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Italiano
Vocabolario e frasi
invescare
= verbo transitivo , invischiare
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rinvischiare
= verbo trans. invischiare nuovamente
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rinvischiarsi
= verbo riflessivo invischiarsi nuovamente.
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Inglese
Vocabolario e frasi
(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But I hope you will get over it, and live to see many young men of fourthousand a year come into the neighbourhood.<>
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The business of her life was to get herdaughters married; its solace was visiting and news (Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Chapter 2Mr. Bennet was among the earliest of those who waited on Mr. Bingley.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Your plan is a good one," replied Elizabeth, "where nothing is inquestion but the desire of being well married, and if I were determinedto get a rich husband, or any husband, I dare say I should adopt it.<>
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When they get to our age, I dare say they willnot think about officers any more than we do.<>
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They arewanted in the farm, Mr. Bennet, are they not?""They are wanted in the farm much oftener than I can get them.<>
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The apothecary came, and havingexamined his patient, said, as might be supposed, that she had caughta violent cold, and that they must endeavour to get the better of it;advised her to return to bed, and promised her some draughts.<>
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Her answer, therefore, was not propitious, atleast not to Elizabeth's wishes, for she was impatient to get home.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Lydia's intention of walking to Meryton was not forgotten; every sisterexcept Mary agreed to go with her; and Mr. Collins was to attend them,at the request of Mr. Bennet, who was most anxious to get rid of him,and have his library to himself; for thither Mr. Collins had followedhim after breakfast; and there he would continue, nominally engaged withone of the largest folios in the collection, but really talking to Mr.Bennet, with little cessation, of his house and garden at Hunsford.<>
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"I do not get on at all.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth would not oppose such an injunction--and a moment'sconsideration making her also sensible that it would be wisest to get itover as soon and as quietly as possible, she sat down again and tried toconceal, by incessant employment the feelings which were divided betweendistress and diversion.<>
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But I tell you, Miss Lizzy--if you take itinto your head to go on refusing every offer of marriage in this way,you will never get a husband at all--and I am sure I do not know who isto maintain you when your father is dead.<>
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But thecase is this: We are not rich enough or grand enough for them; and sheis the more anxious to get Miss Darcy for her brother, from the notionthat when there has been one intermarriage, she may have less troublein achieving a second; in which there is certainly some ingenuity, andI dare say it would succeed, if Miss de Bourgh were out of the way.<>
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Alittle time, therefore--I shall certainly try to get the better.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) I am always glad to get a young person well placed out.<>
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She not unfrequently stopped at the Parsonage, andhad a few minutes' conversation with Charlotte, but was scarcely everprevailed upon to get out.<>
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Her ladyship receivedthem civilly, but it was plain that their company was by no means soacceptable as when she could get nobody else; and she was, in fact,almost engrossed by her nephews, speaking to them, especially to Darcy,much more than to any other person in the room.<>
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How does Georgiana get on, Darcy?"Mr. Darcy spoke with affectionate praise of his sister's proficiency.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "If he means to be but little at Netherfield, it would be better forthe neighbourhood that he should give up the place entirely, for then wemight possibly get a settled family there.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "What is it you mean?""It is a circumstance which Darcy could not wish to be generally known,because if it were to get round to the lady's family, it would be anunpleasant thing.<>
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What he told me was merely this: that he congratulated himselfon having lately saved a friend from the inconveniences of a mostimprudent marriage, but without mentioning names or any otherparticulars, and I only suspected it to be Bingley from believinghim the kind of young man to get into a scrape of that sort, and fromknowing them to have been together the whole of last summer.<>
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I shallpull it to pieces as soon as I get home, and see if I can make it up anybetter.<>
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Miss Darcy, on her brother'sentrance, exerted herself much more to talk, and Elizabeth saw that hewas anxious for his sister and herself to get acquainted, and forwardedas much as possible, every attempt at conversation on either side.<>
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Is there nothing you could take to give youpresent relief? A glass of wine; shall I get you one? You are very ill.<>
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As soon as I get to town I shall go to my brother, and makehim come home with me to Gracechurch Street; and then we may consulttogether as to what is to be done.<>
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And now do, when you get to town, find them out,wherever they may be; and if they are not married already, make themmarry.<>
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Tell him what a dreadful state I am in, that I am frighted out of mywits--and have such tremblings, such flutterings, all over me--suchspasms in my side and pains in my head, and such beatings at heart, thatI can get no rest by night nor by day.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) I shallsend for my clothes when I get to Longbourn; but I wish you would tellSally to mend a great slit in my worked muslin gown before they arepacked up.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Away ran the girls, too eager to get in to have time for speech.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "May we take my uncle's letter to read to her?""Take whatever you like, and get away.<>
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Weshall be at Newcastle all the winter, and I dare say there will be someballs, and I will take care to get good partners for them all.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "And then when you go away, you may leave one or two of my sistersbehind you; and I dare say I shall get husbands for them before thewinter is over.<>
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And then, you know, when oncethey get together, there is no end of it.<>
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But it was two or three days before he could get from her what hewanted.<>
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Proud that in a causeof compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) They were now almost at the door of the house, for she had walked fastto get rid of him; and unwilling, for her sister's sake, to provoke him,she only said in reply, with a good-humoured smile:"Come, Mr. Wickham, we are brother and sister, you know.<>
