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Inglese

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sinonimi di
be
Italiano
Vocabolario e frasi
antisciopero
= volto a impedire o a scoraggiare lo sciopero
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antitrust
= provvedimento che tende a impedire o a scoraggiare la costituzione di monopoli
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cagliare
= verbo intr. scoraggiarsi, avere paura
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deterrente
= - arma così temibile da scoraggiare eventuali aggressioni
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disanimare
= verbo trans . far perdere d'animo - scoraggiare
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esanimare
= verbo trans . scoraggiare
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picchettaggio
= durante uno sciopero , il presidiare in gruppo le entrate dei luoghi di lavoro allo scopo di scoraggiare o impedire l'ingresso di coloro che non aderiscono o che sono incerti sulla condotta da seguire .
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protezionismo
= politica economica che mira a proteggere i prodotti nazionali dalla concorrenza straniera mediante dazi doganali , crediti alle esportazioni e altre misure dirette a scoraggiare le importazioni o a promuovere le esportazioni o altri interventi .
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sconfortare
= verbo transitivo demoralizzare , scoraggiare , deprimere ,
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scoraggiante
= participio presente di scoraggiare , che scoraggia , che deprime ,
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scoraggiato
= participio passato di scoraggiare - che ha perduto coraggio o fiducia ,
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scoraggire
= verbo transitivo scoraggiare .
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scorare
= verbo transitivo scoraggiare , sfiduciare , avvilire .
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Inglese
Vocabolario e frasi
of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.
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* However little known the feelings or views of such a man may be on his
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"Oh! Single, my dear, to be sure! A single man of large fortune; four or
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"My dear Mr. Bennet," replied his wife, "how can you be so tiresome! You
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them by themselves, which perhaps will be still better, for as you are
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I do not pretend to be anything extraordinary now. When a woman has five
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newcomers. Indeed you must go, for it will be impossible for us to
---------------
"You are over-scrupulous, surely. I dare say Mr. Bingley will be very
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* "It will be no use to us, if twenty such should come, since you will not
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till the day before; so it will be impossible for her to introduce him,
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myself; how can you be so teasing?"
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"What can be the meaning of that emphatic exclamation?" cried he. "Do
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pleasant, I can tell you, to be making new acquaintances every day; but
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agreeable, and, to crown the whole, he meant to be at the next assembly
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with a large party. Nothing could be more delightful! To be fond of
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was obliged to be in town the following day, and, consequently, unable
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he might be always flying about from one place to another, and never
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pronounced him to be a fine figure of a man, the ladies declared he
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proud; to be above his company, and above being pleased; and not all
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forbidding, disagreeable countenance, and being unworthy to be compared
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it would be insupportable. Your sisters are engaged, and there is not
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another woman in the room whom it would not be a punishment to me to
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"I would not be so fastidious as you are," cried Mr. Bingley, "for a
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fortunate enough never to be without partners, which was all that they
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the stranger would be disappointed; but he soon found out that he had a
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Jane was so admired, nothing could be like it. Everybody said how well
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could be more natural than his asking you again? He could not help
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* "I would not wish to be hasty in censuring anyone; but I always speak
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good sense, to be so honestly blind to the follies and nonsense of
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everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design--to take the
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either attention or pleasure. Miss Bennet he acknowledged to be pretty,
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* Mrs. Hurst and her sister allowed it to be so--but still they admired
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her and liked her, and pronounced her to be a sweet girl, and one
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* Lady Lucas was a very good kind of woman, not too clever to be a
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beyond a doubt; there cannot be two opinions on that point.'"
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is he?--poor Eliza!--to be only just tolerable.
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* "I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by his
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ill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quite
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a misfortune to be liked by him. Mrs. Long told me last night that he
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to be proud.
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found to be intolerable, and the younger sisters not worth speaking to,
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way to be very much in love; but she considered with pleasure that it
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was not likely to be discovered by the world in general, since Jane
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* "It may perhaps be pleasant," replied Charlotte, "to be able to impose
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it will then be but poor consolation to believe the world equally in
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very few of us who have heart enough to be really in love without
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perceive her regard for him, he must be a simpleton, indeed, not to
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every moment should be employed in conversing together. Jane should
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attention. When she is secure of him, there will be more leisure for
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she cannot even be certain of the degree of her own regard nor of its
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chance of happiness as if she were to be studying his character for a
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allowed her to be pretty; he had looked at her without admiration at the
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in her form, he was forced to acknowledge her figure to be light and
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* "It will be her turn soon to be teased," said Miss Lucas. "I am going
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really rather not sit down before those who must be in the habit of
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she added, "Very well, if it must be so, it must." And gravely glancing
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* "Do you not think it would be a proper compliment to the place?"
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* Mr. Darcy, with grave propriety, requested to be allowed the honour of
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* "You are considering how insupportable it would be to pass many evenings
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to matrimony, in a moment. I knew you would be wishing me joy.
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absolutely settled. You will be having a charming mother-in-law, indeed;
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and, of course, she will always be at Pemberley with you.
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"From all that I can collect by your manner of talking, you must be two
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* "I am astonished, my dear," said Mrs. Bennet, "that you should be so
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of anybody's children, it should not be of my own, however.
