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sinonimi di think
Cerca  frasi:
Italiano
Vocabolario e frasi
architettare
= verbo trans. ideare il progetto di un edificio concepire , ordire , macchinare
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ideabile
= che si può ideare , pensabile .
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progettare
= verbo trans . pensare , ideare qualcosa e studiare il modo di realizzarla<>
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Inglese
Vocabolario e frasi
"(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.<>
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Only think what an establishment it wouldbe for one of them.<>
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Long and her neices must stand their chance; and, therefore, asshe will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I willtake it on myself.<>
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Everybody said how wellshe looked; and Mr. Bingley thought her quite beautiful, and danced withher twice! Only think of that, my dear; he actually danced with hertwice! and she was the only creature in the room that he asked a secondtime.<>
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They were rather handsome, had been educated in one of thefirst private seminaries in town, had a fortune of twenty thousandpounds, were in the habit of spending more than they ought, and ofassociating with people of rank, and were therefore in every respectentitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others.<>
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Miss Bennet was thereforeestablished as a sweet girl, and their brother felt authorized by suchcommendation to think of her as he chose.<>
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It had given him adisgust to his business, and to his residence in a small market town;and, in quitting them both, he had removed with his family to a houseabout a mile from Meryton, denominated from that period Lucas Lodge,where he could think with pleasure of his own importance, and,unshackled by business, occupy himself solely in being civil to allthe world.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Perhaps you mean what I overheard between him and Mr. Robinson; did notI mention it to you? Mr. Robinson's asking him how he liked our Merytonassemblies, and whether he did not think there were a great manypretty women in the room, and which he thought the prettiest? and hisanswering immediately to the last question: 'Oh! the eldest Miss Bennet,beyond a doubt; there cannot be two opinions on that point.<>
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One cannot wonder that sovery fine a young man, with family, fortune, everything in his favour,should think highly of himself.<>
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Pride relates more to our opinion ofourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Well," said Charlotte, "I wish Jane success with all my heart; andif she were married to him to-morrow, I should think she had as good achance of happiness as if she were to be studying his character for atwelvemonth.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Do you not think it would be a proper compliment to the place?""It is a compliment which I never pay to any place if I can avoid it.<>
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Bennet, "that you should be soready to think your own children silly.<>
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If I wished to think slightinglyof anybody's children, it should not be of my own, however.<>
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Ihad hoped that our sentiments coincided in every particular, but I mustso far differ from you as to think our two youngest daughters uncommonlyfoolish.<>
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When they get to our age, I dare say they willnot think about officers any more than we do.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "How can you be so silly," cried her mother, "as to think of such athing, in all this dirt! You will not be fit to be seen when you getthere.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "You observed it, Mr. Darcy, I am sure," said Miss Bingley; "and I aminclined to think that you would not wish to see your sister make suchan exhibition.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I think I have heard you say that their uncle is an attorney inMeryton.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Upon my word, Caroline, I should think it more possible to getPemberley by purchase than by imitation.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Is Miss Darcy much grown since the spring?" said Miss Bingley; "willshe be as tall as I am?""I think she will.<>
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Mr. Jones says we must not think of moving her.<>
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You will not think of quitting itin a hurry, I hope, though you have but a short lease.<>
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But thatgentleman," looking at Darcy, "seemed to think the country was nothingat all.<>
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She longed tospeak, but could think of nothing to say; and after a short silence Mrs.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "How many letters you must have occasion to write in the course of ayear! Letters of business, too! How odious I should think them!""It is fortunate, then, that they fall to my lot instead of yours.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Tell your sister I am delighted to hear of her improvement on the harp;and pray let her know that I am quite in raptures with her beautifullittle design for a table, and I think it infinitely superior to MissGrantley's.<>
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But I amafraid you are giving it a turn which that gentleman did by no meansintend; for he would certainly think better of me, if under such acircumstance I were to give a flat denial, and ride off as fast as Icould.<>
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But in general and ordinary cases between friend and friend,where one of them is desired by the other to change a resolution of novery great moment, should you think ill of that person for complyingwith the desire, without waiting to be argued into it?""Will it not be advisable, before we proceed on this subject, toarrange with rather more precision the degree of importance which is toappertain to this request, as well as the degree of intimacy subsistingbetween the parties?""By all means," cried Bingley; "let us hear all the particulars, notforgetting their comparative height and size; for that will have moreweight in the argument, Miss Bennet, than you may be aware of.<>
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I do think it is the hardest thingin the world, that your estate should be entailed away from your ownchildren; and I am sure, if I had been you, I should have tried long agoto do something or other about it.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "No, that I am sure I shall not; and I think it is very impertinent ofhim to write to you at all, and very hypocritical.<>
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--Could he be a sensible man, sir?""No, my dear, I think not.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I think you said she was a widow, sir? Has she any family?""She has only one daughter, the heiress of Rosings, and of veryextensive property.<>
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"I havespent four days in the same house with him, and I think him verydisagreeable.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth was again deep in thought, and after a time exclaimed, "Totreat in such a manner the godson, the friend, the favourite of hisfather!" She could have added, "A young man, too, like you, whose verycountenance may vouch for your being amiable"--but she contented herselfwith, "and one, too, who had probably been his companion from childhood,connected together, as I think you said, in the closest manner!""We were born in the same parish, within the same park; the greatestpart of our youth was passed together; inmates of the same house,sharing the same amusements, objects of the same parental care.<>
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Thepossibility of his having endured such unkindness, was enough tointerest all her tender feelings; and nothing remained therefore to bedone, but to think well of them both, to defend the conduct of each,and throw into the account of accident or mistake whatever could not beotherwise explained.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Very true, indeed; and now, my dear Jane, what have you got to say onbehalf of the interested people who have probably been concerned in thebusiness? Do clear them too, or we shall be obliged to think ill ofsomebody.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) But Jane could think with certainty on only one point--that Mr. Bingley,if he had been imposed on, would have much to suffer when the affairbecame public.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth's spirits were so high on this occasion, that though she didnot often speak unnecessarily to Mr. Collins, she could not help askinghim whether he intended to accept Mr. Bingley's invitation, and ifhe did, whether he would think it proper to join in the evening'samusement; and she was rather surprised to find that he entertained noscruple whatever on that head, and was very far from dreading a rebukeeither from the Archbishop, or Lady Catherine de Bourgh, by venturing todance.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I do not think we were speaking at all.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "What think you of books?" said he, smiling.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least beno want of subject.<>
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But perhaps you havebeen too pleasantly engaged to think of any third person; in which caseyou may be sure of my pardon.<>
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Mr.Bingley's defense of his friend was a very able one, I dare say; butsince he is unacquainted with several parts of the story, and has learntthe rest from that friend himself, I shall venture to still think ofboth gentlemen as I did before.<>
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His being such a charming young man, and so rich, and living butthree miles from them, were the first points of self-gratulation; andthen it was such a comfort to think how fond the two sisters were ofJane, and to be certain that they must desire the connection as much asshe could do.<>
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And I do not think it of light importancethat he should have attentive and conciliatory manners towards everybody,especially towards those to whom he owes his preferment.<>
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I cannot acquithim of that duty; nor could I think well of the man who should omit anoccasion of testifying his respect towards anybody connected with thefamily.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) To Elizabeth it appeared that, had her family made an agreement toexpose themselves as much as they could during the evening, it wouldhave been impossible for them to play their parts with more spirit orfiner success; and happy did she think it for Bingley and her sisterthat some of the exhibition had escaped his notice, and that hisfeelings were not of a sort to be much distressed by the folly which hemust have witnessed.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) The idea of Mr. Collins, with all his solemn composure, being run awaywith by his feelings, made Elizabeth so near laughing, that she couldnot use the short pause he allowed in any attempt to stop him further,and he continued:"My reasons for marrying are, first, that I think it a right thing forevery clergyman in easy circumstances (like myself) to set the exampleof matrimony in his parish; secondly, that I am convinced that it willadd very greatly to my happiness; and thirdly--which perhaps I oughtto have mentioned earlier, that it is the particular advice andrecommendation of the very noble lady whom I have the honour of callingpatroness.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Were it certain that Lady Catherine would think so," said Mr. Collinsvery gravely--"but I cannot imagine that her ladyship would at alldisapprove of you.<>
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She was met in the vestibule by Lydia, who, flying toher, cried in a half whisper, "I am glad you are come, for there is suchfun here! What do you think has happened this morning? Mr. Collins hasmade an offer to Lizzy, and she will not have him.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Why will you think so? It must be his own doing.<>
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With all these circumstances tofavour an attachment, and nothing to prevent it, am I wrong, my dearestJane, in indulging the hope of an event which will secure the happinessof so many?""What do you think of this sentence, my dear Lizzy?" said Jane as shefinished it.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I did not think you would; and that being the case, I cannot consideryour situation with much compassion.<>
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Risk anything rather than herdispleasure; and if you find it likely to be raised by your coming to usagain, which I should think exceedingly probable, stay quietly at home,and be satisfied that we shall take no offence.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) The possibility of Mr. Collins's fancying himself in love with herfriend had once occurred to Elizabeth within the last day or two; butthat Charlotte could encourage him seemed almost as far frompossibility as she could encourage him herself, and her astonishment wasconsequently so great as to overcome at first the bounds of decorum, andshe could not help crying out:"Engaged to Mr. Collins! My dear Charlotte--impossible!"The steady countenance which Miss Lucas had commanded in telling herstory, gave way to a momentary confusion here on receiving so direct areproach; though, as it was no more than she expected, she soon regainedher composure, and calmly replied:"Why should you be surprised, my dear Eliza? Do you think it incrediblethat Mr. Collins should be able to procure any woman's good opinion,because he was not so happy as to succeed with you?"But Elizabeth had now recollected herself, and making a strong effortfor it, was able to assure with tolerable firmness that the prospect oftheir relationship was highly grateful to her, and that she wished herall imaginable happiness.<>
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But when you have had time to think it over, I hope you will besatisfied with what I have done.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Mr. Bennet's emotions were much more tranquil on the occasion, and suchas he did experience he pronounced to be of a most agreeable sort; forit gratified him, he said, to discover that Charlotte Lucas, whom he hadbeen used to think tolerably sensible, was as foolish as his wife, andmore foolish than his daughter!Jane confessed herself a little surprised at the match; but she saidless of her astonishment than of her earnest desire for their happiness;nor could Elizabeth persuade her to consider it as improbable.<>