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Bennet, in short, was in very great spirits; she had seen enough ofBingley's behaviour to Jane, to be convinced that she would get him atlast; and her expectations of advantage to her family, when in a happyhumour, were so far beyond reason, that she was quite disappointed atnot seeing him there again the next day, to make his proposals.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) The same anxiety to get them by themselves was visible again in theevening.<>
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" Then addressing her daughter, "Oh! my dear, dear Jane, I am sohappy! I am sure I shan't get a wink of sleep all night.<>
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As she wentup stairs to get ready, Mrs.<>
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She began at length to recover, to fidget about inher chair, get up, sit down again, wonder, and bless herself.<>
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Lady Catherine had been renderedso exceedingly angry by the contents of her nephew's letter, thatCharlotte, really rejoicing in the match, was anxious to get away tillthe storm was blown over.<>
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Like a general postman's coat--queercoats those--made by contract--no measuring--mysterious dispensationsof Providence--all the short men get long coats--all the long men shortones.<>
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His new friend departed; and, afterexperiencing some slight difficulty in finding the orifice in hisnightcap, originally intended for the reception of his head, and finallyoverturning his candlestick in his struggles to put it on, Mr. TracyTupman managed to get into bed by a series of complicated evolutions,and shortly afterwards sank into repose.<>
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I promised to comply, as soon as I could get away; and afterthe curtain fell, sallied forth on my melancholy errand.<>
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The best way is tokeep gently up with the object of pursuit, to be wary and cautious, towatch your opportunity well, get gradually before it, then make a rapiddive, seize it by the crown, and stick it firmly on your head; smilingpleasantly all the time, as if you thought it as good a joke as anybodyelse.<>
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The 'poor fellow' was proof against flattery; the moreMr. Winkle tried to get nearer him, the more he sidled away; and,notwithstanding all kinds of coaxing and wheedling, there were Mr.Winkle and the horse going round and round each other for ten minutes,at the end of which time each was at precisely the same distance fromthe other as when they first commenced--an unsatisfactory sort of thingunder any circumstances, but particularly so in a lonely road, where noassistance can be procured.<>
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What am I to do? I can't get onhim.<>
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Played a match once--singlewicket--friend the colonel--Sir Thomas Blazo--who should get thegreatest number of runs.<>
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Put the horse in the gig! I'll get a chaise atthe Lion, and follow 'em instantly.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Let me get at him, Pickwick,' cried Wardle, as he rushed at theill-starred youth.<>
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) 'Let me get athim!Don't let him!' screamed all the women, above whose exclamations theblubbering of the fat boy was distinctly audible.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'So much the worse,' returned Wardle; 'for they'll have had all theadvantage of the moonlight to get the start of us, and we shall lose it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Ha! ha!' replied Jingle; and then he added, with a knowing wink, and ajerk of the thumb towards the interior of the chaise--'I say--she's verywell--desires her compliments--begs you won't trouble yourself--love toTUPPY--won't you get up behind?--drive on, boys.<>
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He drew his breath hard, and coloured up to the very tips of hisspectacles, as he said, slowly and emphatically--'If ever I meet that man again, I'll--Yes, yes,' interrupted Wardle, 'that's all very well; but whilewe stand talking here, they'll get their licence, and be married inLondon.<>
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We eats our biled mutton without capers, anddon't care for horse-radish ven ve can get beef.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll make it payable the day after to-morrow,' said the littleman, with a look towards Mr. Wardle; 'and we can get the lady away,meanwhile.<>
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If I had not beenmad--for though we madmen are sharp-witted enough, we get bewilderedsometimes--I should have known that the girl would rather have beenplaced, stiff and cold in a dull leaden coffin, than borne an enviedbride to my rich, glittering house.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I remember--though it's one of the last things I can remember: for nowI mix up realities with my dreams, and having so much to do, and beingalways hurried here, have no time to separate the two, from some strangeconfusion in which they get involved--I remember how I let it out atlast.<>
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Mr. Pickwick was going to propose--a deliberate plan,too--sent her little boy to the Borough, to get him out of the way--howthoughtful--how considerate!'Well,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'what do you think?Oh, Mr. Pickwick,' said Mrs.<>
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You can get a character of course?' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Can you come this evening?I'll get into the clothes this minute, if they're here,' said Sam, withgreat alacrity.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, then, draw that little table into this window, and let me get outof hearing of those prosy politics.<>
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So, after deliberating over the two last tumblers, whether he hadn't aperfect right to pick a quarrel with the tall man for having contrivedto get into the good graces of the buxom widow, Tom Smart at lastarrived at the satisfactory conclusion that he was a very ill-used andpersecuted individual, and had better go to bed.<>
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Leo Hunter's recitation ofher far-famed 'Ode to an Expiring Frog,' which was encored once, andwould have been encored twice, if the major part of the guests, whothought it was high time to get something to eat, had not said that itwas perfectly shameful to take advantage of Mrs.<>
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Consequence is, that being thoroughly waked, they get upwery quietly, and walk away! Beg your pardon, sir,' said Sam, suddenlybreaking off in his loquacious discourse.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Now, sir,' argued Mr. Weller, when he had concluded his report, 'if Ican get a talk with this here servant in the mornin', he'll tell me allhis master's concerns.<>
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How am I to get into it?The wall is very low, sir, and your servant will give you a leg up.<>
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You turn a little to the right when you get to theend of the town; it stands by itself, some little distance off the highroad, with the name on a brass plate on the gate.<>
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If the gentleman begins to fire now, perhaps he'lljust get the shot out of the barrel by the time they rise.<>
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Ah,' said the old gentleman, smiling, 'you'll get used to it in time.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Never mind, Sir, never mind,' replied the long gamekeeper; 'I'veno family myself, sir; and this here boy's mother will get somethinghandsome from Sir Geoffrey, if he's killed on his land.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll tell you what I shall do, to get up my shooting again,' said Mr.Winkle, who was eating bread and ham with a pocket-knife.<>
