning, itbecame perfectly unearthly and solemn when, under the influence of hisfeelings, and his share of the bottle or six, he prepared to take leaveof his friend.<>
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Will you take a glass of wine?You're wery good, Sir,' replied Mr. Roker, accepting the profferedglass.<>
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I offered Neddy two six-penn'orths to one upon it just now,but he wouldn't take it, and quite right.<>
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I was afeerd, from his manner, thathe might ha' forgotten to take pepper vith that 'ere last cowcumber heeat.<>
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Weller remarking, and concluding that theybore some disparaging reference either to herself or to Mr. Stiggins,or to both, was on the point of becoming infinitely worse, when Mr.Stiggins, getting on his legs as well as he could, proceeded todeliver an edifying discourse for the benefit of the company, but moreespecially of Mr. Samuel, whom he adjured in moving terms to be upon hisguard in that sink of iniquity into which he was cast; to abstainfrom all hypocrisy and pride of heart; and to take in all things exactpattern and copy by him (Stiggins), in which case he might calculate onarriving, sooner or later at the comfortable conclusion, that, likehim, he was a most estimable and blameless character, and that allhis acquaintances and friends were hopelessly abandoned and profligatewretches.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'For lone people as have got nobody to care for them, or take careof them, or as have been hurt in their mind, or that kind of thing,'observed Mr. Raddle, plucking up a little cheerfulness, and lookinground, 'the country is all very well.<>
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You had better take your tea by yourself, Sir, indeed,' said Mrs.<>
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It was their duty in theway of business, to take you in execution for them costs; but they wereanxious to spare your feelings as much as they could.<>
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But won't it bebetter to see Mr. Perker to-night, so that we may be there, the firstthing in the morning?Why,' responded Lowten, after a little consideration, 'if it was inanybody else's case, Perker wouldn't be best pleased at my going up tohis house; but as it's Mr. Pickwick's, I think I may venture to take acab and charge it to the office.<>
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Will you take a glass of wine, Lowten?' 'No, thankyou, Sir.<>
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You must take this matter inhand for them, my dear sir.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I can't permit it, on any account,' said the old lady; 'your testimonywill be very important, and I must take you into the house with me.<>
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Immediately on the old lady'sentering the shop, Mr. Benjamin Allen and Mr. Bob Sawyer, who had beenputting the spirits-and-water out of sight, and upsetting nauseous drugsto take off the smell of the tobacco smoke, issued hastily forth in atransport of pleasure and affection.<>
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Bob,' said Mr. Allen, 'will you take my aunt into the surgery?Certainly,' responded Bob, in a most professional voice.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Oh, devil take the laburnum-tree, ma'am!' said Bob, quite forgettinghis professional dignity in his anxiety.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The impression at once produced on Mr. Weller's mind by what he saw,was, that Mr. Martin was hired by the establishment of Sawyer,late Nockemorf, to take strong medicine, or to go into fits and beexperimentalised upon, or to swallow poison now and then with the viewof testing the efficacy of some new antidotes, or to do something orother to promote the great science of medicine, and gratify the ardentspirit of inquiry burning in the bosoms of its two young professors.<>
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You'll take some tea, Mr. Pickwick?' said the old lady, withirresistible sweetness.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'One night, within four-and-twenty hours of the time when he had settledto take shipping for London, my uncle supped at the house of a very oldfriend of his, a Bailie Mac something and four syllables after it, wholived in the old town of Edinburgh.<>
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He stalked gravely to the coach door,pulled off his hat, and held it above his head at arm's length, cockinghis little finger in the air at the same time, as some affected peopledo, when they take a cup of tea.<>
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It's the whole point of the thing, youknow--that, and leaving the business to take care of itself, as it seemsto have made up its mind not to take care of me.<>