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But as no such delicacy restrained her mother,an hour seldom passed in which she did not talk of Bingley, express herimpatience for his arrival, or even require Jane to confess that if hedid not come back she would think herself very ill used.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Indeed, Mr. Bennet," said she, "it is very hard to think that CharlotteLucas should ever be mistress of this house, that I should be forced tomake way for her, and live to see her take her place in it!""My dear, do not give way to such gloomy thoughts.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I cannot bear to think that they should have all this estate.<>
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That he was really fond of Jane, she doubted no more than shehad ever done; and much as she had always been disposed to like him, shecould not think without anger, hardly without contempt, on that easinessof temper, that want of proper resolution, which now made him the slaveof his designing friends, and led him to sacrifice of his own happinessto the caprice of their inclination.<>
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Shecould think of nothing else; and yet whether Bingley's regard had reallydied away, or were suppressed by his friends' interference; whetherhe had been aware of Jane's attachment, or whether it had escaped hisobservation; whatever were the case, though her opinion of him must bematerially affected by the difference, her sister's situation remainedthe same, her peace equally wounded.<>
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You wish to think all theworld respectable, and are hurt if I speak ill of anybody.<>
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I only wantto think you perfect, and you set yourself against it.<>
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There are few peoplewhom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "To oblige you, I would try to believe almost anything, but no one elsecould be benefited by such a belief as this; for were I persuaded thatCharlotte had any regard for him, I should only think worse of herunderstanding than I now do of her heart.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I must think your language too strong in speaking of both," repliedJane; "and I hope you will be convinced of it by seeing them happytogether.<>
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But if I go on, I shall displease you by saying whatI think of persons you esteem.<>
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It is something to think of, and it gives her a sort of distinctionamong her companions.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "True," said Mr. Bennet, "but it is a comfort to think that whatever ofthat kind may befall you, you have an affectionate mother who will makethe most of it.<>
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It makes me very nervous and poorly, to be thwartedso in my own family, and to have neighbours who think of themselvesbefore anybody else.<>
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It does not oftenhappen that the interference of friends will persuade a young man ofindependent fortune to think no more of a girl whom he was violently inlove with only a few days before.<>
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But do you think shewould be prevailed upon to go back with us? Change of scene might beof service--and perhaps a little relief from home may be as useful asanything.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "And that is quite impossible; for he is now in the custody of hisfriend, and Mr. Darcy would no more suffer him to call on Jane in sucha part of London! My dear aunt, how could you think of it? Mr. Darcy mayperhaps have heard of such a place as Gracechurch Street, but hewould hardly think a month's ablution enough to cleanse him from itsimpurities, were he once to enter it; and depend upon it, Mr. Bingleynever stirs without him.<>
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I have nothing to say againsthim; he is a most interesting young man; and if he had the fortune heought to have, I should think you could not do better.<>
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But really, and upon myhonour, I will try to do what I think to be the wisest; and now I hopeyou are satisfied.<>
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"I did not think Caroline in spirits," were her words, "but she was veryglad to see me, and reproached me for giving her no notice of my comingto London.<>
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But, my dear sister,though the event has proved you right, do not think me obstinate if Istill assert that, considering what her behaviour was, my confidence wasas natural as your suspicion.<>
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But I will endeavour to banish every painful thought,and think only of what will make me happy--your affection, and theinvariable kindness of my dear uncle and aunt.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But my dear Elizabeth," she added, "what sort of girl is Miss King? Ishould be sorry to think our friend mercenary.<>
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I should be sorry, you know,to think ill of a young man who has lived so long in Derbyshire.<>
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Lady Catherine will not think the worse of youfor being simply dressed.<>
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But really, ma'am, I think it would be very hard uponyounger sisters, that they should not have their share of society andamusement, because the elder may not have the means or inclination tomarry early.<>
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And to be kept back on such a motive! I think it wouldnot be very likely to promote sisterly affection or delicacy of mind.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Very few days passed in which Mr. Collins did not walk to Rosings, andnot many in which his wife did not think it necessary to go likewise;and till Elizabeth recollected that there might be other family livingsto be disposed of, she could not understand the sacrifice of so manyhours.<>
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The first time of my ever seeing him in Hertfordshire, you must know,was at a ball--and at this ball, what do you think he did? He dancedonly four dances, though gentlemen were scarce; and, to my certainknowledge, more than one young lady was sitting down in want of apartner.<>
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It was absolutelynecessary, therefore, to think of something, and in this emergencerecollecting when she had seen him last in Hertfordshire, andfeeling curious to know what he would say on the subject of their hastydeparture, she observed:"How very suddenly you all quitted Netherfield last November, Mr. Darcy!It must have been a most agreeable surprise to Mr. Bingley to see youall after him so soon; for, if I recollect right, he went but the daybefore.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) She found that she was to receive no other answer, and, after a shortpause added:"I think I have understood that Mr. Bingley has not much idea of everreturning to Netherfield again?""I have never heard him say so; but it is probable that he may spendvery little of his time there in the future.<>
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Collins did not think it right to press the subject, from the danger ofraising expectations which might only end in disappointment; for in heropinion it admitted not of a doubt, that all her friend's dislike wouldvanish, if she could suppose him to be in her power.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Unless where they like women of fortune, which I think they very oftendo.<>
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I think I have heard you say that you know them.<>
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From something that he told me inour journey hither, I have reason to think Bingley very much indebted tohim.<>
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There, shut into her own room,as soon as their visitor left them, she could think without interruptionof all that she had heard.<>
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It was some consolationto think that his visit to Rosings was to end on the day after thenext--and, a still greater, that in less than a fortnight she shouldherself be with Jane again, and enabled to contribute to the recovery ofher spirits, by all that affection could do.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) She could not think of Darcy's leaving Kent without remembering thathis cousin was to go with him; but Colonel Fitzwilliam had made it clearthat he had no intentions at all, and agreeable as he was, she did notmean to be unhappy about him.<>
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Had not my feelings decided againstyou--had they been indifferent, or had they even been favourable, do youthink that any consideration would tempt me to accept the man who hasbeen the means of ruining, perhaps for ever, the happiness of a mostbeloved sister?"As she pronounced these words, Mr. Darcy changed colour; but the emotionwas short, and he listened without attempting to interrupt her while shecontinued:"I have every reason in the world to think ill of you.<>
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She could not yet recover from thesurprise of what had happened; it was impossible to think of anythingelse; and, totally indisposed for employment, she resolved, soon afterbreakfast, to indulge herself in air and exercise.<>
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As for myself, it ismany, many years since I first began to think of him in a very differentmanner.<>
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His own father did not longsurvive mine, and within half a year from these events, Mr. Wickhamwrote to inform me that, having finally resolved against taking orders,he hoped I should not think it unreasonable for him to expect some moreimmediate pecuniary advantage, in lieu of the preferment, by which hecould not be benefited.<>
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Of neither Darcy nor Wickhamcould she think without feeling she had been blind, partial, prejudiced,absurd.<>
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Colonel Fitzwilliam was nolonger an object; she could think only of her letter.<>
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We have certainly done our best; and most fortunatelyhaving it in our power to introduce you to very superior society, and,from our connection with Rosings, the frequent means of varying thehumble home scene, I think we may flatter ourselves that your Hunsfordvisit cannot have been entirely irksome.<>
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In truth I must acknowledgethat, with all the disadvantages of this humble parsonage, I shouldnot think anyone abiding in it an object of compassion, while they aresharers of our intimacy at Rosings.<>
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Mamma would like togo too of all things! Only think what a miserable summer else we shallhave!""Yes," thought Elizabeth, "that would be a delightful scheme indeed,and completely do for us at once.<>
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I will answer for it, he never caredthree straws about her--who could about such a nasty little freckledthing?"Elizabeth was shocked to think that, however incapable of suchcoarseness of expression herself, the coarseness of the sentimentwas little other than her own breast had harboured and fancied liberal!As soon as all had ate, and the elder ones paid, the carriage wasordered; and after some contrivance, the whole party, with all theirboxes, work-bags, and parcels, and the unwelcome addition of Kitty's andLydia's purchases, were seated in it.<>
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She says Lizzy had better have taken Mr.Collins; but I do not think there would have been any fun in it.<>
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Forster and me are such friends!) and soshe asked the two Harringtons to come, but Harriet was ill, and so Penwas forced to come by herself; and then, what do you think we did? Wedressed up Chamberlayne in woman's clothes on purpose to pass for alady, only think what fun! Not a soul knew of it, but Colonel and Mrs.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Oh! Mary," said she, "I wish you had gone with us, for we had such fun!As we went along, Kitty and I drew up the blinds, and pretended therewas nobody in the coach; and I should have gone so all the way, if Kittyhad not been sick; and when we got to the George, I do think we behavedvery handsomely, for we treated the other three with the nicest coldluncheon in the world, and if you would have gone, we would have treatedyou too.<>
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But I think Mr. Darcy improves upon acquaintance.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "And do not you think him a very handsome gentleman, ma'am?""Yes, very handsome.<>
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Elizabeth could not help saying, "It isvery much to his credit, I am sure, that you should think so.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "He is the best landlord, and the best master," said she, "that everlived; not like the wild young men nowadays, who think of nothing butthemselves.<>
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She immediately feltthat whatever desire Miss Darcy might have of being acquainted with hermust be the work of her brother, and, without looking farther, it wassatisfactory; it was gratifying to know that his resentment had not madehim think really ill of her.<>
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Gardiner was surprised and concerned; but as they were nowapproaching the scene of her former pleasures, every idea gave way tothe charm of recollection; and she was too much engaged in pointing outto her husband all the interesting spots in its environs to think ofanything else.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) The occurrences of the day were too full of interest to leave Elizabethmuch attention for any of these new friends; and she could do nothingbut think, and think with wonder, of Mr. Darcy's civility, and, aboveall, of his wishing her to be acquainted with his sister.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Of Mr. Darcy it was now a matter of anxiety to think well; and, as faras their acquaintance reached, there was no fault to find.<>
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My father and mother believe theworst, but I cannot think so ill of him.<>
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Could he expect that her friendswould not step forward? Could he expect to be noticed again by theregiment, after such an affront to Colonel Forster? His temptation isnot adequate to the risk!""Do you really think so?" cried Elizabeth, brightening up for a moment.<>
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I cannot think so very ill ofWickham.<>