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* "If my children are silly, I must hope to be always sensible of it.
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we shall be in danger of hating each other for the rest of our lives,
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* "That would be a good scheme," said Elizabeth, "if you were sure that
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will be answered.
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Jones--therefore do not be alarmed if you should hear of his having been
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should die, it would be a comfort to know that it was all in pursuit of
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colds. She will be taken good care of. As long as she stays there, it is
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the carriage was not to be had; and as she was no horsewoman, walking
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* "How can you be so silly," cried her mother, "as to think of such a
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thing, in all this dirt! You will not be fit to be seen when you get
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* "I shall be very fit to see Jane--which is all I want.
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when one has a motive; only three miles. I shall be back by dinner.
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impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion,
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exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.
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well enough to leave her room. Elizabeth was glad to be taken to her
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examined his patient, said, as might be supposed, that she had caught
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pronounced to be very bad indeed, a mixture of pride and impertinence;
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nonsensical to come at all! Why must she be scampering about the
---------------
* "Your picture may be very exact, Louisa," said Bingley; "but this was
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them to be playing high she declined it, and making her sister the
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I hope it will be soon increased by seeing her quite well.
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"It ought to be good," he replied, "it has been the work of many
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she be as tall as I am?"
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to be so very accomplished as they all are.
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* "Oh! certainly," cried his faithful assistant, "no one can be really
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will be but half-deserved.
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that Mr. Jones should be sent for early in the morning, if Miss Bennet
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attention might be paid to the sick lady and her sister.
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* "Removed!" cried Bingley. "It must not be thought of. My sister, I am
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should resolve to quit Netherfield, I should probably be off in five
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* "I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen
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studier of character. It must be an amusing study.
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advantages, and I can be equally happy in either.
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such a variety of people to be met with in the country as in the town,
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which you must acknowledge to be true.
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of my own child, but to be sure, Jane--one does not often see anybody
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strong already. But if it be only a slight, thin sort of inclination, I
---------------
tremble lest her mother should be exposing herself again. She longed to
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abruptly reminded him of his promise; adding, that it would be the most
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the ball. But you would not wish to be dancing when she is ill.
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* Lydia declared herself satisfied. "Oh! yes--it would be much better to
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would be at Meryton again. And when you have given your ball," she
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Forster it will be quite a shame if he does not.
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could not be prevailed on to join in their censure of her, in spite of
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* "How delighted Miss Darcy will be to receive such a letter!"
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you should be gone in five minutes, you meant it to be a sort of
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undone, and can be of no real advantage to yourself or anyone else?"
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I believe what I said of myself to be true, and I believe it at this
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you would be gone with such celerity. Your conduct would be quite as
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with the desire, without waiting to be argued into it?"
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"Will it not be advisable, before we proceed on this subject, to
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weight in the argument, Miss Bennet, than you may be aware of. I assure
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Bennet will defer yours till I am out of the room, I shall be very
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on her. She hardly knew how to suppose that she could be an object of
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should be in some danger.
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* Miss Bingley saw, or suspected enough to be jealous; and her great
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"Oh! yes. Do let the portraits of your uncle and aunt Phillips be placed
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"It would not be easy, indeed, to catch their expression, but their
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to uncommon advantage. The picturesque would be spoilt by admitting a
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to the other side of the fireplace, that she might be further from
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book! When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable if I have not
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not some among us to whom a ball would be rather a punishment than a
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tedious in the usual process of such a meeting. It would surely be much
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interfere. "What could he mean? She was dying to know what could be his
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"Not at all," was her answer; "but depend upon it, he means to be severe
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on us, and our surest way of disappointing him will be to ask nothing
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as you are, you must know how it is to be done.
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* "Mr. Darcy is not to be laughed at!" cried Elizabeth. "That is an
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actions--may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in
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superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.
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would perhaps be called resentful. My good opinion once lost, is lost
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next morning to their mother, to beg that the carriage might be sent for
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resolved--nor did she much expect it would be asked; and fearful, on the
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that morning should be mentioned, and the request made.
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she felt herself to be right.
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He wisely resolved to be particularly careful that no sign of admiration
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had actually been hinted that Colonel Forster was going to be married.
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Bingley, I am sure! Well, I am sure I shall be extremely glad to see Mr.
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in the world, that your estate should be entailed away from your own
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But if you will listen to his letter, you may perhaps be a little
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seem disrespectful to his memory for me to be on good terms with anyone
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with whom it had always pleased him to be at variance.--'There, Mrs.
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ladyship, and be ever ready to perform those rites and ceremonies which
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will be kindly overlooked on your side, and not lead you to reject the
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offered olive-branch. I cannot be otherwise than concerned at being the
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said Mr. Bennet, as he folded up the letter. "He seems to be a most
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prove a valuable acquaintance, especially if Lady Catherine should be so
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he is disposed to make them any amends, I shall not be the person to
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* "He must be an oddity, I think," said she. "I cannot make him
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would help it if he could.--Could he be a sensible man, sir?"