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Sam, take it down.<>
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I think it would be best to take it in,' replied Mr. Ben Allen; 'itwould serve him right to take it in and keep it, wouldn't it?It would,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'shall I?I think it the most proper course we could possibly adopt,' repliedBen.<>
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Just the reason why we should take something to enable us to bear upagainst the fatigue,' remonstrated Mr. Bob Sawyer.<>
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Suddenlyaware that he was in the presence of a stranger, Mr. Ben Allen advancedand, shaking Mr. Winkle most affectionately by both hands for about fiveminutes, murmured, in some half-intelligible fragments of sentences, thegreat delight he felt in seeing him, and a hospitable inquiry whether hefelt disposed to take anything after his walk, or would prefer waiting'till dinner-time;' which done, he sat down and gazed about him with apetrified stare, as if he had not the remotest idea where he was, whichindeed he had not.<>
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Without goin' so far as to as-sert, as somewery sensible people do, that postboys and donkeys is both immortal,wot I say is this: that wenever they feels theirselves gettin' stiff andpast their work, they just rides off together, wun postboy to a pair inthe usual way; wot becomes on 'em nobody knows, but it's wery probableas they starts avay to take their pleasure in some other vorld, forthere ain't a man alive as ever see either a donkey or a postboya-takin' his pleasure in this!'Expatiating upon this learned and remarkable theory, and citing manycurious statistical and other facts in its support, Sam Weller beguiledthe time until they reached Dunchurch, where a dry postboy and freshhorses were procured; the next stage was Daventry, and the nextTowcester; and at the end of each stage it rained harder than it haddone at the beginning.<>
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Here, bending towards Mr. Pickwick,he whispered in a deep, hollow voice, 'A Buff ball, Sir, will take placein Birmingham to-morrow evening.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You take yourselves off to bed quietly,' said Sam, 'or I'll put youboth in it, and let you fight it out vith the mouth tied, as I voulda dozen sich, if they played these games.<>
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INVOLVING A SERIOUS CHANGE IN THE WELLER FAMILY, AND THEUNTIMELY DOWNFALL OF Mr. STIGGINSConsidering it a matter of delicacy to abstain from introducing eitherBob Sawyer or Ben Allen to the young couple, until they were fullyprepared to expect them, and wishing to spare Arabella's feelings asmuch as possible, Mr. Pickwick proposed that he and Sam should alight inthe neighbourhood of the George and Vulture, and that the two young menshould for the present take up their quarters elsewhere.<>
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There, take it; it's more than youdeserve.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'My DEAR SAMMLE,'I am werry sorry to have the pleasure of being a Bear of ill news yourMother in law cort cold consekens of imprudently settin too long on thedamp grass in the rain a hearing of a shepherd who warnt able to leaveoff till late at night owen to his having vound his-self up vith brandyand vater and not being able to stop his-self till he got a little soberwhich took a many hours to do the doctor says that if she'd svallo'dvarm brandy and vater artervards insted of afore she mightn't have beenno vus her veels wos immedetly greased and everythink done to set heragoin as could be inwented your father had hopes as she vould havevorked round as usual but just as she wos a turnen the corner my boy shetook the wrong road and vent down hill vith a welocity you never see andnotvithstandin that the drag wos put on directly by the medikel manit wornt of no use at all for she paid the last pike at twenty minutesafore six o'clock yesterday evenin havin done the journey wery muchunder the reglar time vich praps was partly owen to her haven taken inwery little luggage by the vay your father says that if you vill comeand see me Sammy he vill take it as a wery great favor for I am werylonely Samivel n.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I don't take no pride out on it, Sammy,' replied Mr. Weller, poking thefire vehemently, 'it's a horrid sitiwation.<>
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The rest will be inwested in my name,' continued the elder Mr. Weller;'and wen I'm took off the road, it'll come to you, so take care youdon't spend it all at vunst, my boy, and mind that no widder gets ainklin' o' your fortun', or you're done.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Hush,' whispered Mr. Weller, with apprehensive looks, 'don't take nonotice on 'em, Sammy, it's vun o' the widders, p'raps.<>