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Lydia hasno brothers to step forward; and he might imagine, from my father'sbehaviour, from his indolence and the little attention he has everseemed to give to what was going forward in his family, that he woulddo as little, and think as little about it, as any father could do, insuch a matter.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But can you think that Lydia is so lost to everything but love of himas to consent to live with him on any terms other than marriage?""It does seem, and it is most shocking indeed," replied Elizabeth, withtears in her eyes, "that a sister's sense of decency and virtue in sucha point should admit of doubt.<>
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But she is very young; she has neverbeen taught to think on serious subjects; and for the last half-year,nay, for a twelvemonth--she has been given up to nothing but amusementand vanity.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But you see that Jane," said her aunt, "does not think so very ill ofWickham as to believe him capable of the attempt.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Of whom does Jane ever think ill? And who is there, whatever might betheir former conduct, that she would think capable of such an attempt,till it were proved against them? But Jane knows, as well as I do, whatWickham really is.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "And did Colonel Forster appear to think well of Wickham himself? Doeshe know his real character?""I must confess that he did not speak so well of Wickham as he formerlydid.<>
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I am going to Gretna Green, and if you cannot guess with who,I shall think you a simpleton, for there is but one man in the world Ilove, and he is an angel.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Mary and Kitty have been very kind, and would have shared in everyfatigue, I am sure; but I did not think it right for either of them.<>
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I should be sorry to think so ill of him,in the very beginning of our relationship.<>
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Elizabeth received hercongratulations amongst the rest, and then, sick of this folly, tookrefuge in her own room, that she might think with freedom.<>
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And I think you will agree with me, inconsidering the removal from that corps as highly advisable, both onhis account and my niece's.<>
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But Jane and Elizabeth,who agreed in wishing, for the sake of their sister's feelings andconsequence, that she should be noticed on her marriage by her parents,urged him so earnestly yet so rationally and so mildly, to receive herand her husband at Longbourn, as soon as they were married, that he wasprevailed on to think as they thought, and act as they wished.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Only think of its being three months," she cried, "since I went away;it seems but a fortnight I declare; and yet there have been thingsenough happened in the time.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Well, mamma," said she, when they were all returned to the breakfastroom, "and what do you think of my husband? Is not he a charming man? Iam sure my sisters must all envy me.<>
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Are not youcurious to hear how it was managed?""No really," replied Elizabeth; "I think there cannot be too little saidon the subject.<>
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Pray write instantly, and let me understand it--unless it is,for very cogent reasons, to remain in the secrecy which Lydia seemsto think necessary; and then I must endeavour to be satisfied withignorance.<>
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Don't think me angry,however, for I only mean to let you know that I had not imagined suchinquiries to be necessary on your side.<>
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She was ashamed to think how much.<>
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Bennet had been strongly inclined to ask them to stay and dinethere that day; but, though she always kept a very good table, she didnot think anything less than two courses could be good enough for a manon whom she had such anxious designs, or satisfy the appetite and prideof one who had ten thousand a year.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "My dear Lizzy, you cannot think me so weak, as to be in danger now?""I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love withyou as ever.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) She could think of nothing more to say; but if he wished to conversewith her, he might have better success.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Well girls," said she, as soon as they were left to themselves, "Whatsay you to the day? I think every thing has passed off uncommonly well,I assure you.<>
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Andwhat do you think she said besides? 'Ah! Mrs.<>
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I do think Mrs.<>
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I think she will be pleased with the hermitage.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "How could I ever think her like her nephew?" said she, as she looked inher face.<>
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You have widely mistaken my character, ifyou think I can be worked on by such persuasions as these.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Chapter 57The discomposure of spirits which this extraordinary visit threwElizabeth into, could not be easily overcome; nor could she, for manyhours, learn to think of it less than incessantly.<>
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Young ladies have great penetration in such mattersas these; but I think I may defy even your sagacity, to discover thename of your admirer.<>
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"Mr. Darcy, you see, is the man! Now, Lizzy, I think I havesurprised you.<>
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I did not think Mrs.<>
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I cannot think of it without abhorrence.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "The letter shall certainly be burnt, if you believe it essential to thepreservation of my regard; but, though we have both reason to think myopinions not entirely unalterable, they are not, I hope, quite so easilychanged as that implies.<>
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But think no more of the letter.<>
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Unfortunately an only son (for many years an only child), I was spoiltby my parents, who, though good themselves (my father, particularly, allthat was benevolent and amiable), allowed, encouraged, almost taughtme to be selfish and overbearing; to care for none beyond my own familycircle; to think meanly of all the rest of the world; to wish at leastto think meanly of their sense and worth compared with my own.<>
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What will you think of my vanity? I believed you to bewishing, expecting my addresses.<>
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Are you quite sure that you feel what you oughtto do?""Oh, yes! You will only think I feel more than I ought to do, when Itell you all.<>
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But let me advise you to think better of it.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "My dearest child," she cried, "I can think of nothing else! Tenthousand a year, and very likely more! 'Tis as good as a Lord! And aspecial licence.<>
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"Wickham, perhaps,is my favourite; but I think I shall like your husband quite as wellas Jane's.<>
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There--I have saved you the trouble of accounting forit; and really, all things considered, I begin to think it perfectlyreasonable.<>
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At such a moment, the arrival of her friendwas a sincere pleasure to Elizabeth, though in the course of theirmeetings she must sometimes think the pleasure dearly bought, when shesaw Mr. Darcy exposed to all the parading and obsequious civility ofher husband.<>
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It is a great comfort to have you sorich, and when you have nothing else to do, I hope you will think of us.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Present! think I was; fired a musket--fired with an idea--rushed intowine shop--wrote it down--back again--whiz, bang--another idea--wineshop again--pen and ink--back again--cut and slash--noble time, Sir.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think we may,' replied Mr. Snodgrass; who would have assented toany proposition, because he knew nothing about the matter.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think we may adjourn,' said Lieutenant Tappleton.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think we shall leave here the day after to-morrow,' was the reply.<>
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His bloatedbody and shrunken legs--their deformity enhanced a hundredfold by thefantastic dress--the glassy eyes, contrasting fearfully with thethick white paint with which the face was besmeared; thegrotesquely-ornamented head, trembling with paralysis, and the longskinny hands, rubbed with white chalk--all gave him a hideous andunnatural appearance, of which no description could convey an adequateidea, and which, to this day, I shudder to think of.<>
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I think Igave that person a very pressing invitation last night, which he thoughtproper to decline.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I--I--really think they are,' urged Mr. Snodgrass, somewhat alarmed.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Do you think my dear nieces pretty?' whispered their affectionate auntto Mr. Tupman.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Oh, you naughty man--but really, if their complexions were alittle better, don't you think they would be nice-looking girls--bycandlelight?Yes; I think they would,' said Mr. Tupman, with an air of indifference.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You mean,' said the amiable aunt, sinking her voice still lower--'youmean, that you don't think Isabella's stooping is as bad as Emily'sboldness.<>
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Well, she is bold! You cannot think how wretched it makes mesometimes--I'm sure I cry about it for hours together--my dear brotheris SO good, and so unsuspicious, that he never sees it; if he did, I'mquite certain it would break his heart.<>
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I wish I could think it was onlymanner--I hope it may be--' (Here the affectionate relative heaved adeep sigh, and shook her head despondingly).<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I--I--really believe,' whispered Mr. Winkle, as his friends gatheredround him, 'that they think we have come by this horse in some dishonestmanner.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Hollo, you fellow,' said the angry Mr. Pickwick,'do you think we stolethe horse?I'm sure ye did,' replied the red-headed man, with a grin whichagitated his countenance from one auricular organ to the other.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, I think it is,' said Mr. Wardle.<>
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Played it! Think I have--thousands of times--nothere--West Indies--exciting thing--hot work--very.<>
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--Isay, Wardle, we're all right, ain't we?I should think so,' replied the jolly host.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'What do you think I see in this very arbour last night?' inquired theboy.<>
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Why, Idon't think I've heard his voice for two hours at least.<>
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"--"I think you wants one, Sir," saysthe touter.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I rather think it can be done,' said the bustling little man.<>
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However, whether it be the genuine production of a maniac, orfounded upon the ravings of some unhappy being (which I think moreprobable), read it, and judge for yourself.<>
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I think so too,' said Mr. Winkle.<>
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I could have screamed with ecstasy when I dined alonewith some fine roaring fellow, to think how pale he would have turned,and how fast he would have run, if he had known that the dear friend whosat close to him, sharpening a bright, glittering knife, was a madmanwith all the power, and half the will, to plunge it in his heart.<>
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Ha! ha! I think I see their frightened looks now, and feel theease with which I flung them from me, and dashed my clenched fist intotheir white faces, and then flew like the wind, and left them screamingand shouting far behind.<>
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The strength of a giant comes upon me whenI think of it.<>
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I could snap it like a twig, only there are long galleries herewith many doors--I don't think I could find my way along them; and evenif I could, I know there are iron gates below which they keep locked andbarred.<>
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Do you think it a much greater expenseto keep two people, than to keep one?La, Mr. Pickwick,' said Mrs.<>
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Bardell) I think possesses thesequalities; and has, moreover, a considerable knowledge of the world, anda great deal of sharpness, Mrs.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You'll think it very strange now,' said the amiable Mr. Pickwick, witha good-humoured glance at his companion, 'that I never consulted youabout this matter, and never even mentioned it, till I sent your littleboy out this morning--eh?'Mrs.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I should think so,' replied Sam, with a patronising wink.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I have an idea upon this subject,' said Mr. Pott, 'which I think may bevery successfully adopted.<>
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After repeated pressings on the part of Mr. Pott, and repeatedprotestations on that of Mr. Pickwick that he could not think ofincommoding or troubling his amiable wife, it was decided that it wasthe only feasible arrangement that could be made.<>
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I'll read you,' added the editor, turning to Mr.Pickwick--'I'll just read you a few of the leaders I wrote at that timeupon the Buff job of appointing a new tollman to the turnpike here; Irather think they'll amuse you.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Why,' replied Sam very slowly, 'I rather think one old gen'l'm'n wasmissin'; I know his hat was found, but I ain't quite certain whetherhis head was in it or not.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Why, I am afraid it wouldn't,' replied the agent; 'if it were done byyourself, my dear Sir, I think it would make you very popular.<>