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need of encouragement, nor inclined to be silent himself. He was a
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prove so, for else they will be destitute enough. Things are settled so
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will go when once they come to be entailed.
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her charming daughter seemed born to be a duchess, and that the most
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elevated rank, instead of giving her consequence, would be adorned by
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compliments as may be adapted to ordinary occasions, I always wish to
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announced it to be from a circulating library), he started back, and
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me, I confess; for, certainly, there can be nothing so advantageous to
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to the avowal of his hopes, that a mistress might be found for it at
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to hint, was likely to be very soon engaged.
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house, he was used to be free from them there; his civility, therefore,
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the younger ones was then no longer to be gained by him. Their eyes were
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deigned to return. What could be the meaning of it? It was impossible to
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however, might be justified by his relationship to the young ladies who
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or both, had they appeared to be in the wrong, she could no more explain
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that the commonest, dullest, most threadbare topic might be rendered
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* "I know little of the game at present," said he, "but I shall be glad
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* "You may well be surprised, Miss Bennet, at such an assertion, after
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too long and too well to be a fair judge. It is impossible for me
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to be impartial. But I believe your opinion of him would in general
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* "I cannot pretend to be sorry," said Wickham, after a short
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interruption, "that he or that any man should not be estimated beyond
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high and imposing manners, and sees him only as he chooses to be seen.
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* "I should take him, even on my slight acquaintance, to be an
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likely to be in this country much longer.
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not be affected by his being in the neighbourhood.
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* "Oh! no--it is not for me to be driven away by Mr. Darcy. If he
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will be disregarded? Why did you not seek legal redress?"
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* "This is quite shocking! He deserves to be publicly disgraced.
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* "Some time or other he will be--but it shall not be by me. Till I
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must be dreadful.
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appears to do so much credit to--but he gave up everything to be of
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motive, that he should not have been too proud to be dishonest--for
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"Yes. It has often led him to be liberal and generous, to give his money
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want abilities. He can be a conversible companion if he thinks it worth
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Bingley. Vain indeed must be all her attentions, vain and useless her
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* "I believe her to be both in a great degree," replied Wickham; "I have
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Wickham's attentions. There could be no conversation in the noise
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knew not how to believe that Mr. Darcy could be so unworthy of Mr.
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business? Do clear them too, or we shall be obliged to think ill of
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it places Mr. Darcy, to be treating his father's favourite in such
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character, could be capable of it. Can his most intimate friends be so
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myself, that I shall hope to be honoured with the hands of all my fair
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to take the hint, being well aware that a serious dispute must be the
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once. No aunt, no officers, no news could be sought after--the very
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might be won in the course of the evening. But in an instant arose
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* "Heaven forbid! That would be the greatest misfortune of all! To find
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hand, Charlotte could not help cautioning her in a whisper, not to be a
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now we may be silent.
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some, conversation ought to be so arranged, as that they may have the
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something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to
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said he. "How near it may be to mine, I cannot pretend to say. You
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as may ensure his making friends--whether he may be equally capable of
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* "I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be
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* "And never allow yourself to be blinded by prejudice?"
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to be secure of judging properly at first.
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* "His guilt and his descent appear by your account to be the same," said
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you may be sure of my pardon.
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which there could be no difference of sentiment. Elizabeth listened with
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I believe him to be Lady Catherine's nephew. It will be in my power to
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it was not in the least necessary there should be any notice on either
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understanding; but permit me to say, that there must be a wide
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profit by your advice, which on every other subject shall be my constant
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* "I have no reason, I assure you," said he, "to be dissatisfied with my
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Jane, and to be certain that they must desire the connection as much as
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she might not be obliged to go into company more than she liked. It was
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concluded with many good wishes that Lady Lucas might soon be equally
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* "What is Mr. Darcy to me, pray, that I should be afraid of him? I am
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sure we owe him no such particular civility as to be obliged to say
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* "For heaven's sake, madam, speak lower. What advantage can it be for you
---------------
of the table, the hint of a hope that she might be prevailed on to
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interference, lest Mary should be singing all night. He took the hint,
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* "If I," said Mr. Collins, "were so fortunate as to be able to sing, I
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to assert that we can be justified in devoting too much of our time
---------------
to music, for there are certainly other things to be attended to. The
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such an agreement for tithes as may be beneficial to himself and not
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that remains will not be too much for his parish duties, and the care
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and improvement of his dwelling, which he cannot be excused from making
---------------
been spoken so loud as to be heard by half the room. Many stared--many
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feelings were not of a sort to be much distressed by the folly which he
---------------
disengaged, he never came near enough to speak. She felt it to be the
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will be very happy--I am sure she can have no objection. Come, Kitty, I
---------------
consideration making her also sensible that it would be wisest to get it
---------------
dissemble; my attentions have been too marked to be mistaken. Almost as
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subject, perhaps it would be advisable for me to state my reasons for
---------------
a gentlewoman for my sake; and for your own, let her be an active,
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intention in favour of matrimony; it remains to be told why my views
---------------
the loss to them might be as little as possible, when the melancholy
---------------
aware that it could not be complied with; and that one thousand pounds
---------------
in the four per cents, which will not be yours till after your mother's
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decease, is all that you may ever be entitled to. On that head,
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therefore, I shall be uniformly silent; and you may assure yourself that
---------------
disapprove of you. And you may be certain when I have the honour of
---------------
* "Indeed, Mr. Collins, all praise of me will be unnecessary. You
---------------
know it to be the established custom of your sex to reject a man on
---------------
encourage my suit as would be consistent with the true delicacy of the
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means certain that another offer of marriage may ever be made you. Your
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rather be paid the compliment of being believed sincere. I thank you
---------------
encouragement, to apply to her father, whose negative might be uttered
---------------
in such a manner as to be decisive, and whose behaviour at least could
---------------
not be mistaken for the affectation and coquetry of an elegant female.