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We might live very comfortably together now, Mr. Samuel,eh? I could take care of his property when you are away--good care, yousee.<>
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The agent atLiverpool said he had been obliged to you many times when you were inbusiness, and he would be glad to take him on your recommendation.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Not a bit of it,' answered Wardle; 'she has been crying and moping eversince, except last night, between tea and supper, when she made a greatparade of writing a letter that I pretended to take no notice of.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Oh,' said Wardle, 'you don't know, eh? Take this cheese to Mr.Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'As four heads is better than two, Sammy,' said Mr. Weller, as theydrove along the London Road in the chaise-cart, 'and as all this hereproperty is a wery great temptation to a legal gen'l'm'n, ve'll take acouple o' friends o' mine vith us, as'll be wery soon down upon him ifhe comes anythin' irreg'lar; two o' them as saw you to the Fleetthat day.<>
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I'll take adozen.<>
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I've no objection to take you that way.<>
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If you'll take care on it for me, sir, Ishall be wery much obliged to you.<>
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I must begyou to take this back, Mr. Weller.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I take a great interest in her, Mr. Weller,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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If she don't,she's not the young 'ooman I take her for, and I give her up vithreadiness.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll take a chair, if you'll allow me, ma'am,' said the stranger.<>
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The decanters passed from hand to hand with unwonted briskness, andMr. Pickwick, looking round on the faces of his friends with a cheerfulsmile, proceeded--'All the changes that have taken place among us,'said Mr. Pickwick, 'I mean the marriage that HAS taken place, and themarriage that WILL take place, with the changes they involve, renderedit necessary for me to think, soberly and at once, upon my future plans.<>
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I propose to consecrate thislittle retreat, by having a ceremony in which I take a great interest,performed there.<>
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His account of both wasquite satisfactory to Wardle--as almost any other account would havebeen, for the good old gentleman was overflowing with Hilarity andkindness--and a handsome portion having been bestowed upon Emily, themarriage was fixed to take place on the fourth day from that time--thesuddenness of which preparations reduced three dressmakers and a tailorto the extreme verge of insanity.<>
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We, who have no suchoptical powers, are better pleased to take our last parting look at thevisionary companions of many solitary hours, when the brief sunshine ofthe world is blazing full upon them.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well, let's take any imaginary case of Sherlock Holmes, and Lestrade,the official detective.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Looks as if he was expecting this," he said; "yet it seems queer hedidn't take it with him when he went out into the hall.<>
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I know nobody who'd take moretrouble to keep his position in the world.<>
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First, all killing can be divided into rational andirrational, and we'll take the last first, because they are much fewer.<>
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Last time I'll take one of these yokels----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) But his complaints received small attention in the general excitementthat gathered round Father Brown and his news.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) He blinked again at the beehive and continued: "But, I suppose, theshortest explanation is to take it from the standpoint of the man whodid it.<>
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He could leave hisfinger-prints and foot-prints; he could lean the familiar faceagainst windows and take it away.<>
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"I think yougenerally take a gun to bed with you.<>
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"And now, I think, having got everything in a tightbox, so to speak, we can take stock of what we've got.<>