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What do you think of that, you dog, eh!" The oldgentleman was proceeding to recount some other exploits of his youth,when he was seized with such a violent fit of creaking that he wasunable to proceed.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'The widow began to think it was high time to cry, so she took out herhandkerchief, and inquired whether Tom wished to insult her, whetherhe thought it like a gentleman to take away the character of anothergentleman behind his back, why, if he had got anything to say, he didn'tsay it to the man, like a man, instead of terrifying a poor weak womanin that way; and so forth.<>
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I don't think I have,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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I think you are right, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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His feelin's is all wery well, Sir,' replied Mr. Weller; 'and asthey're so wery fine, and it's a pity he should lose 'em, I think he'dbetter keep 'em in his own buzzum, than let 'em ewaporate in hot water,'specially as they do no good.<>
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I think it might be very easily done.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I never see such a feller,' said Sam, 'Blessed if I don't think he'sgot a main in his head as is always turned on.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I have not hurt MYSELF, Sam, certainly,' replied Mr. Pickwick, from theother side of the wall, 'but I rather think that YOU have hurt me.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'It's my opinion, Miss Tomkins,' said the writing and cipheringgoverness, 'that his manservant keeps him, I think he's a madman, MissTomkins, and the other's his keeper.<>
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I think you are very right, Miss Gwynn,' responded Miss Tomkins.<>
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I don't think he'll escape us quite so easily the next time, Sam!' saidMr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I don't think he will, Sir.<>
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"'I am sorry to record it of old Lobbs, but I think he would have struckthe cousin, if his pretty daughter, with her bright eyes swimming intears, had not clung to his arm.<>
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I didn't think he'd ha' done it, though--Ididn't think he'd ha' done it!' Moralising in this strain, Mr. SamuelWeller bent his steps towards the booking-office.<>
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I think you had better, sir,' said the long gamekeeper, 'or you'requite as likely to lodge the charge in yourself as in anything else.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I beg your pardon, sir--but I think there have been trespassers hereto-day.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think I'll wait,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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Pray, go on, sir--disgraceful and rascally proceedings, I think yousaid?I did,' said Mr. Pickwick, thoroughly roused.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think it is, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, what do you think of what your father says, Sam?' inquired Mr.Pickwick, with a smile.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Think, Sir!' replied Mr. Weller; 'why, I think he's the wictim o'connubiality, as Blue Beard's domestic chaplain said, vith a tear ofpity, ven he buried him.<>
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What fine places of slow torture they are! Think of the needyman who has spent his all, beggared himself, and pinched his friends, toenter the profession, which is destined never to yield him a morselof bread.<>
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Pooh,pooh! there's romance enough at home without going half a mile for it;only people never think of it.<>
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Nonsense; you think them strange,because you know nothing about it.<>
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Fromthe appearance of that press, I should be disposed to say that it isnot wholly free from bugs; and I really think you might find much morecomfortable quarters: to say nothing of the climate of London, whichis extremely disagreeable.<>
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What think you of them now! Seethere, see there!"'As the stranger spoke, he pointed to the sea.<>
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Ishall not think it dear, if you gain my object.<>
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She's got hold o' someinwention for grown-up people being born again, Sammy--the new birth,I think they calls it.<>
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Wouldn't I put her out to nurse!What do you think them women does t'other day,' continued Mr. Weller,after a short pause, during which he had significantly struck the sideof his nose with his forefinger some half-dozen times.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Yes, I think it is,' resumed Mr. Magnus.<>
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Blessed if I don't think that ven a man's wery poor, he rushes out ofhis lodgings, and eats oysters in reg'lar desperation.<>
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Really,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'I must throw myself on your mercy, to tellme or not, as you may think best; for I should never guess, if I were totry all night.<>
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I think an inn is agood sort of a place to propose to a single woman in, Mr. Pickwick.<>
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What do you think, Mr. Pickwick?I think it is very probable,' replied that gentleman.<>
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I think it'sfive-and-twenty, but I don't rightly know vether it ain't more.<>
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Too much!' echoed Sam, 'I think it is too much--rayther! Now, what haveyou got to say to me, eh?'Mr. Trotter made no reply; for the little pink pocket-handkerchief wasin full force.<>
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To think that my master should have suspected the conversationI had with yours, and so dragged me away in a post-chaise, and afterpersuading the sweet young lady to say she knew nothing of him, andbribing the school-mistress to do the same, deserted her for a betterspeculation! Oh! Mr. Weller, it makes me shudder.<>
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What do you think of this,Sir?Very effective indeed,' replied Mr. Pickwick, surveying the garments ofMr. Peter Magnus with a good-natured smile.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Yes, I think it'll do,' said Mr. Magnus.<>
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You think that may be taken for granted?' said Mr. Magnus; 'because, ifshe did not do that at the right place, it would be embarrassing.<>
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I think she would,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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I think I should kiss her, Mr. Magnus; and at thisparticular point, I am decidedly of opinion that if the lady were goingto take me at all, she would murmur into my ears a bashful acceptance.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think you had better, sir,' whispered Jinks to the magistrate.<>
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Therefore, I call upon you both, to--I think that's the course, Mr.Jinks?Certainly, Sir.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'What do you think of this request, Mr. Jinks?' murmured Mr. Nupkins.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Jinks, who didn't exactly know what to think of it, and was afraidhe might offend, smiled feebly, after a dubious fashion, and, screwingup the corners of his mouth, shook his head slowly from side to side.<>
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Wery sorry, Sir,' replied Mr. Weller; 'but when I think o' that 'ereJob, I can't help opening the walve a inch or two.<>
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Nupkins's tears continued to gush forth, with great velocity, untilshe had gained a little time to think the matter over; when she decided,in her own mind, that the best thing to do would be to ask Mr. Pickwickand his friends to remain until the captain's arrival, and then togive Mr. Pickwick the opportunity he sought.<>
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Only think o' my master havin' thepleasure o' meeting yourn upstairs, and me havin' the joy o' meetin'you down here.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think you ought to see him,' replied Mrs.<>
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I think two witnesses would be more lawful,' said Mrs.<>
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Cluppins, 'when I think ofsuch perjury.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I rayther think he is,' said the imperturbable Sam; 'and I hope thishere reverend gen'l'm'n 'll excuse me saying that I wish I was THEWeller as owns you, mother-in-law.<>
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Whatd'ye think it was all for?For another tea-drinkin', perhaps,' said Sam.<>
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I rayther think it isn't.<>
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Sam looked at the fat boy with greatastonishment, but without saying a word; and began to stow the luggagerapidly away in the cart, while the fat boy stood quietly by, and seemedto think it a very interesting sort of thing to see Mr. Weller workingby himself.<>
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I should rayther think so,' repliedSam.<>
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However, there was no time to think more about the matter, for thefiddles and harp began in real earnest.<>
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"What do you think of this, Gabriel?"said the goblin, kicking up his feet in the air on either side of thetombstone, and looking at the turned-up points with as much complacencyas if he had been contemplating the most fashionable pair of Wellingtonsin all Bond Street.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) '"It's--it's--very curious, Sir," replied the sexton, half dead withfright; "very curious, and very pretty, but I think I'll go back andfinish my work, Sir, if you please.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) '"Under favour, Sir," replied the horror-stricken sexton, "I don't thinkthey can, Sir; they don't know me, Sir; I don't think the gentlemen haveever seen me, Sir.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) '"What do you think of THAT?" said the goblin, turning his large facetowards Gabriel Grub.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I really think you had better,' said Allen.<>
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And there are theoffice lads in their first surtouts, who feel a befitting contempt forboys at day-schools, club as they go home at night, for saveloys andporter, and think there's nothing like 'life.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Tupman had witnessed this process in silent astonishment, whenJackson, turning sharply upon him, said--'I think I ain't mistaken when I say your name's Tupman, am I?'Mr. Tupman looked at Mr. Pickwick; but, perceiving no encouragement inthat gentleman's widely-opened eyes to deny his name, said--'Yes, my name is Tupman, Sir.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Now,' said Jackson, 'I'm afraid you'll think me rather troublesome, butI want somebody else, if it ain't inconvenient.<>
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"Well, ma'am," says he, "then I've just looked in to say that me andmy family ain't a-goin' to be choked for nothin'; and more than that,ma'am," he says, "you'll allow me to observe that as you don't use theprimest parts of the meat in the manafacter o' sassages, I'd think you'dfind beef come nearly as cheap as buttons.<>
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Will you leave a message forhim?When do you think he'll be back?' inquired the stranger.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You don't think it would be of any use my waiting for him?' said thestranger, looking wistfully into the office.<>
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It don't matter much, though; Idon't think many counsel could get a great deal out of HIM.<>
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I don't think they could,' said Mr. Pickwick, smiling, despite hisvexation, at the idea of Sam's appearance as a witness.<>
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I don't think I let these apartments to you, Sir.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think I hear it now,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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I am very much indebted to you for your friendship and good-nature,Hopkins,' said the wretched Mr. Bob Sawyer, 'but I think the best planto avoid any further dispute is for us to break up at once.<>
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It's my father, my dear,' said Mr. Weller, turning with an explanatoryair to the young lady in the bar; 'blessed if I think he hardly knowswot my other name is.<>
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Samivel, Samivel,' said Mr. Weller, inreproachful accents, 'I didn't think you'd ha' done it.<>
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Arter thewarnin' you've had o' your father's wicious propensities; arter allI've said to you upon this here wery subject; arter actiwally seein'and bein' in the company o' your own mother-in-law, vich I should ha'thought wos a moral lesson as no man could never ha' forgotten to hisdyin' day! I didn't think you'd ha' done it, Sammy, I didn't think you'dha' done it!' These reflections were too much for the good old man.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'But don't you think it means more?' inquired Sam.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Yes, I think it is rayther good,' observed Sam, highly flattered.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'No, it don't,' replied Sam, reading on very quickly, to avoidcontesting the point--'"Except of me Mary my dear as your walentine and think over what I'vesaid.<>
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Why, what do youmean?' said Sam; 'you don't think he's a-goin' to be tried at the OldBailey, do you?That ain't no part of the present consideration, Sammy,' replied Mr.Weller.<>
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Mr. Weller communicated this secret with great glee, andwinked so indefatigably after doing so, that Sam began to think he musthave got the TIC DOLOUREUX in his right eyelid.<>
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The foreman smiles, and putsup his watch:--"Well, gentlemen, what do we say, plaintiff or defendant,gentlemen? I rather think, so far as I am concerned, gentlemen,--I say,I rather think--but don't let that influence you--I RATHER think theplaintiff's the man.<>
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" Upon this, two or three other men are sure to saythat they think so too--as of course they do; and then they get on veryunanimously and comfortably.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Counsel usually begin in this way, because it puts the jury on the verybest terms with themselves, and makes them think what sharp fellowsthey must be.<>