---------------
of which he trusted he had every reason to be satisfied, since the
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glad to be equally satisfied that her daughter had meant to encourage
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altogether be a very desirable wife to a man in my situation, who
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* "Let her be called down. She shall hear my opinion.
---------------
present occasion; and secondly, of my room. I shall be glad to have the
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to maintain you when your father is dead. I shall not be able to keep
---------------
"My dear madam," replied he, "let us be for ever silent on this point.
---------------
Far be it from me," he presently continued, in a voice that marked his
---------------
behalf. My conduct may, I fear, be objectionable in having accepted my
---------------
Mr. Darcy; that to be in the same room, the same party with him for so
---------------
many hours together, might be more than I could bear, and that scenes
---------------
nothing in it really to lament; it was not to be supposed that their
---------------
intercourse you have known as friends will be renewed with yet greater
---------------
satisfaction as sisters? Mr. Bingley will not be detained in London by
---------------
took him to London might be concluded in three or four days; but as we
---------------
are certain it cannot be so, and at the same time convinced that when
---------------
Charles gets to town he will be in no hurry to leave it again, we have
---------------
determined on following him thither, that he may not be obliged to spend
---------------
beaux will be so numerous as to prevent your feeling the loss of the
---------------
* "Why will you think so? It must be his own doing. He is his own
---------------
Caroline neither expects nor wishes me to be her sister; that she is
---------------
put me on my guard? Can there be any other opinion on the subject?"
---------------
Tuesday, or that it will be in her power to persuade him that, instead
---------------
will not take comfort in mine. Believe her to be deceived, by all means.
---------------
* "But, my dear sister, can I be happy, even supposing the best, in
---------------
though I should be exceedingly grieved at their disapprobation, I could
---------------
Bingley would be soon down again and soon dining at Longbourn, and the
---------------
till its success might be known likewise; for though feeling almost
---------------
opinion, that whenever Mr. Collins should be in possession of the
---------------
Longbourn estate, it would be highly expedient that both he and his wife
---------------
in general satisfactory. Mr. Collins, to be sure, was neither sensible
---------------
be imaginary. But still he would be her husband. Without thinking highly
---------------
and however uncertain of giving happiness, must be their pleasantest
---------------
shaken, her feelings must be hurt by such a disapprobation. She resolved
---------------
dutifully given, but it could not be kept without difficulty; for the
---------------
said how happy they should be to see him at Longbourn again, whenever
---------------
you may be very certain that I shall avail myself of it as soon as
---------------
* "You cannot be too much upon your guard. Risk anything rather than her
---------------
displeasure; and if you find it likely to be raised by your coming to us
---------------
and be satisfied that we shall take no offence.
---------------
my absence may not be long enough to render it necessary, I shall now
---------------
"Why should you be surprised, my dear Eliza? Do you think it incredible
---------------
that Mr. Collins should be able to procure any woman's good opinion,
---------------
* "I see what you are feeling," replied Charlotte. "You must be surprised,
---------------
not exactly like her own, but she had not supposed it to be possible
---------------
was impossible for that friend to be tolerably happy in the lot she had
---------------
protested he must be entirely mistaken; and Lydia, always unguarded and
---------------
him through it all; and though he begged leave to be positive as to the
---------------
happiness that might be expected from the match, the excellent character
---------------
happy together; and fourthly, that the match might be broken off. Two
---------------
as he did experience he pronounced to be of a most agreeable sort; for
---------------
* Lady Lucas could not be insensible of triumph on being able to retort
---------------
never be shaken, and for whose happiness she grew daily more anxious,
---------------
he hoped to be able to return on Monday fortnight; for Lady Catherine,
---------------
place as soon as possible, which he trusted would be an unanswerable
---------------
his sisters would be successful in keeping him away. Unwilling as
---------------
Darcy and the amusements of London might be too much, she feared, for
---------------
them, she concluded her to be anticipating the hour of possession; and
---------------
Lucas should ever be mistress of this house, that I should be forced to
---------------
better things. Let us flatter ourselves that I may be the survivor.
---------------
* "Let us be thankful that you are preserved from a state of such
---------------
* "I never can be thankful, Mr. Bennet, for anything about the entail. How
---------------
she thought he must be sensible himself. It was a subject, in short,
---------------
on which reflection would be long indulged, and must be unavailing. She
---------------
I will not repine. It cannot last long. He will be forgot, and we shall
---------------
all be as we were before.