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He might have been a manwho had begun to take drugs; but even on that assumption there wassomething that suggested that he had a reason for doing it; that thedrug was not the cause of the tragedy, but the tragedy the cause of thedrug.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Father Brown seemed to take it quite naturally and even casually, thathe should be called in to consider the queer conduct of one of hisflock, whether she was to be regarded as a black sheep or only as a lostlamb.<>
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Somebody else, perhaps-yes, possibly-it mightbe well to take ordinary precautions if she comes out with a leap.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) The lady followed him, still pale and calm, to take up her own positionthere.<>
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I can fancy her awaiting that interview in an agony of terrorand wondering how the old beau would take the appearance of a rival.<>
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Well, he couldn't sayfairer than that, could he? But he's so anxious to get the thing settledthat he offered to take me up in his own car to Musgrave Moss.<>
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Of course, you will take the carall the same.<>
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I do most certainly propose to hand on thewhole of my property to my son, as my father handed it on to me; andnothing--I say advisedly, nothing--would induce me to take any othercourse.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I hope you will take some refreshment," he said, in the same equablefashion.<>
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Why, we allsaw him take it ourselves.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Because he didn't want to take his glove off," said Father Brown.<>
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Itwouldn't be specially his temptation to take jewels; but it would be histemptation to take credit for miracles that didn't belong to him anymore than the jewels.<>
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These deadly strokes take different peoplein different ways.<>
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"How long are you going on piling thisup?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "The fourth and fifth points are pretty conclusive," said the priestcalmly, "especially if you take them together.<>
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" said Father Brown dully, "that I take a more serious view ofhis offence.<>
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But the little, literal people take it at itsmarket value.<>
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It's easy enough to theorize and take hypothetical cases; but weall know we're only talking in the air.<>
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ant take
= scarto di pellicola ,
---------------
be good enough as take me home
= abbia la bontà di accompagnarmi a casa ,
---------------
be so good as take me home
= abbia la bontà di accompagnarmi a casa ,
---------------
but that would take years
= ma ci vorrebbe un'eternità! ,
---------------
camera take
= ripresa , inquadratura ,
---------------
come and take pot-luck with us
= vieni a pranzo da noi, mangerai quello che passa il convento ,
---------------
don't forget to take your fishing things with you
= non dimenticare di prendere con te gli attrezzi da pesca! ,
---------------
don't take her work for granted
= non fidarti ciecamente delle qualità del suo lavoro ,
---------------
don't take his work for granted
= non fidarti ciecamente delle qualità del suo lavoro ,
---------------
don't take it unkindly
= non prendertela, non avertene a male ,
---------------
don't take to drink
= non darti al bere ,
---------------
double take
= ripresa di una stessa azione da una diversa angolazione ,
---------------
hold take
= riserva , ripresa di riserva ,
---------------
keep take
= ripresa di riserva ,
---------------
i advise you to take a firm line with
= ti consiglio di seguire un'energica linea di condotta verso,
---------------
i won't take no for an answer
= non accetto rifiuti!,
---------------
i'll take care of the bill
= al conto ci penso io,
---------------
i've had about as much as i can take
= ne ho abbastanza! non ne posso più!,
---------------
insurance take
= ripresa di sicurezza ,
---------------
it will take some doing
= ci vorrà del bello e del buono!,
---------------
it's best to take an umbrella
= è meglio portare l'ombrello,
---------------
long take
= piano sequenza ,
---------------
ng take
= scarto , inquadratura da scartare ,
---------------
no good take
= scarto , inquadratura da scartare ,
---------------
ok take
= buona! ,
---------------
on the take
= corrotto,
---------------
out take
= doppio , scarto , inquadratura scartata durante il montaggio ,
---------------
print take
= inquadratura da proiettare ,