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Bardell was not very fond ofthe baker, but should think that the baker was not very fond of Mrs.<>
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You'll think better of that, before nextterm, Mr. Pickwick.<>
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I think none of us have ever been there.<>
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Nobody had; and as the proposition was warmly seconded by Perker, whoconsidered it extremely probable that if Mr. Pickwick saw a littlechange and gaiety he would be inclined to think better of hisdetermination, and worse of a debtor's prison, it was carriedunanimously; and Sam was at once despatched to the White Horse Cellar,to take five places by the half-past seven o'clock coach, next morning.<>
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I should think they wos,' replied Sam.<>
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For the sake o' your feller-creeturs, keep yourself as quiet as you can;only think what a loss you would be!' With these pathetic words, SamWeller departed.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Good God, Jane, how can you think of such things?' replied the mammaindignantly.<>
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You cannot help thinking howquickly the time passes with them, which drags so heavily with you; andthe more you think of this, the more your hopes of their speedy arrivaldecline.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) At length Mr. Winkle began to dream that he was at a club, and that themembers being very refractory, the chairman was obliged to hammer thetable a good deal to preserve order; then he had a confused notion of anauction room where there were no bidders, and the auctioneer was buyingeverything in; and ultimately he began to think it just within thebounds of possibility that somebody might be knocking at the streetdoor.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'What did you think of 'em, Sir?I thought they was particklery unpleasant,' replied Sam.<>
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Well, well, Mr. Weller,' said the gentleman in blue, 'I think she hasremarked my air and manner, Mr. Weller.<>
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I should think she couldn't wery well be off o' that,' said Sam.<>
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As it is, I don't think Ican do with anythin' under a female markis.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You think you can find him, Sam?' said Mr. Pickwick, looking earnestlyin his face.<>
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Do what you think necessary.<>
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I think the Church-rates guesses who I am, and I know the Water-worksdoes, because I drew a tooth of his when I first came down here.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) We think we have hinted elsewhere, that Mr. Benjamin Allen had a way ofbecoming sentimental after brandy.<>
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I think there's aprior attachment.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'No, no,' said Mr. Ben Allen, laying aside the poker, and looking verycunning; 'I didn't think Wardle's exactly the place for a headstronggirl; so, as I am her natural protector and guardian, our parents beingdead, I have brought her down into this part of the country to spend afew months at an old aunt's, in a nice, dull, close place.<>
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I think thatwill cure her, my boy.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) He waited so long without this anxiously-expected event occurring, thathe began to think it was not going to take place at all, when he heardlight footsteps upon the gravel, and immediately afterwards beheldArabella walking pensively down the garden.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Wery nice things, if they're managed properly, Sir,' replied Mr.Weller; 'but wen you don't want to be seen, I think they're more usefularter the candle's gone out, than wen it's alight.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Now, it's in the stable, and they'll think the place is afire,' saidSam.<>
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Blessedif I don't think his heart must ha' been born five-and-twenty year arterhis body, at least!'Mr. Winkle stayed not to hear the encomium upon his friend.<>
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What do you think of it, Pruffle?Think of it, Sir?Yes.<>
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I rather think I have!' replied the boy.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You wouldn't think to find such a room as this in the Farringdon Hotel,would you?' said Mr. Roker, with a complacent smile.<>
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I should think,' said Sam, eyeing the piece of furniture in questionwith a look of excessive disgust--'I should think poppies was nothing toit.<>
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"I think you're right, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick, after a few moments'reflection, 'quite right.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You don't think there is any probability of his appropriating the moneyto his own use?' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I should think so,' replied the party addressed, with a strong emphasison the personal pronoun.<>
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I think I can see him now,a-coming up the Strand between the two street-keepers, a little soberedby the bruising, with a patch o' winegar and brown paper over hisright eyelid, and that 'ere lovely bulldog, as pinned the little boyarterwards, a-following at his heels.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think Roker might have chummed you somewhere else,' said Mr. Simpson(for it was the leg), after a very discontented sort of a pause.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Vell, sir,' rejoined Sam, after a short pause, 'I think I see yourdrift; and if I do see your drift, it's my 'pinion that you're a-comin'it a great deal too strong, as the mail-coachman said to the snowstorm,ven it overtook him.<>
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Mr. Weller nodded in a manner which bespoke his inward approval ofthese arrangements; and then, turning to Mr. Pell, said, pointing to hisfriend George--'Ven do you take his cloths off?Why,' replied Mr. Pell, 'he stands third on the opposed list, and Ishould think it would be his turn in about half an hour.<>
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What was I a-saying,gentlemen?I think you was remarkin' as you wouldn't have no objection to anothero' the same, Sir,' said Mr. Weller, with grave facetiousness.<>
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I think she's a-injurin' herself gradivallyvith too much o' that 'ere pine-apple rum, and other strong medicines ofthe same natur.<>
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I think I'd better see arter it at once,' said Sam, still hesitating.<>
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"Howmany crumpets, at a sittin', do you think 'ud kill me off at once?"says the patient.<>
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"I think it might,"says the doctor.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I don't think that,' said Sam, shaking his head.<>
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I think a pipe vould benefit me a good deal.<>
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Wot do you think o' that, for ago o' wanity, warm, Sir?'Mr. Stiggins made no verbal answer, but his manner was expressive.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll tell you wot it is, Samivel, my boy,' whispered the old gentlemaninto his son's ear, after a long and steadfast contemplation of hislady and Mr. Stiggins; 'I think there must be somethin' wrong in yourmother-in-law's inside, as vell as in that o' the red-nosed man.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think it vill, mum,' replied Sam.<>
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Bardell's dead, or Mr.Dodson and Fogg's hung (wich last ewent I think is the most likely tohappen first, Sammy), and then let him come back and write a book aboutthe 'Merrikins as'll pay all his expenses and more, if he blows 'em upenough.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You recollect the gentleman very well, I dare say, Sam,' replied Mr.Pickwick, 'or else you are more unmindful of your old acquaintances thanI think you are.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I should think they had,' exclaimed Mr. Weller, surveying hiscompanion's rags with undisguised wonder.<>
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I think I am better,' responded Job.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well,' said Mr. Pickwick, as Sam and his companion drew nigh, 'youwill see how your health becomes, and think about it meanwhile.<>
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Oh! I should think you was a deal too lively and sought after, to becontent with the country, ma'am,' said little Mrs.<>
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What a comfort itmust be, to you, to think how it's been done! This is the Fleet, ma'am.<>
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But won't it bebetter to see Mr. Perker to-night, so that we may be there, the firstthing in the morning?Why,' responded Lowten, after a little consideration, 'if it was inanybody else's case, Perker wouldn't be best pleased at my going up tohis house; but as it's Mr. Pickwick's, I think I may venture to take acab and charge it to the office.<>
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I rather think the gov'nor wants to have aword and a half with you, Sir.<>
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Now I ask you, my dear sir, not only as your legal adviser,but as your very true friend, will you let slip the occasion ofattaining all these objects, and doing all this good, for the paltryconsideration of a few pounds finding their way into the pockets of acouple of rascals, to whom it makes no manner of difference, except thatthe more they gain, the more they'll seek, and so the sooner be ledinto some piece of knavery that must end in a crash? I have put theseconsiderations to you, my dear Sir, very feebly and imperfectly, butI ask you to think of them.<>
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If you know'd who was near, sir, I rayther think you'd changeyour note; as the hawk remarked to himself vith a cheerful laugh, ven heheerd the robin-redbreast a-singin' round the corner.<>
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I have never ceased to think how great your sufferingsmust have been in this shocking place.<>
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I think Ishould assassinate him, Bob.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'My dear Benjamin,' said the old lady, struggling with a great shortnessof breath, and trembling from head to foot, 'don't be alarmed, my dear,but I think I had better speak to Mr. Sawyer, alone, for a moment.<>
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I should be very sorry to think it was the heart,' said the old lady,with a slight groan.<>
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P'raps that gen'l'm'n may think as there wos apriory 'tachment; but there worn't nothin' o' the sort, for the younglady said in the wery beginnin' o' the keepin' company, that shecouldn't abide him.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) While Mr. Pickwick was mixing his brandy-and-water, the one-eyed manlooked round at him earnestly, from time to time, and at length said--'I think I've seen you before.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, I think he was; I think I may say he was,' answered the one-eyedman.<>
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Indeed, when I come to think of the matter,gentlemen, I feel pretty sure she wouldn't, for she died when my unclewas two years and seven months old, and I think it's very likely that,even without the gravel, his top-boots would have puzzled the good ladynot a little; to say nothing of his jolly red face.<>
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Glancing at all these things with the air of a man who had seenthem too often before, to think them worthy of much notice now, myuncle walked up the middle of the street, with a thumb in each waistcoatpocket, indulging from time to time in various snatches of song, chantedforth with such good-will and spirit, that the quiet honest folk startedfrom their first sleep and lay trembling in bed till the sound diedaway in the distance; when, satisfying themselves that it was only somedrunken ne'er-do-weel finding his way home, they covered themselves upwarm and fell asleep again.<>
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"Only, if this is a privateroom specially ordered for the occasion, I should think the public roommust be a VERY comfortable one;" with this, my uncle sat himself down ina high-backed chair, and took such an accurate measure of the gentleman,with his eyes, that Tiggin and Welps could have supplied him withprinted calico for a suit, and not an inch too much or too little, fromthat estimate alone.<>
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And I think he was right, gentlemen--at least I never heardof any other.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Bless me, you are surely not mad enough to think of leaving yourpatients without anybody to attend them!' remonstrated Mr. Pickwick in avery serious tone.<>
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Don't think of me for a minute,' replied Bob.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'It looks like a case-bottle;' remarked Ben Allen, eyeing the object inquestion through his spectacles with some interest; 'I rather think itbelongs to Bob.<>
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I think it would be best to take it in,' replied Mr. Ben Allen; 'itwould serve him right to take it in and keep it, wouldn't it?It would,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'shall I?I think it the most proper course we could possibly adopt,' repliedBen.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I THINK so,' rejoined Mr. Pickwick, very properly guarding himselfagainst the possibility of stating an untruth; 'mind, I could notundertake to say certainly, without tasting it.<>
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Do you think so?' replied Mr. Pickwick.<>
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I don't think I ever did.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think it's quite impossible to go on to-night,' interposed Ben.<>
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I think I may venture to say that you would not be long inestablishing your opinions on a firm and solid blue basis, sir.<>
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When they came to think itover, however, it occurred to them that they could do it much betterin print, so they recommenced deadly hostilities without delay; and allEatanswill rung with their boldness--on paper.<>