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I'll give directions for the commencement of an action for falseimprisonment against this Captain Boldwig, directly I get to London,'said Mr. Pickwick, as soon as the carriage turned out of the town.<>
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I should get the sack, I s'pose--eh?'At this humorous notion, all the clerks laughed in concert.<>
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" "I can't get it, by God!" said Ramsey, striking the deskwith his fist.<>
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"You are," saidFogg; "get out, sir; get out of this office, Sir, and come back, Sir,when you know how to behave yourself.<>
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The costs are quite safe, for he's asteady man with a large family, at a salary of five-and-twenty shillingsa week, and if he gives us a warrant of attorney, as he must in the end,I know his employers will see it paid; so we may as well get all we canget out of him, Mr. Wicks; it's a Christian act to do it, Mr. Wicks, forwith his large family and small income, he'll be all the better fora good lesson against getting into debt--won't he, Mr. Wicks, won'the?"--and he smiled so good-naturedly as he went away, that it wasdelightful to see him.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'This is pleasant, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'I shouldn't lose an hourin seeing him; I shall not be able to get one wink of sleep to-night, Iknow, unless I have the satisfaction of reflecting that I have confidedthis matter to a professional man.<>
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Now, will you get up?' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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I cannot consent to get up, in this state of uncertainty.<>
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The very idea of exhibiting his nightcap to a lady overpoweredhim, but he had tied those confounded strings in a knot, and, do whathe would, he couldn't get it off.<>
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Now it's timeI was up at the office to get my vay-bill and see the coach loaded; forcoaches, Sammy, is like guns--they requires to be loaded with wery greatcare, afore they go off.<>
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As the green gate wasclosed behind him, and there was no other outlet but the one in front,however, he was not long in perceiving that he must pass Mr. SamuelWeller to get away.<>
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The unfortunate Grummer proceeded to re-state his complaint, but, whatbetween Mr. Jinks's taking down his words, and the magistrate's takingthem up, his natural tendency to rambling, and his extreme confusion,he managed to get involved, in something under three minutes, in sucha mass of entanglement and contradiction, that Mr. Nupkins at oncedeclared he didn't believe him.<>
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If it appeared that hehad spoken truly, the captain could be turned out of the house withoutnoising the matter abroad, and they could easily account to thePorkenhams for his disappearance, by saying that he had been appointed,through the Court influence of his family, to the governor-generalshipof Sierra Leone, of Saugur Point, or any other of those salubriousclimates which enchant Europeans so much, that when they once get there,they can hardly ever prevail upon themselves to come back again.<>
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You couldn't get at it without shuttingthe door first.<>
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Bardell said this, she applied her handkerchief to her eyes, andwent out of the room to get the receipt.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'But the plaintiff must get it,' resumed Mrs.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Vell,' said Sam, rising and setting down his glass, 'all I can say is,that I vish you MAY get it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Amen to that,' replied Sam, 'and a fat and happy liven' they'd get outof it! Wish you good-night, ladies.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Wery glad to see you, Sammy,' said the elder Mr. Weller, 'though howyou've managed to get over your mother-in-law, is a mystery to me.<>
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The guardand Mr. Weller disappear for five minutes, most probably to get the hotbrandy-and-water, for they smell very strongly of it, when theyreturn, the coachman mounts to the box, Mr. Weller jumps up behind, thePickwickians pull their coats round their legs and their shawls overtheir noses, the helpers pull the horse-cloths off, the coachman shoutsout a cheery 'All right,' and away they go.<>
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Thecoachman throws down the reins and gets down himself, and the otheroutside passengers drop down also; except those who have no greatconfidence in their ability to get up again; and they remain where theyare, and stamp their feet against the coach to warm them--looking, withlonging eyes and red noses, at the bright fire in the inn bar, and thesprigs of holly with red berries which ornament the window.<>
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The coachmanshouts an admonitory 'Now then, gen'l'm'n,' the guard re-echoes it; theold gentleman inside thinks it a very extraordinary thing that peopleWILL get down when they know there isn't time for it; Mr. Pickwickstruggles up on one side, Mr. Tupman on the other; Mr. Winkle cries'All right'; and off they start.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) At dinner they met again, after a five-and-twenty mile walk, undertakenby the males at Wardle's recommendation, to get rid of the effects ofthe wine at breakfast.<>
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"Well," says he, "I should like to see the thief ascould get this here watch out, for I'm blessed if I ever can, it's sucha tight fit," says he, "and wenever I vants to know what's o'clock, I'mobliged to stare into the bakers' shops," he says.<>
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And wen he come straight agin,the watch and chain was gone, and what's worse than that, the oldgen'l'm'n's digestion was all wrong ever afterwards, to the wery lastday of his life; so just you look about you, young feller, and take careyou don't get too fat.<>
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I shall soon get in the way of it, Sam.<>
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The clay upon so much of Mr. Pickwick's coat as was yet visible, boretestimony to the accuracy of this statement; and as the fears ofthe spectators were still further relieved by the fat boy's suddenlyrecollecting that the water was nowhere more than five feet deep,prodigies of valour were performed to get him out.<>
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It don't matter much, though; Idon't think many counsel could get a great deal out of HIM.<>
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I ain't a-goin' to get married, don't you fretyourself about that; I know you're a judge of these things.<>
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There!'We cannot distinctly say whether it was the prospect of the pipe, or theconsolatory reflection that a fatal disposition to get married ran inthe family, and couldn't be helped, which calmed Mr. Weller's feelings,and caused his grief to subside.<>
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Verever he's a-goin' to be tried, my boy, a alleybi's the thingto get him off.<>
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Now, these here fellows, myboy, are a-goin' to-night to get up the monthly meetin' o' theBrick Lane Branch o' the United Grand Junction Ebenezer TemperanceAssociation.<>
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Agood, contented, well-breakfasted juryman is a capital thing to get holdof.<>
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" Upon this, two or three other men are sure to saythat they think so too--as of course they do; and then they get on veryunanimously and comfortably.<>