---------------
refinishing take
= fegatello ,
---------------
selected take
= ripresa buona ,
---------------
sound take
= ripresa sonora ,
---------------
swift to take offence
= permaloso , lesto a prendersela ,
---------------
symmetric take
= inquadratura corrispondente ,
---------------
the deuce take it
= il diavolo se lo porti! ,
---------------
they will take some beating
= sarà dura batterli ,
---------------
triple take
= ripresa della stessa azione prima in campo lungo , poi in piano americano ed infine in primo piano ,
---------------
unslated take
= inquadratura senza ciak ,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - prelevare
Ausiliare:avere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io prelevo
tu prelevi
egli preleva
noi preleviamo
voi prelevate
essi prelevano
Imperfetto
io prelevavo
tu prelevavi
egli prelevava
noi prelevavamo
voi prelevavate
essi prelevavano
Passato remoto
io prelevai
tu prelevasti
egli prelevò
noi prelevammo
voi prelevaste
essi prelevarono
Passato prossimo
io ho prelevato
tu hai prelevato
egli ha prelevato
noi abbiamo prelevato
voi avete prelevato
essi hanno prelevato
Trapassato prossimo
io avevo prelevato
tu avevi prelevato
egli aveva prelevato
noi avevamo prelevato
voi avevate prelevato
essi avevano prelevato
Trapassato remoto
io ebbi prelevato
tu avesti prelevato
egli ebbe prelevato
noi avemmo prelevato
voi eveste prelevato
essi ebbero prelevato
Futuro semplice
io preleverò
tu preleverai
egli preleverà
noi preleveremo
voi preleverete
essi preleveranno
Futuro anteriore
io avrò prelevato
tu avrai prelevato
egli avrà prelevato
noi avremo prelevato
voi avrete prelevato
essi avranno prelevato
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io prelevi
che tu prelevi
che egli prelevi
che noi preleviamo
che voi preleviate
che essi prelevino
Passato
che io abbia prelevato
che tu abbia prelevato
che egli abbia prelevato
che noi abbiamo prelevato
che voi abbiate prelevato
che essi abbiano prelevato
Imperfetto
che io prelevassi
che tu prelevassi
che egli prelevasse
che noi prelevassimo
che voi prelevaste
che essi prelevassero
Trapassato
che io avessi prelevato
che tu avessi prelevato
che egli avesse prelevato
che noi avessimo prelevato
che voi aveste prelevato
che essi avessero prelevato
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io preleverei
tu preleveresti
egli preleverebbe
noi preleveremmo
voi prelevereste
essi preleverebbero
Passato
io avrei prelevato
tu avresti prelevato
egli avrebbe prelevato
noi avremmo prelevato
voi avreste prelevato
essi avrebbero prelevato
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
preleva
prelevi
preleviamo
prelevate
prelevino
Futuro
-
preleverai
preleverà
preleveremo
preleverete
preleveranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
prelevare
Passato
avere prelevato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
prelevante
Passato
prelevato
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
prelevando
Passato
avendo prelevato
INDICATIVO - passivo
Presente
io sono prelevato
tu sei prelevato
egli é prelevato
noi siamo prelevati
voi siete prelevati
essi sono prelevati
Imperfetto
io ero prelevato
tu eri prelevato
egli era prelevato
noi eravamo prelevati
voi eravate prelevati
essi erano prelevati
Passato remoto
io fui prelevato
tu fosti prelevato
egli fu prelevato
noi fummo prelevati
voi foste prelevati
essi furono prelevati
Passato prossimo
io sono stato prelevato
tu sei stato prelevato
egli é stato prelevato
noi siamo stati prelevati
voi siete stati prelevati
essi sono stati prelevati
Trapassato prossimo
io ero stato prelevato
tu eri stato prelevato
egli era stato prelevato
noi eravamo stati prelevati
voi eravate stati prelevati
essi erano statiprelevati
Trapassato remoto
io fui stato prelevato
tu fosti stato prelevato
egli fu stato prelevato
noi fummo stati prelevati
voi foste stati prelevati
essi furono stati prelevati
Futuro semplice
io sarò prelevato
tu sarai prelevato
egli sarà prelevato
noi saremo prelevati
voi sarete prelevati
essi saranno prelevati
Futuro anteriore
io sarò stato prelevato
tu sarai stato prelevato
egli sarà stato prelevato
noi saremo stati prelevati
voi sarete stati prelevati
essi saranno stati prelevati
CONGIUNTIVO - passivo
Presente
che io sia prelevato
che tu sia prelevato
che egli sia prelevato
che noi siamo prelevati
che voi siate prelevati
che essi siano prelevati
Passato
che io sia stato prelevato
che tu sia stato prelevato
che egli sia stato prelevato
che noi siamo stati prelevati
che voi siate stati prelevati
che essi siano stati prelevati
Imperfetto
che io fossi prelevato
che tu fossi prelevato
che egli fosse prelevato
che noi fossimo prelevati
che voi foste prelevati
che essi fossero prelevati
Trapassato
che io fossi stato prelevato
che tu fossi stato prelevato
che egli fosse stato prelevato
che noi fossimo stati prelevati
che voi foste stati prelevati
che essi fossero stati prelevati
CONDIZIONALE - passivo
Presente
io sarei prelevato
tu saresti prelevato