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When they parted,it was somehow or other indispensably necessary for her to go to herroom, and arrange the cap and curls before she could think of presentingherself to her mistress; which preparatory ceremony she went off toperform, bestowing many nods and smiles on Sam over the banisters as shetripped upstairs.<>
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I have done this," shesays, "and I've vasted time and substance on them as has done it morethan me; but I hope ven I'm gone, Veller, that you'll think on me as Iwos afore I know'd them people, and as I raly wos by natur.<>
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Cos a coachman may do vithout suspicion wot othermen may not; 'cos a coachman may be on the wery amicablest terms witheighty mile o' females, and yet nobody think that he ever means to marryany vun among 'em.<>
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Wery kind o' the old lady to think o' me,' said Sam, 'and I'm wery muchobliged to her.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think there's something,' said Stiggins, turning as pale as he couldturn.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Perhaps,' said Mr. Stiggins hesitatingly, after a few moments' deepthought, 'perhaps she recommended me to the care of the man of wrath,Mr. Samuel?I think that's wery likely, from what he said,' rejoined Sam; 'he wosa-speakin' about you, jist now.<>
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What do you think of his going toDemerara, too?What! And giving up what was offered him here!' exclaimed Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Yes, I think you had better.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Do you think he will come round?' inquired Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think he will,' rejoined Perker.<>
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Meanwhile,Dodson said, in an affable manner, to Mr. Pickwick--'I don't think you are looking quite so stout as when I had the pleasureof seeing you last, Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Perker said nothing at all until he had emptied his snuff-box, and sentLowten out to fill it, when he was seized with a fit of laughing, whichlasted five minutes; at the expiration of which time he said thathe supposed he ought to be very angry, but he couldn't think of thebusiness seriously yet--when he could, he would be.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think it is a knock at the door,' said Mr. Pickwick, as if therecould be the smallest doubt of the fact.<>
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Why, I think the girls are all running mad;that's no news, you'll say? Perhaps it's not; but it's true, for allthat.<>
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"Well, pa," she says, "what do you think ofit?" "Why, my dear," I said, "I suppose it's all very well; I hope it'sfor the best.<>
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There now, Mr. Pickwick, if you can make it convenient to reduce youreyes to their usual size again, and to let me hear what you think weought to do, I shall feel rather obliged to you!'The testy manner in which the hearty old gentleman uttered this lastsentence was not wholly unwarranted; for Mr. Pickwick's face had settleddown into an expression of blank amazement and perplexity, quite curiousto behold.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I think you're right,' whispered Wardle across the table.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You think so now,' said Mr. Weller, with the gravity of age, 'butyou'll find that as you get vider, you'll get viser.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I don't think he ever quite recovered them,' replied Pell; 'in fact I'msure he never did.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'However,' said Pell, drawing a chair to the table, 'a professionalman has no right to think of his private friendships when his legalassistance is wanted.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'What did you think of her, now? Candidly, Mr. Weller, what did youthink of her?I thought she wos wery plump, and vell made,' said Mr. Weller, with acritical air.<>
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What did you think of hermanners, from what you saw of her?Wery pleasant,' rejoined Mr. Weller.<>
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Supposing I were desirous of establishing them comfortably asman and wife in some little business or situation, where they might hopeto obtain a decent living, what should you think of it, Mr. Weller?'At first, Mr. Weller received with wry faces a proposition involving themarriage of anybody in whom he took an interest; but, as Mr. Pickwickargued the point with him, and laid great stress on the fact that Marywas not a widow, he gradually became more tractable.<>
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You think so now! S'poseyou wos to change your mind, vich is not unlikely, for you've the spirito' five-and-twenty in you still, what 'ud become on you vithout me? Itcan't be done, Sir, it can't be done.<>
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Some (among whom wasMr. Tupman) were disposed to think that Mr. Pickwick contemplateda matrimonial alliance; but this idea the ladies most strenuouslyrepudiated.<>
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Sosome people got to think you knew without looking, so to speak.<>
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The only way Ican think of stopping it is for you to tell us the secret after all.<>
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If you try to talk about a truth that'smerely moral, people always think it's merely metaphorical.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "And you don't think detective stories allow for that?" asked hisfriend.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well, I think he's innocent myself," said the little priest in acolourless voice.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Why do you think he is innocent?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Because he entered the garden in an irregular fashion," answered thecleric.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Excuse me," said Bagshaw, "but does it matter very much how you camein, unless you propose to confess to the murder?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Yes, I think it does," said the priest mildly.<>
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"The truth is, that whenI came in at the front door I saw something I don't think any of therest of you have seen.<>
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I think he says that Williams hadhair of a vivid unnatural yellow; and that he thought it had been dyedby a trick learned in India, where they dye horses green or blue.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well, Father Brown," he said with a smile; "what do you think of ourjudicial procedure?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well," replied the priest rather absently, "I think the thing thatstruck me most was how different men look in their wigs.<>
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They would think he must be rather eccentric; but he isn't at alleccentric, he's only conventional.<>
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They would think so, because theydon't know anything about English barristers; because they don't knowwhat a barrister is.<>
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God bless my soul!a poet would think nothing of walking about in the same backyard for tenhours if he had a poem to do.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Ah," cried Bagshaw quickly, "you think Green did it, after all.<>
---------------
What I think I said, was thatsomething had happened in the hall.<>
---------------
Yet I think our general experience is thatevery conceivable sort of man has been a saint.<>
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"The list sounds rather long and dull; but I think it'sexhaustive.<>
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I think John has had some business with him.<>
---------------
Do you think cars haven't changed in ten years --androads, too, for that matter? In my little bus you don't know the wheelsare going round.<>
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You think you're just flying.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "But think what fun it will be for your sister to see you arrive in acar!" cried Carver.<>
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You aren't afraid of it, are you?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well," said Mr. Smith, blinking thoughtfully, "I don't want to beselfish, and I don't think I'm afraid-I'll come with you if you put itthat way.<>
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"And what do you think about it?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Devine looked at the little man in black, and something in the gaze ofhis great, grey eyes seemed to renew his impulse.<>
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"But I think I can explain how the business happens to concernyou.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "It is as well to see facts even if they are faces," said Father Brownequably, "and I think the face you saw----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Another knock at the front door sounded through the house, and a minuteafterwards the door of the room opened and another figure appeared.<>
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"But I think there will be nothing for you to worry about.<>
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But you can't think we do nothing.<>
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You can't think we know nothing.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "The very first man I thought of," said Father Brown; "in so far as Ihad any right to think of anybody.<>
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I don't think those tricks have ever been played in anEnglish village, and I should say our friend's goldfish were quitesafe.<>
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"I think yougenerally take a gun to bed with you.<>
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But the fish are gone, God knows how, though I think ourfriend ought to be asked.<>
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I rather think I am under suspicion.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think we are all under suspicion," said the Count.<>
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"I don't think anybody'sseen him, except Dr.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Very well," answered Father Brown, "then I think we'll go indoorsagain.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "No; I think that settles the matter of entrances," said the turnipghost, cheerfully.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Do you think," asked Boyle, 'that the Count or the colonel, or any ofthese Eastern travellers have anything to do with it? Do you think itis--preternatural?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I will grant you this," said the priest gravely, "if the Count, or thecolonel, or any of your neighbours did dress up in Arab masquerade andcreep up to this house in the dark--then it was preternatural.<>
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In the same way, if anything is right in the foreground of ourlife we hardly see it, and if we did we might think it quite odd.<>
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If he could act awizard or a troubadour for six minutes, do you think he could not act aclerk for six weeks?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I am still not quite sure of his object," said Boyle.<>
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But her husband did not think much of problem plays; andcertainly at the moment was more interested in the problem of getting aforeign actress out of a locked room; a new version of the conjuringtrick of the Vanishing Lady.<>
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But he did not seem to think much of the suggestion of suicide.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Is there no sound?" asked the manager anxiously; and then added in alower voice: "Do you think she can have done herself in?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "There is a certain sound," replied Father Brown calmly.<>
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If she had been a German, gone away to think quietly about metaphysicsand weltschmerz, I should be all for breaking the door down.<>
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If only she were marriedto somebody who understood her ideas she might have been one of thegreat actresses of the age; indeed, the highbrow critics still think alot of her.<>
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Idon't even know how she comes there, since it isn't down the passage tothe door; but I think I once saw a veiled or cloaked figure passing outinto the twilight at the back of the theatre, like a ghost.<>
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Idon't think it's love-making.<>
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I think it's blackmail.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "What makes you think that?" asked the other.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "You think he's a bigamist," said Father Brown reflectively.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Do you mean," asked Jarvis with a rather ghastly look, "that theunknown visitor has got in here again? Do you think it's anythingserious?" After a moment he added: "I may be able to push back the bolt;I know the fastening on these doors.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Perhaps we think too much about the stranger," said Father Brown.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Do you mean," asked the other in a lowered voice, "that she's lying andthe Italian did come out?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "No," said the priest calmly; "I think I meant it more or less as adetached study of character.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "The Italian!" cried his friend; "I should think not.<>
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I think she might have got out the other end.<>
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"I don't think Randall atany rate has heard of the story of the strange lady visitor.<>
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By the way,don't you think it probably was the strange woman?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "It depends," said the priest, "whom you mean by the strange woman.<>
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Do you think she reallywas his wife?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "It is possible," said Father Brown, staring blankly into the void,"that she really was his wife.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) There was a silence and then the actor said: "You think she slippedthrough a trap-door behind a screen down to the floor below, where themanager's room was?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "She certainly slipped away in some fashion; and that is the mostprobable fashion," said the other.<>