---------------
little dependence that can be placed on the appearance of merit or
---------------
could be benefited by such a belief as this; for were I persuaded that
---------------
Jane; "and I hope you will be convinced of it by seeing them happy
---------------
saying your opinion of him is sunk. We must not be so ready to fancy
---------------
to be always so guarded and circumspect. It is very often nothing but
---------------
* "If it is designedly done, they cannot be justified; but I have no idea
---------------
unhappy, there may be error, and there may be misery. Thoughtlessness,
---------------
"but this may be from better feelings than you are supposing. They have
---------------
her better. But, whatever may be their own wishes, it is very unlikely
---------------
the best light, in the light in which it may be understood.
---------------
comfort was that Mr. Bingley must be down again in the summer.
---------------
being married, a girl likes to be crossed a little in love now and then.
---------------
Saturday. The pain of separation, however, might be alleviated on his
---------------
them, but so it is. It makes me very nervous and poorly, to be thwarted
---------------
would be prevailed upon to go back with us? Change of scene might be
---------------
of service--and perhaps a little relief from home may be as useful as
---------------
correspond with his sister? She will not be able to help calling.
---------------
his affection might be reanimated, and the influence of his friends
---------------
made part of it--of which officers Mr. Wickham was sure to be one; and
---------------
from what she saw, to be very seriously in love, their preference
---------------
openly. Seriously, I would have you be on your guard. Do not involve
---------------
* "Yes, and I hope to engage you to be serious likewise.
---------------
* "Well, then, you need not be under any alarm. I will take care of
---------------
myself, and of Mr. Wickham too. He shall not be in love with me, if I
---------------
me--I believe it will be better that he should not. I see the imprudence
---------------
me the greatest honour, and I should be miserable to forfeit it. My
---------------
should be very sorry to be the means of making any of you unhappy; but
---------------
engagements with each other, how can I promise to be wiser than so many
---------------
would be wisdom to resist? All that I can promise you, therefore, is not
---------------
to be in a hurry. I will not be in a hurry to believe myself his first
---------------
object. When I am in company with him, I will not be wishing. In short,
---------------
* "Perhaps it will be as well if you discourage his coming here so very
---------------
true, it will be wise in me to refrain from that. But do not imagine
---------------
honour, I will try to do what I think to be the wisest; and now I hope
---------------
she "wished they might be happy." Thursday was to be the wedding day,
---------------
hope you will consent to be of the party. Indeed, Eliza, you will be as
---------------
it should be equally unreserved was impossible. Elizabeth could never
---------------
would be in her power to say something of the Bingleys.
---------------
* "My dearest Lizzy will, I am sure, be incapable of triumphing in her
---------------
wishing to be intimate with me; but if the same circumstances were to
---------------
happen again, I am sure I should be deceived again. Caroline did not
---------------
this anxiety to be quite needless, yet if she feels it, it will easily
---------------
Maria. I am sure you will be very comfortable there.--Yours, etc.
---------------
considered that Jane would no longer be duped, by the sister at least.
---------------
Nothing, on the contrary, could be more natural; and while able to
---------------
think her a very good sort of girl. There can be no love in all this. My
---------------
watchfulness has been effectual; and though I certainly should be a more
---------------
Importance may sometimes be purchased too dearly. Kitty and Lydia take
---------------
uncompanionable sisters, home could not be faultless, a little change
---------------
first to listen and to pity, the first to be admired; and in his manner
---------------
whether married or single, he must always be her model of the amiable
---------------
that could be worth hearing, and were listened to with about as much
---------------
as to be in Gracechurch Street by noon. As they drove to Mr. Gardiner's
---------------
should be sorry to think our friend mercenary.
---------------
because it would be imprudent; and now, because he is trying to get
---------------
affections because I had no money, what occasion could there be for
---------------
mercenary, and she shall be foolish.
---------------
* "No, Lizzy, that is what I do not choose. I should be sorry, you know,
---------------
we shall spend! And when we do return, it shall not be like other
---------------
Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our
---------------
first effusions be less insupportable than those of the generality of
---------------
the country or kingdom could boast, none were to be compared with the
---------------
Charlotte's evident enjoyment of it, Elizabeth supposed he must be often
---------------
doubt not but you will be honoured with some portion of her notice
---------------
there is such a sight to be seen! I will not tell you what it is. Make
---------------
creature. Who would have thought that she could be so thin and small?"
---------------
* At length there was nothing more to be said; the ladies drove on, and
---------------
of doing it should be given so soon, was such an instance of Lady
---------------
objected to be kept waiting for her dinner. Such formidable accounts of
---------------
Elizabeth saw much to be pleased with, though she could not be in such
---------------
believed Lady Catherine to be exactly what he represented.
---------------
them were likely to be married, whether they were handsome, where they
---------------
* "Oh! then--some time or other we shall be happy to hear you. Our
---------------
one. I always say that nothing is to be done in education without steady
---------------
must be very young?"
---------------
much in company. But really, ma'am, I think it would be very hard upon
---------------
at the first. And to be kept back on such a motive! I think it would
---------------
not be very likely to promote sisterly affection or delicacy of mind.