egli sarebbe prelevato
noi saremmo prelevati
voi sareste prelevati
essi sarebbero prelevati
Passato
io sarei stato prelevato
tu saresti stato prelevato
egli sarebbe stato prelevato
noi saremmo stati prelevati
voi sareste stati prelevati
essi sarebbero stati prelevati
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - passivo
Presente
-
sii prelevato
sia prelevato
siamo prelevati
siate prelevati
siano prelevati
Futuro
-
sarai prelevato
sarà prelevato
saremo prelevati
sarete prelevati
saranno prelevati
INFINITO - passivo
Presente
essere prelevato
Passato
essere stato prelevato
PARTICIPIO - passivo
Presente
-
Passato
prelevato
 
 
GERUNDIO - passivo
Presente
essendo prelevato
Passato
essendo stato prelevato
Verb: to take-took-taken
Ausiliar: to have - transitivo/intransitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I take
you take
he/she/it takes
we take
you take
they take
Simple past
I took
you took
he/she/it took
we took
you took
they took
Simple past
I took
you took
he/she/it took
we took
you took
they took
Present perfect
I have taken
you have taken
he/she/it has taken
we have taken
you have taken
they have taken
Past perfect
I had taken
you had taken
he/she/it had taken
we had taken
you had taken
they had taken
Past perfect
I had taken
you had taken
he/she/it had taken
we had taken
you had taken
they had taken
Simple future
I will take
you will take
he/she/it will take
we will take
you will take
they will take
Future perfect
I will have taken
you will have taken
he/she/it will have taken
we will have taken
you will have taken
they will have taken
Present continuous
I am taking
you are taking
he/she/it is taking
we are taking
you are taking
they are taking
Past simple continuous
I was taking
you were taking
he/she/it was taking
we were taking
you were taking
they were taking
Future continuous
I will be taking
you will be taking
he/she/it will be taking
we will be taking
you will be taking
they will be taking
Future perfect continuous
I will have been taking
you will have been taking
he/she/it will have been taking
we will have been taking
you will have been taking
they will have been taking
Present perfect continuous
I have been taking
you have been taking
he/she/it has been taking
we have been taking
you have been taking
they have been taking
Past perfect continuous
I had been taking
you had been taking
he/she/it had been taking
we had been taking
you had been taking
they had been taking
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I take
That you take
That he/she/it take
That we take
That you take
That they take
Present perfect
That I have taken
That you have taken
That he/she/it have taken
That we have taken
That you have taken
That they have taken
Simple past
That I took
That you took
That he/she/it took
That we took
That you took
That they took
Past perfect
That I had taken
That you had taken
That he/she/it had taken
That we had taken
That you had taken
That they had taken
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would take
you would take
we would take
we would take
you would take
they would take
Past
I would have taken
you would have taken
he/she/it would have taken
we would have taken
you would have taken
they would have taken
Present continous
I would be taking
you would be taking
we would be taking
we would be taking
you would be taking
they would be taking
Past continous
I would have been taking
you would have been taking
he/she/it would have been taking
we would have been taking
you would have been taking
they would have been taking
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
let me take
take
let him take
let us take
take
let them take
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to take
Past
to have taken
Present continous
to be taking
Perfect continous
to have been taking
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
taking
Past
taken
Perfect
having taken
Affermative - GERUND
Present
taking
Past
having taken
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do not take
you do not take
he/she/it does not takes
we do not take
you do not take
they do not take
Simple past
I did not take
you did not take
he/she/it did not take
we did not take
you did not take
they did not take
Simple past
I did not take
you did not take
he/she/it did not take
we did not take
you did not take
they did not take
Present perfect
I have not taken
you have not taken
he/she/it has not taken
we have not taken
you have not taken
they have not taken
Past perfect
I had not taken
you had not taken
he/she/it had not taken
we had not taken
you had not taken
they had not taken
Past perfect
I had not taken
you had not taken
he/she/it had not taken
we had not taken
you had not taken
they had not taken
Simple future
I will not take
you will not take
he/she/it will not take
we will not take
you will not take
they will not take
Future perfect
I will not have taken
you will not have taken
he/she/it will not have taken
we will not have taken
you will not have taken