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"I think it all the more probablebecause she took the opportunity of an undress rehearsal, and evenindeed arranged for one.<>
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There are many littledifficulties, of course, but I think they could all be met in time andin turn.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Yes," said the secretary harshly, "I think I know what has happened toSir Arthur.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think you and Dalmon can testify," he said, "that you saw me sittingthere through your whole journey there and back.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "The only thing I can think of," went on Dr.<>
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"Ifyou will come with me, I think I can give you his address and --and tellyou something rather special about him.<>
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In plain words, you think Dalmon is a blackmailer.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Father Brown reflected for a moment and then said: "I think I shouldlike to go up to the house now and have a talk to Dr.<>
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It's all very beastly, but we don't think there's been-- anyviolence.<>
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"I think it's seeing the face upside down.<>
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Poor Vaudrey diedup in the hamlet, somehow; after all, I don't think he committedsuicide; but the trouble is who would, or could, have killed him up inthat potty little place?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) He began to draw rough designs with the point of his stumpy umbrella onthe strip of sand.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Then you don't think it had anything to do with the story we areconsidering?" asked the secretary, thoughtfully.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think it had a thundering lot to do with the story I am consideringnow," said Father Brown.<>
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? But I think I'llact on my guess till I know.<>
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At least I think I thought I did.<>
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"Looks as if a little flirtation with her might end fatally, doesn'tit?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I don't think he's flirting with her," said Father Brown.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think he's a late sort of host, if it comes to chat," grumbledGranby.<>
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"I think it's very decent of him to see us at all: twototal strangers come to ask him highly personal questions.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Thank you, Sir John," said the priest in a dull voice, "but I think wehad better go.<>
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For the third, I think I do know.<>
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"They are vigorousand long-lived stock, and even in the ordinary way I should think youwould wait a good time for your money.<>
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And what has become of him?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) He paused a moment, and then went on in a more matter-of-fact tone;"When you come to think of it, it's a very good plan for a murder, andmeets the permanent problem of the disposal of the body.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "For my part," he said, screwing in the monocle that was the only gleamin his hard, legal face, "I think we must exhaust the possibilities ofmesmerism before we talk about magic.<>
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But if a man is trading in the truth withthe Germans--well! So I think if a fortune-teller is trading in truthlike that----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "You really think," began Hardcastle grimly.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Yes," said the other; "I think he is trading with the enemy.<>
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"Well," he said, "if Father Brownthinks they're good so long as they're frauds, I should think he'dconsider this copper-coloured prophet a sort of saint.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think there is a via media between sense and nonsense," saidHardcastle, smiling.<>
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Do you know where he has gone?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think so," said his hostess equally gravely.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "If you were to be utterly, unfathomably, silent, do you think you mighthear a cry from the other end of the world? The cry of a worshipperalone in those mountains, where the original image sits, itself like amountain.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I don't think you want to feel any more, do you?" said the priest good-humouredly.<>
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Why don't you think the ruby had been there all thetime?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Only because I put it back myself," said Father Brown.<>
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I don't mind telling you in professional confidence;besides, I don't think the Mounteagles would prosecute, now they've gotthe thing back, especially considering who stole it.<>
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I don't say the Master would steal a ruby, verylikely he wouldn't; very likely he wouldn't think it worth stealing.<>
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He liked us to think that he hadmarvellous mental powers that could make a material object fly throughspace; and even when he hadn't done it, he allowed us to think he had.<>
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We should all be anxious that nobody should think we haddone it.<>
---------------
He was actually anxious that everybody should think he had--evenwhen he hadn't.<>
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The man who really did it wouldnever want us to think he did it, for he also was an English gentleman.<>
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He turned his head over his shoulder andsaid casually;"About a minute and half between the flash and the bang, but I think thestorm's coming nearer.<>
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I think it willbe a deluge.<>
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"He was engaged when I knewhim, as a matter of fact, but I don't think it ever came first with him,and I think it went with the rest when everything else went.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "You think he knows more than she does?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I think he knows more than she says," answered Father Brown.<>
---------------
Since you insist, I will tell you one or two of the things thatmade me think so.<>
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Even if therewere some double-dealing or darker motive not yet understood, onewould think it would be done for the sake of appearances.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Really, Father Brown," said General Outram, "do you honestly think hedeserves this? Is that your Christianity?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Surely the true Christianity," pleaded his wife more gently, "is thatwhich knows all and pardons all; the love that can remember--and forget.<>
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"Or why should you think I am blind?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Because you were blinded--that you might not see," said the priest.<>
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"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Hang it all," exploded the general; "if you think I'm going to bereconciled to a filthy viper like that, I tell you I wouldn't say a wordto save him from hell.<>
---------------
It isn't,if you think what it would really be like to be a revolutionary poet.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Some people would think it was rather morbid," said Grandison Chacedubiously.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Some people," said Father Brown gravely, "undoubtedly do think thatcharity and humility are morbid.<>
---------------
But I most certainly don't want them to think I do itby magic.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well, I'm afraid I do think it's morbid," he said frankly.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "You may think a crime horrible because you could never commit it.<>
---------------
You think of it assomething like an eruption of Vesuvius; but that would not really be soterrible as this house catching fire.<>
---------------
If a criminal suddenly appeared inthis room----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "If a criminal appeared in this room," said Chace, smiling, "I think youwould be a good deal too favourable to him.<>
---------------
Frankly, I don't think it's practical.<>
---------------
Do you think I do not knowall about their way of reprehending it? Have I not heard the sermons ofthe righteous and seen the cold stare of the respectable; have I notbeen lectured in the lofty and distant style, asked how it was possiblefor anyone to fall so low, told that no decent person could ever havedreamed of such depravity? Do you think all that ever did anything butmake me laugh? Only my friend told me that he knew exactly why I stole;and I have never stolen since.<>
---------------
anybody would think you were deaf
= chiunque penserebbe che tu sia sordo ,
---------------
anyone would think you were deaf
= chiunque penserebbe che tu sia sordo ,
---------------
can you think of anyplace he might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anyplace she might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anywhere he might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anywhere she might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
do as you think best
= fa' come credi! ,
---------------
do you think you can compass it by yourself
= credi di farcela da solo? ,
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don't think badly of me
= non pensare male di me ,
---------------
i think we're on to something big
= penso che stiamo per scoprire qualcosa di grosso,
---------------
i think we've had the best of the day
= penso che per oggi abbiamo fatto tanto,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - ideare
Ausiliare:avere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io ideo
tu idei
egli idea
noi ideiamo
voi ideate
essi ideano
Imperfetto
io ideavo
tu ideavi
egli ideava
noi ideavamo
voi ideavate
essi ideavano
Passato remoto
io ideai
tu ideasti
egli ideò
noi ideammo
voi ideaste
essi idearono
Passato prossimo
io ho ideato
tu hai ideato
egli ha ideato
noi abbiamo ideato
voi avete ideato
essi hanno ideato
Trapassato prossimo
io avevo ideato
tu avevi ideato
egli aveva ideato
noi avevamo ideato
voi avevate ideato
essi avevano ideato
Trapassato remoto
io ebbi ideato
tu avesti ideato
egli ebbe ideato
noi avemmo ideato
voi eveste ideato
essi ebbero ideato
Futuro semplice
io ideerò
tu ideerai
egli ideerà
noi ideeremo
voi ideerete
essi ideeranno
Futuro anteriore
io avrò ideato
tu avrai ideato
egli avrà ideato
noi avremo ideato
voi avrete ideato
essi avranno ideato
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io idei
che tu idei
che egli idei
che noi ideiamo
che voi ideiate
che essi ideino
Passato
che io abbia ideato
che tu abbia ideato
che egli abbia ideato
che noi abbiamo ideato
che voi abbiate ideato
che essi abbiano ideato
Imperfetto
che io ideassi
che tu ideassi
che egli ideasse
che noi ideassimo
che voi ideaste
che essi ideassero
Trapassato
che io avessi ideato
che tu avessi ideato
che egli avesse ideato
che noi avessimo ideato
che voi aveste ideato
che essi avessero ideato
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io ideerei
tu ideeresti
egli ideerebbe
noi ideeremmo
voi ideereste
essi ideerebbero
Passato
io avrei ideato
tu avresti ideato
egli avrebbe ideato
noi avremmo ideato
voi avreste ideato
essi avrebbero ideato
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
idea
idei
ideiamo
ideate
ideino
Futuro
-
ideerai
ideerà
ideeremo
ideerete
ideeranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
ideare
Passato
avere ideato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
ideante
Passato
ideato
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
ideando
Passato
avendo ideato
INDICATIVO - passivo
Presente
io sono ideato
tu sei ideato
egli é ideato
noi siamo ideati
voi siete ideati
essi sono ideati
Imperfetto
io ero ideato
tu eri ideato
egli era ideato
noi eravamo ideati
voi eravate ideati
essi erano ideati
Passato remoto
io fui ideato
tu fosti ideato
egli fu ideato
noi fummo ideati
voi foste ideati
essi furono ideati
Passato prossimo
io sono stato ideato
tu sei stato ideato
egli é stato ideato
noi siamo stati ideati
voi siete stati ideati
essi sono stati ideati
Trapassato prossimo
io ero stato ideato
tu eri stato ideato
egli era stato ideato
noi eravamo stati ideati
voi eravate stati ideati
essi erano statiideati
Trapassato remoto
io fui stato ideato
tu fosti stato ideato
egli fu stato ideato
noi fummo stati ideati
voi foste stati ideati
essi furono stati ideati
Futuro semplice
io sarò ideato
tu sarai ideato
egli sarà ideato
noi saremo ideati
voi sarete ideati
essi saranno ideati
Futuro anteriore
io sarò stato ideato
tu sarai stato ideato
egli sarà stato ideato
noi saremo stati ideati
voi sarete stati ideati
essi saranno stati ideati
CONGIUNTIVO - passivo
Presente
che io sia ideato
che tu sia ideato
che egli sia ideato
che noi siamo ideati
che voi siate ideati
che essi siano ideati
Passato
che io sia stato ideato
che tu sia stato ideato
che egli sia stato ideato
che noi siamo stati ideati
che voi siate stati ideati
che essi siano stati ideati
Imperfetto
che io fossi ideato
che tu fossi ideato
che egli fosse ideato
che noi fossimo ideati
che voi foste ideati
che essi fossero ideati
Trapassato
che io fossi stato ideato
che tu fossi stato ideato
che egli fosse stato ideato
che noi fossimo stati ideati
che voi foste stati ideati
che essi fossero stati ideati
CONDIZIONALE - passivo
Presente
io sarei ideato
tu saresti ideato
egli sarebbe ideato
noi saremmo ideati
voi sareste ideati
essi sarebbero ideati
Passato
io sarei stato ideato
tu saresti stato ideato
egli sarebbe stato ideato
noi saremmo stati ideati
voi sareste stati ideati
essi sarebbero stati ideati
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - passivo
Presente
-
sii ideato
sia ideato
siamo ideati
siate ideati
siano ideati
Futuro
-
sarai ideato
sarà ideato
saremo ideati
sarete ideati
saranno ideati
INFINITO - passivo
Presente
essere ideato
Passato
essere stato ideato
PARTICIPIO - passivo
Presente
-
Passato
ideato
 
 
GERUNDIO - passivo
Presente
essendo ideato
Passato
essendo stato ideato
Verb: to think-thought-thought
Ausiliar: to have - transitivo/intransitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I think up
you think up
he/she/it thinks up
we think up
you think up
they think up
Simple past
I thought up
you thought up
he/she/it thought up
we thought up
you thought up
they thought up
Simple past
I thought up
you thought up
he/she/it thought up
we thought up
you thought up
they thought up
Present perfect
I have thought up
you have thought up