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Whether hedid get anything important out of him, will immediately appear.<>
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Oh, you do remember that, Mr. Weller,' said Serjeant Buzfuz, recoveringhis spirits; 'I thought we should get at something at last.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I went up to pay the rent; but we did get a-talkin' about the trial,'replied Sam.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Oh, you did get a-talking about the trial,' said Serjeant Buzfuz,brightening up with the anticipation of some important discovery.<>
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It's perfectly useless, my Lord, attempting to get at anyevidence through the impenetrable stupidity of this witness.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You imagine you'll get your costs, don't you, gentlemen?' said Mr.Pickwick.<>
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Dodson and Fogg,' saidMr. Pickwick vehemently,'but not one farthing of costs or damages doyou ever get from me, if I spend the rest of my existence in a debtor'sprison.<>
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Having taken a shortwalk through the city, and arrived at the unanimous conclusion thatPark Street was very much like the perpendicular streets a man sees in adream, which he cannot get up for the life of him, they returned to theWhite Hart, and despatched Sam on the errand to which his master hadpledged him.<>
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There is alarge bar with a marble vase, out of which the pumper gets the water;and there are a number of yellow-looking tumblers, out of which thecompany get it; and it is a most edifying and satisfactory sight tobehold the perseverance and gravity with which they swallow it.<>
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He might have endeavoured to break her heart bya systematic course of insult and neglect; or, if the spirit of her sex,and a proud consciousness of her many wrongs had upheld her under thisill-treatment, he might have sought to take her life, and so get rid ofher effectually.<>
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The short man was quite willing to get the job over, as soon aspossible; so he stood on the step, and gave four or five most startlingdouble-knocks, of eight or ten knocks a-piece, while the long man wentinto the road, and looked up at the windows for a light.<>
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The man withthe cocked hat breathed short, and looked long at Sam, but apparentlythought it as well to say nothing, in case he should get the worst ofit.<>
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As to the wictim of oppression in thesuit o' brimstone, all I can say of him, is, that I hope he'll get jistas good a berth as he deserves; in vitch case it's wery little coldswarry as ever he'll be troubled with agin.<>
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Getout, you mouldy old villain, get out!' With this adjuration, which wasaddressed to the large book, the medical gentleman kicked the volumewith remarkable agility to the farther end of the shop, and, pullingoff his green spectacles, grinned the identical grin of Robert Sawyer,Esquire, formerly of Guy's Hospital in the Borough, with a privateresidence in Lant Street.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'O' course I came to look arter you, my darlin',' replied Mr. Weller;for once permitting his passion to get the better of his veracity.<>
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Well, miss,' said Sam, 'he's heerd all about it from him; and it's thegov'nor's opinion that if you don't see him wery quick, the sawbones aswe've been a-speakin' on, 'ull get as much extra lead in his head as'llrayther damage the dewelopment o' the orgins if they ever put it inspirits artervards.<>
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Steady, sir, steady! That's the time o' day!'As Sam spoke, Mr. Pickwick, by exertions almost supernatural in agentleman of his years and weight, contrived to get upon Sam's back; andSam gently raising himself up, and Mr. Pickwick holding on fast by thetop of the wall, while Mr. Winkle clasped him tight by the legs, theycontrived by these means to bring his spectacles just above the level ofthe coping.<>
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He was up again in an instant however; and bidding Mr. Winkle make hasteand get the interview over, ran out into the lane to keep watch, withall the courage and ardour of youth.<>
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Stop, stop, my dear Sir; not the least occasion for being in such aviolent hurry to get into a place that most other men are as eager toget out of,' said the good-natured little attorney.<>
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Every time this door was opened to let a party out, the nextparty made a violent rush to get in; and, as in addition to the numerousdialogues which passed between the gentlemen who were waiting to see thejudge, a variety of personal squabbles ensued between the greater partof those who had seen him, there was as much noise as could well beraised in an apartment of such confined dimensions.<>
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There were alarge number of attorneys' clerks to be sworn, and it being a moralimpossibility to swear them all at once, the struggles of thesegentlemen to reach the clerk in spectacles, were like those of a crowdto get in at the pit door of a theatre when Gracious Majesty honours itwith its presence.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) All this time, the man in the spectacles was hard at work, swearing theclerks; the oath being invariably administered, without any effort atpunctuation, and usually in the following terms:--'Take the book in your right hand this is your name and hand-writing youswear that the contents of this your affidavit are true so help you Goda shilling you must get change I haven't got it.<>
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As soon as I get settled, I will write and let youknow, and I shall expect you immediately.<>
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The turnkeytakes a fixed look at him, and at last he says in a solemn manner,"Tventy," he says, "I'll trust you; you Won't get your old friend intotrouble.<>
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Atlast he began to get so precious jolly, that he used to forget how thetime vent, or care nothin' at all about it, and he went on gettin'later and later, till vun night his old friend wos just a-shuttin' thegate--had turned the key in fact--wen he come up.<>
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Then knock him downstairs, and tell him notto presume to get up till I come and kick him,' rejoined Mr. Mivins;with this prompt advice that excellent gentleman again betook himself toslumber.<>
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I shall get up,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'give me some clean things.<>
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You're a man of talent; you can get anybody through the Insolvent Court,Pell; and your country should be proud of you.<>
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But,' continued the cobbler, 'finding that they couldn't agree amongthemselves, and consequently couldn't get up a case against the will,they withdrew the caveat, and I paid all the legacies.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'He won't be a Chancery prisoner wery long, Sir,' replied Roker, turninghis hat round, so as to get the maker's name right side upwards, as helooked into it.<>
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Then he opened the paper, and folded itso as to get the police reports outwards; and this being a vexatious anddifficult thing to do, when there is any wind stirring, he took anotherdraught of the beer when he had accomplished it.<>