---------------
and Elizabeth suspected herself to be the first creature who had ever
---------------
* "You cannot be more than twenty, I am sure, therefore you need not
---------------
and till Elizabeth recollected that there might be other family livings
---------------
to be disposed of, she could not understand the sacrifice of so many
---------------
she might be amused in seeing how hopeless Miss Bingley's designs on him
---------------
reserve, to Mrs. Collins, and whatever might be his feelings toward her
---------------
house, they could not be necessary; and it was not till Easter-day,
---------------
* "So much the better. It cannot be done too much; and when I next write
---------------
tell young ladies that no excellence in music is to be acquired without
---------------
Jenkinson's room. She would be in nobody's way, you know, in that part
---------------
me? I will not be alarmed though your sister does play so well. There
---------------
is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the
---------------
* "True; and nobody can ever be introduced in a ball-room. Well, Colonel
---------------
have always supposed it to be my own fault--because I will not take the
---------------
to be within.
---------------
* "If he means to be but little at Netherfield, it would be better for
---------------
* "I should not be surprised," said Darcy, "if he were to give it up as
---------------
* "Mr. Collins appears to be very fortunate in his choice of a wife.
---------------
* "It must be very agreeable for her to be settled within so easy a
---------------
understood; he must be supposing her to be thinking of Jane and
---------------
"I do not mean to say that a woman may not be settled too near her
---------------
family. The far and the near must be relative, and depend on many
---------------
* "What can be the meaning of this?" said Charlotte, as soon as he was
---------------
gone. "My dear, Eliza, he must be in love with you, or he would never
---------------
even to Charlotte's wishes, to be the case; and after various
---------------
always be within doors; and in the nearness of the Parsonage, or the
---------------
to understand. It could not be for society, as he frequently sat there
---------------
vanish, if she could suppose him to be in her power.
---------------
expect that whenever she came into Kent again she would be staying
---------------
feelingly. A younger son, you know, must be inured to self-denial and
---------------
"You need not be frightened. I never heard any harm of her; and I dare
---------------
"It is a circumstance which Darcy could not wish to be generally known,
---------------
because if it were to get round to the lady's family, it would be an
---------------
particulars, and I only suspected it to be Bingley from believing
---------------
cousin's conduct does not suit my feelings. Why was he to be the judge?"
---------------
determine and direct in what manner his friend was to be happy.
---------------
particulars, it is not fair to condemn him. It is not to be supposed
---------------
of all that she had heard. It was not to be supposed that any other
---------------
people could be meant than those with whom she was connected. There
---------------
* "To Jane herself," she exclaimed, "there could be no possibility of
---------------
could anything be urged against my father, who, though with some
---------------
herself be with Jane again, and enabled to contribute to the recovery of
---------------
mean to be unhappy about him.
---------------
those of the heart to be detailed; and he was not more eloquent on the
---------------
* In spite of her deeply-rooted dislike, she could not be insensible to
---------------
expressing his hope that it would now be rewarded by her acceptance of
---------------
unequally they may be returned. It is natural that obligation should
---------------
I might, perhaps, wish to be informed why, with so little endeavour at
---------------
last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry.
---------------
feelings, and have now only to be ashamed of what my own have been.
---------------
in a voice which proved it to be Mr. Darcy, she moved again towards the
---------------
which, for the happiness of both, cannot be too soon forgotten; and the
---------------
should have been spared, had not my character required it to be written
---------------
its exertion, would be a depravity, to which the separation of two young
---------------
persons, whose affection could be the growth of only a few weeks, could
---------------
to be in the future secured, when the following account of my actions
---------------
may be offensive to yours, I can only say that I am sorry. The necessity
---------------
must be obeyed, and further apology would be absurd.
---------------
probable. If it be so, if I have been misled by such error to inflict
---------------
her to be indifferent because I wished it; I believed it on impartial
---------------
connection could not be so great an evil to my friend as to me. But
---------------
me. These causes must be stated, though briefly. The situation of your
---------------
* "The part which I acted is now to be explained. His sisters' uneasiness
---------------
soon discovered, and, alike sensible that no time was to be lost in
---------------
you only can tell. But whatever may be the sentiments which Mr. Wickham
---------------
valuable family living might be his as soon as it became vacant. There
---------------
could not be benefited. He had some intention, he added, of studying
---------------
law, and I must be aware that the interest of one thousand pounds would
---------------
him to be sincere; but, at any rate, was perfectly ready to accede to
---------------
his proposal. I knew that Mr. Wickham ought not to be a clergyman; the
---------------
in the church, were it possible that he could ever be in a situation to
---------------
question--of which he trusted there could be little doubt, as he was
---------------
to consent to an elopement. She was then but fifteen, which must be her
---------------
had imposed on you; but his success is not perhaps to be wondered
---------------
detection could not be in your power, and suspicion certainly not in
---------------
should make my assertions valueless, you cannot be prevented by
---------------
its contents. But such as they were, it may well be supposed how eagerly
---------------
Her feelings as she read were scarcely to be defined. With amazement did
---------------
she first understand that he believed any apology to be in his power;
---------------
instantly resolved to be false; and his account of the real, the worst
---------------
to discredit it entirely, repeatedly exclaiming, "This must be false!