they will not have taken
Present continuous
I am not taking
you are not taking
he/she/it is not taking
we are not taking
you are not taking
they are not taking
Past simple continuous
I was not taking
you were not taking
he/she/it was not taking
we were not taking
you were not taking
they were not taking
Future continuous
I will not be taking
you will not be taking
he/she/it will not be taking
we will not be taking
you will not be taking
they will not be taking
Future perfect continuous
I will not have been taking
you will not have been taking
he/she/it will not have been taking
we will not have been taking
you will not have been taking
they will not have been taking
Present perfect continuous
I have not been taking
you have not been taking
he/she/it has not been taking
we have not been taking
you have not been taking
they have not been taking
Past perfect continuous
I had not been taking
you had not been taking
he/she/it had not been taking
we had not been taking
you had not been taking
they had not been taking
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do not take
That you do not take
That he/she/it does not take
That we do not take
That you do not take
That they do not take
Present perfect
That I have not taken
That you have not taken
That he/she/it have not taken
That we have not taken
That you have not taken
That they have not taken
Simple past
That I did not take
That you did not take
That he/she/it did not take
That we did not take
That you did not take
That they did not take
Past perfect
That I had not taken
That you had not taken
That he/she/it had not taken
That we had not taken
That you had not taken
That they had not taken
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not take
you would not take
we would not take
we would not take
you would not take
they would not take
Past
I would not have taken
you would not have taken
he/she/it would not have taken
we would not have taken
you would not have taken
they would not have taken
Present continous
I would not be taking
you would not be taking
we would not be taking
we would not be taking
you would not be taking
they would not be taking
Past continous
I would not have been taking
you would not have been taking
he/she/it would not have been taking
we would not have been taking
you would not have been taking
they would not have been taking
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
do not let me take
do not take
do not let him take
do not let us take
do not take
do not let them take
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to take
Past
not to have taken
Present continous
not to be taking
Perfect continous
not to have been taking
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not taking
Past
not taken
Perfect
not having taken
Negative - GERUND
Present
not taking
Past
not having taken
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I take ?
do you take ?
does she/he/it takes ?
do we take ?
do you take ?
do they take ?
Simple past
did I take ?
did you take ?
did she/he/it take ?
did we take ?
did you take ?
did they take ?
Simple past
did I take ?
did you take ?
did she/he/it take ?
did we take ?
did you take ?
did they take ?
Present perfect
have I taken ?
have you taken ?
has she/he/it taken ?
have we taken ?
have you taken ?
have they taken ?
Past perfect
had I taken ?
had you taken ?
had she/he/it taken ?
had we taken ?
had you taken ?
had they taken ?
Past perfect
had I taken ?
had you taken ?
had she/he/it taken ?
had we taken ?
had you taken ?
had they taken ?
Simple future
will I take ?
will you take ?
will she/he/it take ?
will we take ?
will you take ?
will they take ?
Future perfect
will I have taken ?
will you have taken ?
will she/he/it have taken ?
will we have taken ?
will you have taken ?
will they have taken ?
Present continuous
am I taking ?
are you taking ?
is she/he/it taking ?
are we taking ?
are you taking ?
are they taking ?
Past simple continuous
was I taking ?
were you taking ?
was she/he/it taking ?
were we taking ?
were you taking ?
were they taking ?
Future continuous
will I be taking ?
will you be taking ?
will she/he/it be taking ?
will we be taking ?
will you be taking ?
will they be taking ?
Future perfect continuous
will I have been taking ?
will you have been taking ?
will she/he/it have been taking ?
will we have been taking ?
will you have been taking ?
will they have been taking ?
Present perfect continuous
have I been taking ?
have you been taking ?
has she/he/it been taking ?
have we been taking ?
have you been taking ?
have they been taking ?
Past perfect continuous
had I been taking ?
had you been taking ?
had she/he/it been taking ?
had we been taking ?
had you been taking ?
had they been taking ?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I take ?
That do you take ?
That does she/he/it take ?
That do we take ?
That do you take ?
That do they take ?
Present perfect
That have I taken ?
That have you taken ?
That have she/he/it taken ?
That have we taken ?