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I drove the old piebald in that 'ere littleshay-cart as belonged to your mother-in-law's first wenter, into vicha harm-cheer wos lifted for the shepherd; and I'm blessed,' said Mr.Weller, with a look of deep scorn--'I'm blessed if they didn't bring aportable flight o' steps out into the road a-front o' our door for him,to get up by.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I do mean that, Sammy,' replied his father, 'and I vish you could ha'seen how tight he held on by the sides wen he did get up, as if he wosafeerd o' being precipitayted down full six foot, and dashed into amillion hatoms.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'If I don't get no better light than that 'ere moonshine o' yourn, myworthy creetur,' said the elder Mr. Weller, 'it's wery likely as I shallcontiney to be a night coach till I'm took off the road altogether.<>
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Yes,' replied Job; 'but these sort of things are not so easilycounterfeited, Mr. Weller, and it is a more painful process to get themup.<>
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She'll never get better as long as you're here.<>
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Bardell prepared to get in, looking up atthe man with the ash stick, who was seated on the box, smoking a cigar.<>
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I'm very sorry they can't get them,' replied Mrs.<>
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But if youlaw gentlemen do these things on speculation, why you must get a lossnow and then, you know.<>
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You can't get in to-night;you've got the key of the street, my friend.<>
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I cannot undertake to say, at this moment,whether the wording of the cognovit, the nature of the ostensibleconsideration, and the proof we can get together about the whole conductof the suit, will be sufficient to justify an indictment for conspiracy.<>
---------------
I don't quite recollect how many tumblers ofwhiskey-toddy each man drank after supper; but this I know, that aboutone o'clock in the morning, the bailie's grown-up son became insensiblewhile attempting the first verse of "Willie brewed a peck o' maut";and he having been, for half an hour before, the only other man visibleabove the mahogany, it occurred to my uncle that it was almost time tothink about going, especially as drinking had set in at seven o'clock,in order that he might get home at a decent hour.<>
---------------
You'd better get in.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) '"Now, are you going to get in?" said the person who had addressed myuncle before.<>
---------------
"ARE you going to get in, Jack Martin?" said theguard, holding the lantern to my uncle's face.<>
---------------
Let them get in first.<>
---------------
She had no bonneton her head, gentlemen, which was muffled in a black silk hood, but shelooked round for an instant as she prepared to get into the coach, andsuch a beautiful face as she disclosed, my uncle had never seen--noteven in a picture.<>
---------------
"'"Must I get down?" inquired my uncle.<>
---------------
Wery good little dinner, sir, they can get readyin half an hour--pair of fowls, sir, and a weal cutlet; French beans,'taturs, tart, and tidiness.<>
---------------
Coachman, I get down here.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Dear ME I vish it vos, my dear,' replied Sam, dropping behind, to lethis master get out of hearing.<>
---------------
Lor, do get along with you.<>
---------------
If I waslocked up in a fireproof chest vith a patent Brahmin, she'd find meansto get at me, Sammy.<>
---------------
I'll run out presently,and get a bottle of soda.<>
---------------
About gettingthat customer that we paid the ten shillings in the pound to thebill-discounter for, on your account--to get him out of the Fleet, youknow--about getting him to Demerara.<>
---------------
He said he must go alongwith the other one, and so they persuaded Perker to write again, andthey've got him something on the same estate; not near so good, Perkersays, as a convict would get in New South Wales, if he appeared at histrial in a new suit of clothes.<>
---------------
Arabella wrote,the day before yesterday, to say she had made a stolen match without herhusband's father's consent, and so you had gone down to get it whenhis refusing it couldn't prevent the match, and all the rest of it.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well then,' said Perker, rising and pushing his chair back, 'my adviceis, that you both walk away together, or ride away, or get away by somemeans or other, for I'm tired of you, and just talk this matter overbetween you.<>
---------------
If I couldn't get into it easier than that, I'm blessed if I'd vear vunat all,' rejoined his son.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You think so now,' said Mr. Weller, with the gravity of age, 'butyou'll find that as you get vider, you'll get viser.<>
---------------
As Mr. Weller delivered this infallible maxim--the result of many years'personal experience and observation--he contrived, by a dexterous twistof his body, to get the bottom button of his coat to perform its office.<>
---------------
Science is agrand thing when you can get it; in its real sense one of the grandestwords in the world.<>
---------------
I try to get inside the murderer.<>
---------------
For all that, I'd never deny that weoften tend to get into a rut: or, in other words, have the disadvantagesof going by a rule.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "An interviewer might very well get over the wall," he said, "for Icouldn't make anybody hear at the front door.<>
---------------
If he lets himself go likethat, it's because he thinks he can get a conviction, anyhow, and wantsto put himself at the head of some political movement against theconspiracy he talks about.<>
---------------
"what wasit?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "You said," observed the priest, "that Sir Arthur must have some goodreason for wanting to get Orm hanged.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I'll get her to give an eye to them," answered the secretary.<>
---------------
"Suspecting Smith, I wanted to get him out of the way and go through hisbelongings; so I took advantage of Mr. Bankes's kindness in giving him ajoy ride.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Always satisfactory to get a case really rounded off.<>
---------------
He would have found it hard to get such things anywherein the time.<>
---------------
"It all depends on who's trying to get in.<>
---------------
You won't get out of thereanyhow,' he said vindictively.<>
---------------
It illustrates how the wise man can get behind timeand space and turn the levers of them, so to speak, so that the wholeworld turns round before our eyes.<>
---------------
And I suppose it's true that there was timefor him to get outside before I had fully woken up and got out on to thebalcony.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "We are beginning to get a little alarmed," said old Randall.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "In that case," said Mandeville, "we can only get on with rehearsing thescenes where she doesn't appear.<>
---------------
You had better get on with that.<>
---------------
She has the very highest ideals of the drama, you know; but,of course, it isn't often she can get her lord and master to look atanything in that light.<>
---------------
It is a guess; but I fancy if it had been adress rehearsal it might have been more difficult to get through a trap-door in the hoops of the eighteenth century.<>
---------------
Can't you get rid of her? Ask her totelephone or something; and then come back here again.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "What a horrible tale of hatred! What a vengeance for one mortal worm totake on another! Shall we ever get to the bottom of this bottomlesshuman heart, where such abominable imaginations can abide? God save usall from pride; but I cannot yet make any picture in my mind of hate andvengeance like that.<>
---------------