---------------
This cannot be! This must be the grossest falsehood!"--and when she had
---------------
that betrayed him to be unprincipled or unjust--anything that spoke him
---------------
give in the other? He declared himself to be totally unsuspicious of her
---------------
relations, and reflected how materially the credit of both must be hurt
---------------
till she could be found. Elizabeth could but just affect concern
---------------
good health, and in as tolerable spirits as could be expected, after the
---------------
attached to these young men, and know them to be so much attached to
---------------
you may stay a little longer. Mrs. Collins will be very glad of your
---------------
Elizabeth, "but it is not in my power to accept it. I must be in town
---------------
can be no occasion for your going so soon. Mrs. Bennet could certainly
---------------
another month complete, it will be in my power to take one of you as
---------------
Dawson does not object to the barouche-box, there will be very good room
---------------
for one of you--and indeed, if the weather should happen to be cool, I
---------------
the world to that sort of thing. Young women should always be properly
---------------
which Elizabeth believed to be lucky for her; or, with a mind so
---------------
what chance could there be of improvement? Catherine, weak-spirited,
---------------
Meryton was within a walk of Longbourn, they would be going there
---------------
character, it may be easily believed that the happy spirits which had
---------------
as well to be silent. Only let me assure you, my dear Miss Elizabeth,
---------------
placed within, and it was pronounced to be ready. After an affectionate
---------------
* Elizabeth made no objection; the door was then allowed to be shut, and
---------------
Longbourn there would be leisure enough for observation.
---------------
think it will be very tolerable. Besides, it will not much signify what
---------------
* "They are going to be encamped near Brighton; and I do so want papa to
---------------
take us all there for the summer! It would be such a delicious scheme;
---------------
"Yes," thought Elizabeth, "that would be a delightful scheme indeed,
---------------
let us be quite comfortable and snug, and talk and laugh all the way
---------------
before you came back. Jane will be quite an old maid soon, I declare.
---------------
She is almost three-and-twenty! Lord, how ashamed I should be of not
---------------
how I should like to be married before any of you; and then I would
---------------
To this Mary very gravely replied, "Far be it from me, my dear sister,
---------------
to depreciate such pleasures! They would doubtless be congenial with the
---------------
opposed the scheme. It should not be said that the Miss Bennets could
---------------
not be at home half a day before they were in pursuit of the officers.
---------------
there could be nothing more to plague her on his account.
---------------
no longer be overcome; and at length, resolving to suppress every
---------------
* "This will not do," said Elizabeth; "you never will be able to make both
---------------
of them good for anything. Take your choice, but you must be satisfied
---------------
* It was some time, however, before a smile could be extorted from Jane.
---------------
* "And yet I meant to be uncommonly clever in taking so decided a dislike
---------------
opening for wit, to have a dislike of that kind. One may be continually
---------------
abusive without saying anything just; but one cannot always be laughing
---------------
is one point on which I want your advice. I want to be told whether I
---------------
* Miss Bennet paused a little, and then replied, "Surely there can be no
---------------
"That it ought not to be attempted. Mr. Darcy has not authorised me
---------------
relative to his sister was meant to be kept as much as possible to
---------------
is so violent, that it would be the death of half the good people in
---------------
to it. Wickham will soon be gone; and therefore it will not signify to
---------------
anyone here what he really is. Some time hence it will be all found out,
---------------
improbable event should ever take place, I shall merely be able to
---------------
liberty of communication cannot be mine till it has lost all its value!"
---------------
die of a broken heart; and then he will be sorry for what he has done.
---------------
take care not to outrun their income. They will never be distressed
---------------
often talk of it between themselves. Well, if they can be easy with an
---------------
often exclaim in the bitterness of woe. "How can you be smiling so,
---------------
Longbourn House. Elizabeth tried to be diverted by them; but all sense
---------------
to be described. Wholly inattentive to her sister's feelings, Lydia
---------------
right to be asked as she has, and more too, for I am two years older.
---------------
"Lydia will never be easy until she has exposed herself in some public
---------------
some of your lovers? Poor little Lizzy! But do not be cast down. Such
---------------
squeamish youths as cannot bear to be connected with a little absurdity
---------------
importance, our respectability in the world must be affected by the
---------------
of teaching her that her present pursuits are not to be the business of
---------------
her life, she will soon be beyond the reach of amendment. Her character
---------------
will be fixed, and she will, at sixteen, be the most determined flirt
---------------
suppose it possible that they will not be censured and despised wherever
---------------
they are known, and that their sisters will not be often involved in the
---------------
you must be respected and valued; and you will not appear to less
---------------
keep her out of any real mischief; and she is luckily too poor to be an
---------------
object of prey to anybody. At Brighton she will be of less importance
---------------
* With this answer Elizabeth was forced to be content; but her own opinion
---------------
cause, his attentions had been withdrawn, her vanity would be gratified,
---------------
may be of service, if not to himself, to many others, for it must only
---------------
there was every reason to believe would be well attended to; and in
---------------
greater evil might be apprehended, was likely to be hardened in all
---------------
some other point on which her wishes and hopes might be fixed, and by
---------------
Were the whole arrangement complete, my disappointment would be certain.