That have you taken ?
That have they taken ?
Simple past
That did I take ?
That did you take ?
That did she/he/it take ?
That did we take ?
That did you take ?
That did they take ?
Past perfect
That had I taken ?
That had you taken ?
That had she/he/it taken ?
That had we taken ?
That had you taken ?
That had they taken ?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I take ?
would you take ?
would she/he/it take ?
would we take ?
would you take ?
would they take ?
Past
would I have taken?
would you have taken?
would she/he/it have taken?
would we have taken?
would you have taken?
would they have taken?
Present continous
would I be taking ?
would you be taking ?
would she/he/it be taking ?
would we be taking ?
would you be taking ?
would they be taking ?
Past continous
would I have been taking?
would you have been taking?
would she/he/it have been taking?
would we have been taking?
would you have been taking?
would they have been taking?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not take ?
do you not take ?
does she/he/it not takes ?
do we not take ?
do you not take ?
do they not take ?
Simple past
did I not take ?
did you not take ?
did she/he/it not take ?
did we not take ?
did you not take ?
did they not take ?
Simple past
did I not take ?
did you not take ?
did she/he/it not take ?
did we not take ?
did you not take ?
did they not take ?
Present perfect
have I not taken ?
have you not taken ?
has she/he/it not taken ?
have we not taken ?
have you not taken ?
have they not taken ?
Past perfect
had I not taken ?
had you not taken ?
had she/he/it not taken ?
had we not taken ?
had you not taken ?
had they not taken ?
Past perfect
had I not taken ?
had you not taken ?
had she/he/it not taken ?
had we not taken ?
had you not taken ?
had they not taken ?
Simple future
will I not take ?
will you not take ?
will she/he/it not take ?
will we not take ?
will you not take ?
will they not take ?
Future perfect
will I not have taken ?
will you not have taken ?
will she/he/it not have taken ?
will we not have taken ?
will you not have taken ?
will they not have taken ?
Present continuous
am I not taking ?
are you not taking ?
is she/he/it not taking ?
are we not taking ?
are you not taking ?
are they not taking ?
Past simple continuous
was I not taking ?
were you not taking ?
was she/he/it not taking ?
were we not taking ?
were you not taking ?
were they not taking ?
Future continuous
will I not be taking ?
will you not be taking ?
will she/he/it not be taking ?
will we not be taking ?
will you not be taking ?
will they not be taking ?
Future perfect continuous
will I not have been taking ?
will you not have been taking ?
will she/he/it not have been taking ?
will we not have been taking ?
will you not have been taking ?
will they not have been taking ?
Present perfect continuous
have I not been taking ?
have you not been taking ?
has she/he/it not been taking ?
have we not been taking ?
have you not been taking ?
have they not been taking ?
Past perfect continuous
had I not been taking ?
had you not been taking ?
had she/he/it not been taking ?
had we not been taking ?
had you not been taking ?
had they not been taking ?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not take ?
That do you not take ?
That does she/he/it not take ?
That do we not take ?
That do you not take ?
That do they not take ?
Present perfect
That have I not taken ?
That have you not taken ?
That have she/he/it not taken ?
That have we not taken ?
That have you not taken ?
That have they not taken ?
Simple past
That did I not take ?
That did you not take ?
That did she/he/it not take ?
That did we not take ?
That did you not take ?
That did they not take ?
Past perfect
That had I not taken ?
That had you not taken ?
That had she/he/it not taken ?
That had we not taken ?
That had you not taken ?
That had they not taken ?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not take ?
would you not take ?
would she/he/it not take ?
would we not take ?
would you not take ?
would they not take ?
Past
would I not have taken?
would you not have taken?
would she/he/it not have taken?
would we not have taken?
would you not have taken?
would they not have taken?
Present continous
would I not be taking ?
would you not be taking ?
would she/he/it not be taking ?
would we not be taking ?
would you not be taking ?
would they not be taking ?
Past continous
would I not have been taking?
would you not have been taking?
would she/he/it not have been taking?
would we not have been taking?
would you not have been taking?
would they not have been taking?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present