Vaudrey remembered the silly insult for years and years, till hecould get the Oriental into the improbable neighbourhood of a pig-sty;and then he took, what he considered the only appropriate and artisticrevenge.<>
---------------
Well, he couldn't sayfairer than that, could he? But he's so anxious to get the thing settledthat he offered to take me up in his own car to Musgrave Moss.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "He would have told you plainly that the Captain would never get apenny," said Father Brown.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "If they are," said Father Brown mildly, "it seems rather unnecessary togo into the middle of Asia to get one.<>
---------------
He didn't often come; he didn't get on withMounteagle, from whom, being a spendthrift, he always tried to borrow;but when he heard the Master was coming, he came hurrying down.<>
---------------
He longed to get away.<>
---------------
Here's a man that might have been useful to the Empire andthe world, and these vampires get hold of him and suck him dry.<>
---------------
Would you let anything stand between you and thefacts that would refute him? Wouldn't you get on the track of the truthat all costs to anybody? Well, I have a regiment, and I belong to anarmy.<>
---------------
Heslipped along the coast till he came to a port and managed to get out ofthe country.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "It's about all the Christian charity you'll ever get out of thesepriests," cried Cockspur bitterly.<>
---------------
Youcan get nearer to it.<>
---------------
allow the situation to get worse
= lasciar peggiorare la situazione ,
---------------
allowed the situation to get worse
= lasciato peggiorare la situazione ,
---------------
allowing the situation to get worse
= lasciando peggiorare la situazione ,
---------------
allows the situation to get worse
= lascia peggiorare la situazione ,
---------------
come and get it
= è pronto! a tavola! venite a tavola! ,
---------------
crying isn't going to get you anyplace
= piangere non ti porterà a niente ,
---------------
crying isn't going to get you anywhere
= piangere non ti porterà a niente ,
---------------
did you get my letter
= hai ricevuto la mia lettera? ,
---------------
did you get the drift of the conversation
= hai colto il senso del discorso? ,
---------------
did you get the look on his face
= hai notato che aspetto aveva? ,
---------------
did you get through the exam
= hai superato l'esame? ,
---------------
don't cross your bridges before you get to them
= non bisogna fasciarsi la testa prima d'essersela rotta ,
---------------
don't get away from the point
= stai al punto! non divagare! ,
---------------
don't get funny with me
= non fare il furbo con me! ,
---------------
don't get into a panic
= non farti prendere dal panico ,
---------------
don't get into trouble
= non metterti nei guai! ,
---------------
don't get me wrong
= non fraintendermi! ,
---------------
don't get mixed up in shady dealings
= non immischiarti in affari loschi ,
---------------
don't get mixed up with shady dealings
= non immischiarti in affari loschi ,
---------------
don't try to get round the law
= non cercare di eludere la legge ,
---------------
i am afraid drinking will get
= temo che il vizio del bere avrà il sopravvento su,
---------------
i am afraid drinking will get him
= temo che il vizio del bere avrà il sopravvento su di lui,
---------------
i'd do anything to get that job
= farei qualsiasi cosa per avere quel lavoro,
---------------
i'd give anything to get that job
= farei qualsiasi cosa per avere quel lavoro,
---------------
it takes ages to get it right
= ci vuole una vita per farlo bene,
---------------
it takes an age to get it right
= ci vuole una vita per farlo bene,
---------------
let's get back to the basics
= torniamo ai punti fondamentali,
---------------
let's get down to bedrock
= veniamo al sodo,
---------------
let's sit down and get cool
= sediamoci a prendere il fresco,
---------------
mget
= multiple get , mget,
---------------
not to get anywhere
= non approdare a nulla,
---------------
thrilled as all get out
= eccitato da matti ,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - invischiare
Ausiliare:avere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io invischio
tu invischi
egli invischia
noi invischiamo
voi invischiate
essi invischiano
Imperfetto
io invischiavo
tu invischiavi
egli invischiava
noi invischiavamo
voi invischiavate
essi invischiavano
Passato remoto
io invischiai
tu invischiasti
egli invischiò
noi invischiammo
voi invischiaste
essi invischiarono
Passato prossimo
io ho invischiato
tu hai invischiato
egli ha invischiato
noi abbiamo invischiato
voi avete invischiato
essi hanno invischiato
Trapassato prossimo
io avevo invischiato
tu avevi invischiato
egli aveva invischiato
noi avevamo invischiato
voi avevate invischiato
essi avevano invischiato
Trapassato remoto
io ebbi invischiato
tu avesti invischiato
egli ebbe invischiato
noi avemmo invischiato
voi eveste invischiato
essi ebbero invischiato
Futuro semplice
io invischierò
tu invischierai
egli invischierà
noi invischieremo
voi invischierete
essi invischieranno
Futuro anteriore
io avrò invischiato
tu avrai invischiato
egli avrà invischiato
noi avremo invischiato
voi avrete invischiato
essi avranno invischiato
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io invischi
che tu invischi
che egli invischi
che noi invischiamo
che voi invischiate
che essi invischino
Passato
che io abbia invischiato
che tu abbia invischiato
che egli abbia invischiato
che noi abbiamo invischiato
che voi abbiate invischiato
che essi abbiano invischiato
Imperfetto
che io invischiassi
che tu invischiassi
che egli invischiasse
che noi invischiassimo
che voi invischiaste
che essi invischiassero
Trapassato
che io avessi invischiato
che tu avessi invischiato
che egli avesse invischiato
che noi avessimo invischiato
che voi aveste invischiato
che essi avessero invischiato
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io invischierei
tu invischieresti
egli invischierebbe
noi invischieremmo
voi invischiereste
essi invischierebbero
Passato
io avrei invischiato
tu avresti invischiato
egli avrebbe invischiato
noi avremmo invischiato
voi avreste invischiato
essi avrebbero invischiato
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
invischia
invischi
invischiamo
invischiate
invischino
Futuro
-
invischierai
invischierà
invischieremo
invischierete
invischieranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
invischiar
Passato
essersi invischiato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
invischiante
Passato
invischiato
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
invischiando
Passato
avendo invischiato
Verb: to get-got-got
Ausiliar: to have - transitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I get involved
you get involved
he/she/it gets involved
we get involved
you get involved
they get involved
Simple past
I got involved
you got involved
he/she/it got involved
we got involved
you got involved
they got involved
Simple past
I got involved
you got involved
he/she/it got involved
we got involved
you got involved
they got involved
Present perfect
I have got involved
you have got involved
he/she/it has got involved
we have got involved
you have got involved
they have got involved
Past perfect
I had got involved
you had got involved
he/she/it had got involved
we had got involved
you had got involved
they had got involved
Past perfect
I had got involved
you had got involved
he/she/it had got involved
we had got involved
you had got involved
they had got involved
Simple future
I will get involved
you will get involved
he/she/it will get involved
we will get involved
you will get involved
they will get involved
Future perfect
I will have got involved
you will have got involved
he/she/it will have got involved
we will have got involved
you will have got involved
they will have got involved
Present continuous
I am getting involved
you are getting involved
he/she/it is getting involved
we are getting involved
you are getting involved
they are getting involved
Past simple continuous
I was getting involved
you were getting involved
he/she/it was getting involved
we were getting involved
you were getting involved