he/she/it has thought up
we have thought up
you have thought up
they have thought up
Past perfect
I had thought up
you had thought up
he/she/it had thought up
we had thought up
you had thought up
they had thought up
Past perfect
I had thought up
you had thought up
he/she/it had thought up
we had thought up
you had thought up
they had thought up
Simple future
I will think up
you will think up
he/she/it will think up
we will think up
you will think up
they will think up
Future perfect
I will have thought up
you will have thought up
he/she/it will have thought up
we will have thought up
you will have thought up
they will have thought up
Present continuous
I am thinking up
you are thinking up
he/she/it is thinking up
we are thinking up
you are thinking up
they are thinking up
Past simple continuous
I was thinking up
you were thinking up
he/she/it was thinking up
we were thinking up
you were thinking up
they were thinking up
Future continuous
I will be thinking up
you will be thinking up
he/she/it will be thinking up
we will be thinking up
you will be thinking up
they will be thinking up
Future perfect continuous
I will have been thinking up
you will have been thinking up
he/she/it will have been thinking up
we will have been thinking up
you will have been thinking up
they will have been thinking up
Present perfect continuous
I have been thinking up
you have been thinking up
he/she/it has been thinking up
we have been thinking up
you have been thinking up
they have been thinking up
Past perfect continuous
I had been thinking up
you had been thinking up
he/she/it had been thinking up
we had been thinking up
you had been thinking up
they had been thinking up
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I think up
That you think up
That he/she/it think up
That we think up
That you think up
That they think up
Present perfect
That I have thought up
That you have thought up
That he/she/it have thought up
That we have thought up
That you have thought up
That they have thought up
Simple past
That I thought up
That you thought up
That he/she/it thought up
That we thought up
That you thought up
That they thought up
Past perfect
That I had thought up
That you had thought up
That he/she/it had thought up
That we had thought up
That you had thought up
That they had thought up
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would think up
you would think up
we would think up
we would think up
you would think up
they would think up
Past
I would have thought
you would have thought
he/she/it would have thought
we would have thought
you would have thought
they would have thought
Present continous
I would be thinking up
you would be thinking up
we would be thinking up
we would be thinking up
you would be thinking up
they would be thinking up
Past continous
I would have been thinking
you would have been thinking
he/she/it would have been thinking
we would have been thinking
you would have been thinking
they would have been thinking
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
let me think up
think up
let him think up
let us think up
think up
let them think up
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to think
Past
to have thought
Present continous
to be thinking
Perfect continous
to have been thinking
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
thinking
Past
thought
Perfect
having thought
Affermative - GERUND
Present
thinking
Past
having thought
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do not think up
you do not think up
he/she/it does not thinks up
we do not think up
you do not think up
they do not think up
Simple past
I did not think up
you did not think up
he/she/it did not think up
we did not think up
you did not think up
they did not think up
Simple past
I did not think up
you did not think up
he/she/it did not think up
we did not think up
you did not think up
they did not think up
Present perfect
I have not thought up
you have not thought up
he/she/it has not thought up
we have not thought up
you have not thought up
they have not thought up
Past perfect
I had not thought up
you had not thought up
he/she/it had not thought up
we had not thought up
you had not thought up
they had not thought up
Past perfect
I had not thought up
you had not thought up
he/she/it had not thought up
we had not thought up
you had not thought up
they had not thought up
Simple future
I will not think up
you will not think up
he/she/it will not think up
we will not think up
you will not think up
they will not think up
Future perfect
I will not have thought up
you will not have thought up
he/she/it will not have thought up
we will not have thought up
you will not have thought up
they will not have thought up
Present continuous
I am not thinking up
you are not thinking up
he/she/it is not thinking up
we are not thinking up
you are not thinking up
they are not thinking up
Past simple continuous
I was not thinking up
you were not thinking up
he/she/it was not thinking up
we were not thinking up
you were not thinking up
they were not thinking up
Future continuous
I will not be thinking up
you will not be thinking up
he/she/it will not be thinking up
we will not be thinking up
you will not be thinking up
they will not be thinking up
Future perfect continuous
I will not have been thinking up
you will not have been thinking up
he/she/it will not have been thinking up
we will not have been thinking up
you will not have been thinking up
they will not have been thinking up
Present perfect continuous
I have not been thinking up
you have not been thinking up
he/she/it has not been thinking up
we have not been thinking up
you have not been thinking up
they have not been thinking up
Past perfect continuous
I had not been thinking up
you had not been thinking up
he/she/it had not been thinking up
we had not been thinking up
you had not been thinking up
they had not been thinking up
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do not think up
That you do not think up
That he/she/it does not think up
That we do not think up
That you do not think up
That they do not think up
Present perfect
That I have not thought up
That you have not thought up
That he/she/it have not thought up
That we have not thought up
That you have not thought up
That they have not thought up
Simple past
That I did not think up
That you did not think up
That he/she/it did not think up
That we did not think up
That you did not think up
That they did not think up
Past perfect
That I had not thought up
That you had not thought up
That he/she/it had not thought up
That we had not thought up
That you had not thought up
That they had not thought up
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not think up
you would not think up
we would not think up
we would not think up
you would not think up
they would not think up
Past
I would not have thought
you would not have thought
he/she/it would not have thought
we would not have thought
you would not have thought
they would not have thought
Present continous
I would not be thinking up
you would not be thinking up
we would not be thinking up
we would not be thinking up
you would not be thinking up
they would not be thinking up
Past continous
I would not have been thinking
you would not have been thinking
he/she/it would not have been thinking
we would not have been thinking
you would not have been thinking
they would not have been thinking
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
do not let me think up
do not think up
do not let him think up
do not let us think up
do not think up
do not let them think up
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to think
Past
not to have thought
Present continous
not to be thinking
Perfect continous
not to have been thinking
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not thinking
Past
not thought
Perfect
not having thought
Negative - GERUND
Present
not thinking
Past
not having thought
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I think up?
do you think up?
does she/he/it thinks up?
do we think up?
do you think up?
do they think up?
Simple past
did I think up?
did you think up?
did she/he/it think up?
did we think up?
did you think up?
did they think up?
Simple past
did I think up?
did you think up?
did she/he/it think up?
did we think up?
did you think up?
did they think up?
Present perfect
have I thought up?
have you thought up?
has she/he/it thought up?
have we thought up?
have you thought up?
have they thought up?
Past perfect
had I thought up?
had you thought up?
had she/he/it thought up?
had we thought up?
had you thought up?
had they thought up?
Past perfect
had I thought up?
had you thought up?
had she/he/it thought up?
had we thought up?
had you thought up?
had they thought up?
Simple future
will I think up?
will you think up?
will she/he/it think up?
will we think up?
will you think up?
will they think up?
Future perfect
will I have thought up?
will you have thought up?
will she/he/it have thought up?
will we have thought up?
will you have thought up?
will they have thought up?
Present continuous
am I thinking up?
are you thinking up?
is she/he/it thinking up?
are we thinking up?
are you thinking up?
are they thinking up?
Past simple continuous
was I thinking up?
were you thinking up?
was she/he/it thinking up?
were we thinking up?
were you thinking up?
were they thinking up?
Future continuous
will I be thinking up?
will you be thinking up?
will she/he/it be thinking up?
will we be thinking up?
will you be thinking up?
will they be thinking up?
Future perfect continuous
will I have been thinking up?
will you have been thinking up?
will she/he/it have been thinking up?
will we have been thinking up?
will you have been thinking up?
will they have been thinking up?
Present perfect continuous
have I been thinking up?
have you been thinking up?
has she/he/it been thinking up?
have we been thinking up?
have you been thinking up?
have they been thinking up?
Past perfect continuous
had I been thinking up?
had you been thinking up?
had she/he/it been thinking up?
had we been thinking up?
had you been thinking up?
had they been thinking up?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I think up?
That do you think up?
That does she/he/it think up?
That do we think up?
That do you think up?
That do they think up?
Present perfect
That have I thought up?
That have you thought up?
That have she/he/it thought up?
That have we thought up?
That have you thought up?
That have they thought up?
Simple past
That did I think up?
That did you think up?
That did she/he/it think up?
That did we think up?
That did you think up?
That did they think up?
Past perfect
That had I thought up?
That had you thought up?
That had she/he/it thought up?
That had we thought up?
That had you thought up?
That had they thought up?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I think up?
would you think up?
would she/he/it think up?
would we think up?
would you think up?
would they think up?
Past
would I have thought?
would you have thought?
would she/he/it have thought?
would we have thought?
would you have thought?
would they have thought?
Present continous
would I be thinking up?
would you be thinking up?
would she/he/it be thinking up?
would we be thinking up?
would you be thinking up?
would they be thinking up?
Past continous
would I have been thinking?
would you have been thinking?
would she/he/it have been thinking?
would we have been thinking?
would you have been thinking?
would they have been thinking?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not think up?
do you not think up?
does she/he/it not thinks up?
do we not think up?
do you not think up?
do they not think up?
Simple past
did I not think up?
did you not think up?
did she/he/it not think up?
did we not think up?
did you not think up?
did they not think up?
Simple past
did I not think up?
did you not think up?
did she/he/it not think up?
did we not think up?
did you not think up?
did they not think up?
Present perfect
have I not thought up?
have you not thought up?
has she/he/it not thought up?
have we not thought up?
have you not thought up?
have they not thought up?
Past perfect
had I not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had she/he/it not thought up?
had we not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had they not thought up?
Past perfect
had I not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had she/he/it not thought up?
had we not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had they not thought up?
Simple future
will I not think up?
will you not think up?
will she/he/it not think up?
will we not think up?
will you not think up?
will they not think up?
Future perfect
will I not have thought up?
will you not have thought up?
will she/he/it not have thought up?
will we not have thought up?
will you not have thought up?
will they not have thought up?
Present continuous
am I not thinking up?
are you not thinking up?
is she/he/it not thinking up?
are we not thinking up?
are you not thinking up?
are they not thinking up?
Past simple continuous
was I not thinking up?
were you not thinking up?
was she/he/it not thinking up?
were we not thinking up?
were you not thinking up?
were they not thinking up?
Future continuous
will I not be thinking up?
will you not be thinking up?
will she/he/it not be thinking up?
will we not be thinking up?
will you not be thinking up?
will they not be thinking up?
Future perfect continuous
will I not have been thinking up?
will you not have been thinking up?
will she/he/it not have been thinking up?
will we not have been thinking up?
will you not have been thinking up?
will they not have been thinking up?
Present perfect continuous
have I not been thinking up?
have you not been thinking up?
has she/he/it not been thinking up?
have we not been thinking up?
have you not been thinking up?
have they not been thinking up?
Past perfect continuous
had I not been thinking up?
had you not been thinking up?
had she/he/it not been thinking up?
had we not been thinking up?
had you not been thinking up?
had they not been thinking up?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not think up?
That do you not think up?
That does she/he/it not think up?
That do we not think up?
That do you not think up?
That do they not think up?
Present perfect
That have I not thought up?
That have you not thought up?
That have she/he/it not thought up?
That have we not thought up?
That have you not thought up?
That have they not thought up?
Simple past
That did I not think up?
That did you not think up?
That did she/he/it not think up?
That did we not think up?
That did you not think up?
That did they not think up?
Past perfect
That had I not thought up?
That had you not thought up?
That had she/he/it not thought up?
That had we not thought up?
That had you not thought up?
That had they not thought up?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not think up?
would you not think up?
would she/he/it not think up?
would we not think up?
would you not think up?
would they not think up?
Past
would I not have thought?
would you not have thought?
would she/he/it not have thought?
would we not have thought?
would you not have thought?
would they not have thought?
Present continous
would I not be thinking up?
would you not be thinking up?
would she/he/it not be thinking up?
would we not be thinking up?
would you not be thinking up?
would they not be thinking up?
Past continous
would I not have been thinking?
would you not have been thinking?
would she/he/it not have been thinking?
would we not have been thinking?
would you not have been thinking?
would they not have been thinking?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present