they were getting involved
Future continuous
I will be getting involved
you will be getting involved
he/she/it will be getting involved
we will be getting involved
you will be getting involved
they will be getting involved
Future perfect continuous
I will have been getting involved
you will have been getting involved
he/she/it will have been getting involved
we will have been getting involved
you will have been getting involved
they will have been getting involved
Present perfect continuous
I have been getting involved
you have been getting involved
he/she/it has been getting involved
we have been getting involved
you have been getting involved
they have been getting involved
Past perfect continuous
I had been getting involved
you had been getting involved
he/she/it had been getting involved
we had been getting involved
you had been getting involved
they had been getting involved
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I get involved
That you get involved
That he/she/it get involved
That we get involved
That you get involved
That they get involved
Present perfect
That I have got involved
That you have got involved
That he/she/it have got involved
That we have got involved
That you have got involved
That they have got involved
Simple past
That I got involved
That you got involved
That he/she/it got involved
That we got involved
That you got involved
That they got involved
Past perfect
That I had got involved
That you had got involved
That he/she/it had got involved
That we had got involved
That you had got involved
That they had got involved
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would get involved
you would get involved
we would get involved
we would get involved
you would get involved
they would get involved
Past
I would have got
you would have got
he/she/it would have got
we would have got
you would have got
they would have got
Present continous
I would be getting involved
you would be getting involved
we would be getting involved
we would be getting involved
you would be getting involved
they would be getting involved
Past continous
I would have been getting
you would have been getting
he/she/it would have been getting
we would have been getting
you would have been getting
they would have been getting
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
let me get involved
get involved
let him get involved
let us get involved
get involved
let them get involved
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to get
Past
to have got
Present continous
to be getting
Perfect continous
to have been getting
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
getting
Past
got
Perfect
having got
Affermative - GERUND
Present
getting
Past
having got
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do not get involved
you do not get involved
he/she/it does not gets involved
we do not get involved
you do not get involved
they do not get involved
Simple past
I did not get involved
you did not get involved
he/she/it did not get involved
we did not get involved
you did not get involved
they did not get involved
Simple past
I did not get involved
you did not get involved
he/she/it did not get involved
we did not get involved
you did not get involved
they did not get involved
Present perfect
I have not got involved
you have not got involved
he/she/it has not got involved
we have not got involved
you have not got involved
they have not got involved
Past perfect
I had not got involved
you had not got involved
he/she/it had not got involved
we had not got involved
you had not got involved
they had not got involved
Past perfect
I had not got involved
you had not got involved
he/she/it had not got involved
we had not got involved
you had not got involved
they had not got involved
Simple future
I will not get involved
you will not get involved
he/she/it will not get involved
we will not get involved
you will not get involved
they will not get involved
Future perfect
I will not have got involved
you will not have got involved
he/she/it will not have got involved
we will not have got involved
you will not have got involved
they will not have got involved
Present continuous
I am not getting involved
you are not getting involved
he/she/it is not getting involved
we are not getting involved
you are not getting involved
they are not getting involved
Past simple continuous
I was not getting involved
you were not getting involved
he/she/it was not getting involved
we were not getting involved
you were not getting involved
they were not getting involved
Future continuous
I will not be getting involved
you will not be getting involved
he/she/it will not be getting involved
we will not be getting involved
you will not be getting involved
they will not be getting involved
Future perfect continuous
I will not have been getting involved
you will not have been getting involved
he/she/it will not have been getting involved
we will not have been getting involved
you will not have been getting involved
they will not have been getting involved
Present perfect continuous
I have not been getting involved
you have not been getting involved
he/she/it has not been getting involved
we have not been getting involved
you have not been getting involved
they have not been getting involved
Past perfect continuous
I had not been getting involved
you had not been getting involved
he/she/it had not been getting involved
we had not been getting involved
you had not been getting involved
they had not been getting involved
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do not get involved
That you do not get involved
That he/she/it does not get involved
That we do not get involved
That you do not get involved
That they do not get involved
Present perfect
That I have not got involved
That you have not got involved
That he/she/it have not got involved
That we have not got involved
That you have not got involved
That they have not got involved
Simple past
That I did not get involved
That you did not get involved
That he/she/it did not get involved
That we did not get involved
That you did not get involved
That they did not get involved
Past perfect
That I had not got involved
That you had not got involved
That he/she/it had not got involved
That we had not got involved
That you had not got involved
That they had not got involved
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not get involved
you would not get involved
we would not get involved
we would not get involved
you would not get involved
they would not get involved
Past
I would not have got
you would not have got
he/she/it would not have got
we would not have got
you would not have got
they would not have got
Present continous
I would not be getting involved
you would not be getting involved
we would not be getting involved
we would not be getting involved
you would not be getting involved
they would not be getting involved
Past continous
I would not have been getting
you would not have been getting
he/she/it would not have been getting
we would not have been getting
you would not have been getting
they would not have been getting
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
do not let me get involved
do not get involved
do not let him get involved
do not let us get involved
do not get involved
do not let them get involved
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to get
Past
not to have got
Present continous
not to be getting
Perfect continous
not to have been getting
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not getting
Past
not got
Perfect
not having got
Negative - GERUND
Present
not getting
Past
not having got
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I get involved?
do you get involved?
does she/he/it gets involved?
do we get involved?
do you get involved?
do they get involved?
Simple past
did I get involved?
did you get involved?
did she/he/it get involved?
did we get involved?
did you get involved?
did they get involved?
Simple past
did I get involved?
did you get involved?
did she/he/it get involved?
did we get involved?
did you get involved?
did they get involved?
Present perfect
have I got involved?
have you got involved?
has she/he/it got involved?
have we got involved?
have you got involved?
have they got involved?
Past perfect
had I got involved?
had you got involved?
had she/he/it got involved?
had we got involved?
had you got involved?
had they got involved?
Past perfect
had I got involved?
had you got involved?
had she/he/it got involved?
had we got involved?
had you got involved?
had they got involved?
Simple future
will I get involved?
will you get involved?
will she/he/it get involved?
will we get involved?
will you get involved?
will they get involved?
Future perfect
will I have got involved?
will you have got involved?
will she/he/it have got involved?
will we have got involved?
will you have got involved?
will they have got involved?
Present continuous
am I getting involved?
are you getting involved?
is she/he/it getting involved?
are we getting involved?
are you getting involved?
are they getting involved?
Past simple continuous
was I getting involved?
were you getting involved?
was she/he/it getting involved?
were we getting involved?
were you getting involved?
were they getting involved?
Future continuous
will I be getting involved?
will you be getting involved?
will she/he/it be getting involved?
will we be getting involved?
will you be getting involved?
will they be getting involved?
Future perfect continuous
will I have been getting involved?
will you have been getting involved?
will she/he/it have been getting involved?
will we have been getting involved?
will you have been getting involved?
will they have been getting involved?
Present perfect continuous
have I been getting involved?
have you been getting involved?
has she/he/it been getting involved?
have we been getting involved?
have you been getting involved?
have they been getting involved?
Past perfect continuous
had I been getting involved?
had you been getting involved?
had she/he/it been getting involved?
had we been getting involved?
had you been getting involved?
had they been getting involved?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I get involved?
That do you get involved?
That does she/he/it get involved?
That do we get involved?
That do you get involved?
That do they get involved?
Present perfect
That have I got involved?
That have you got involved?
That have she/he/it got involved?
That have we got involved?
That have you got involved?
That have they got involved?
Simple past
That did I get involved?
That did you get involved?
That did she/he/it get involved?
That did we get involved?
That did you get involved?
That did they get involved?
Past perfect
That had I got involved?
That had you got involved?
That had she/he/it got involved?
That had we got involved?
That had you got involved?
That had they got involved?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I get involved?
would you get involved?
would she/he/it get involved?
would we get involved?
would you get involved?
would they get involved?
Past
would I have got?
would you have got?
would she/he/it have got?
would we have got?
would you have got?
would they have got?
Present continous
would I be getting involved?
would you be getting involved?
would she/he/it be getting involved?
would we be getting involved?
would you be getting involved?
would they be getting involved?
Past continous
would I have been getting?
would you have been getting?
would she/he/it have been getting?
would we have been getting?
would you have been getting?
would they have been getting?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not get involved?
do you not get involved?
does she/he/it not gets involved?
do we not get involved?
do you not get involved?
do they not get involved?
Simple past
did I not get involved?
did you not get involved?
did she/he/it not get involved?
did we not get involved?
did you not get involved?
did they not get involved?
Simple past
did I not get involved?
did you not get involved?
did she/he/it not get involved?
did we not get involved?
did you not get involved?
did they not get involved?
Present perfect
have I not got involved?
have you not got involved?
has she/he/it not got involved?
have we not got involved?
have you not got involved?
have they not got involved?
Past perfect
had I not got involved?
had you not got involved?
had she/he/it not got involved?
had we not got involved?
had you not got involved?
had they not got involved?
Past perfect
had I not got involved?
had you not got involved?
had she/he/it not got involved?
had we not got involved?
had you not got involved?
had they not got involved?
Simple future
will I not get involved?
will you not get involved?
will she/he/it not get involved?
will we not get involved?
will you not get involved?
will they not get involved?
Future perfect
will I not have got involved?
will you not have got involved?
will she/he/it not have got involved?
will we not have got involved?
will you not have got involved?
will they not have got involved?
Present continuous
am I not getting involved?
are you not getting involved?
is she/he/it not getting involved?
are we not getting involved?
are you not getting involved?
are they not getting involved?
Past simple continuous
was I not getting involved?
were you not getting involved?
was she/he/it not getting involved?
were we not getting involved?
were you not getting involved?
were they not getting involved?
Future continuous
will I not be getting involved?
will you not be getting involved?
will she/he/it not be getting involved?
will we not be getting involved?
will you not be getting involved?
will they not be getting involved?
Future perfect continuous
will I not have been getting involved?
will you not have been getting involved?
will she/he/it not have been getting involved?
will we not have been getting involved?
will you not have been getting involved?
will they not have been getting involved?
Present perfect continuous
have I not been getting involved?
have you not been getting involved?
has she/he/it not been getting involved?
have we not been getting involved?
have you not been getting involved?
have they not been getting involved?
Past perfect continuous
had I not been getting involved?
had you not been getting involved?
had she/he/it not been getting involved?
had we not been getting involved?
had you not been getting involved?
had they not been getting involved?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not get involved?
That do you not get involved?
That does she/he/it not get involved?
That do we not get involved?
That do you not get involved?
That do they not get involved?
Present perfect
That have I not got involved?
That have you not got involved?
That have she/he/it not got involved?
That have we not got involved?
That have you not got involved?
That have they not got involved?
Simple past
That did I not get involved?
That did you not get involved?
That did she/he/it not get involved?
That did we not get involved?
That did you not get involved?
That did they not get involved?
Past perfect
That had I not got involved?
That had you not got involved?
That had she/he/it not got involved?
That had we not got involved?
That had you not got involved?
That had they not got involved?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not get involved?
would you not get involved?
would she/he/it not get involved?
would we not get involved?
would you not get involved?
would they not get involved?
Past
would I not have got?
would you not have got?
would she/he/it not have got?
would we not have got?
would you not have got?
would they not have got?
Present continous
would I not be getting involved?
would you not be getting involved?
would she/he/it not be getting involved?
would we not be getting involved?
would you not be getting involved?
would they not be getting involved?
Past continous
would I not have been getting?
would you not have been getting?
would she/he/it not have been getting?
would we not have been getting?
would you not have been getting?
would they not have been getting?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present