---------------
never be successful; and general disappointment is only warded off by
---------------
less to be learnt--for her letters to Kitty, though rather longer, were
---------------
much too full of lines under the words to be made public.
---------------
June, Kitty was so much recovered as to be able to enter Meryton without
---------------
the following Christmas she might be so tolerably reasonable as not to
---------------
arrangement at the War Office, another regiment should be quartered in
---------------
curtailed its extent. Mr. Gardiner would be prevented by business from
---------------
setting out till a fortnight later in July, and must be in London again
---------------
county there was enough to be seen to occupy the chief of their three
---------------
was her business to be satisfied--and certainly her temper to be happy;
---------------
younger boys, were to be left under the particular care of their
---------------
occurred. It would be dreadful! She blushed at the very idea, and
---------------
thought it would be better to speak openly to her aunt than to run such
---------------
that it could be the last resource, if her private inquiries to the
---------------
to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!
---------------
"There are very few people of whom so much can be said. You are lucky in
---------------
* Elizabeth almost stared at her. "Can this be Mr. Darcy?" thought she.
---------------
* "Yes, ma'am, that he was indeed; and his son will be just like him--just
---------------
* "Perhaps we might be deceived.
---------------
can give his sister any pleasure is sure to be done in a moment. There
---------------
all that remained to be shown. In the former were many good paintings;
---------------
the only face whose features would be known to her. At last it arrested
---------------
good or evil must be done by him! Every idea that had been brought
---------------
of going round the whole park, but feared it might be beyond a walk.
---------------
Pemberley from her might be mischievously construed. Her colour changed,
---------------
revolted in his offer to herself. "What will be his surprise," thought
---------------
conversation with Mr. Gardiner. Elizabeth could not but be pleased,
---------------
must be all for herself. Her astonishment, however, was extreme, and
---------------
it proceed? It cannot be for me--it cannot be for my sake that his
---------------
water-plant, there chanced to be a little alteration. It originated
---------------
you would certainly not be here till to-morrow; and indeed, before we
---------------
pause, "who more particularly wishes to be known to you. Will you allow
---------------
must be the work of her brother, and, without looking farther, it was
---------------
there seemed to be an embargo on every subject. At last she recollected
---------------
pronounced him to be infinitely superior to anything they had expected.
---------------
* "There is something a little stately in him, to be sure," replied her
---------------
* "To be sure, Lizzy," said her aunt, "he is not so handsome as Wickham;
---------------
* "But perhaps he may be a little whimsical in his civilities," replied
---------------
not give one an unfavourable idea of his heart. But, to be sure, the
---------------
her authority, but stating it to be such as might be relied on.
---------------
all, of his wishing her to be acquainted with his sister.
---------------
resolved not to be out of sight of the inn the whole of that morning.
---------------
was ready, Georgiana was eager, and Darcy determined, to be pleased.
---------------
though this might be imaginary, she could not be deceived as to his
---------------
little. Eager to be alone, and fearful of inquiries or hints from her
---------------
not be untouched by his politeness; and had they drawn his character
---------------
it would certainly be imputed by the inhabitants of a small market-town
---------------
that could be so called. The respect created by the conviction of his
---------------
time ceased to be repugnant to her feeling; and it was now heightened
---------------
there was a motive within her of goodwill which could not be overlooked.
---------------
love, it must be attributed; and as such its impression on her was of a
---------------
sort to be encouraged, as by no means unpleasing, though it could not be
---------------
late breakfast, ought to be imitated, though it could not be equalled,
---------------
it would be highly expedient to wait on her at Pemberley the following
---------------
appearance at Pemberley must be to her, and was curious to know with how
---------------
much civility on that lady's side the acquaintance would now be renewed.
---------------
of discourse proved her to be more truly well-bred than either of the
---------------
inconvenient distance; but she was not sorry to be spared the necessity
---------------
feared that the master of the house might be amongst them; and whether
---------------
resolved to be perfectly easy and unembarrassed; a resolution the more
---------------
necessary to be made, but perhaps not the more easily kept, because she
---------------
They must be a great loss to your family.
---------------
Wickham, Georgiana also recovered in time, though not enough to be able
---------------
themselves. The one missent must first be attended to; it had been
---------------
their intention. I must conclude, for I cannot be long from my poor
---------------
mother. I am afraid you will not be able to make it out, but I hardly
---------------
wish this may be more intelligible, but though not confined for time, my
---------------
and it cannot be delayed. Imprudent as the marriage between Mr. Wickham
---------------
and our poor Lydia would be, we are now anxious to be assured it has
---------------
it more eligible for them to be married privately in town than to pursue
---------------
exert herself, it would be better; but this is not to be expected. And
---------------
uncle's advice and assistance would be everything in the world; he will
---------------
Mr. Gardiner this moment, on business that cannot be delayed; I have not
---------------
little would be gained by her attempting to pursue them. Calling back
---------------
with such dreadful news. It cannot be concealed from anyone. My younger
---------------
immediate assistance; and we shall be off, I hope, in half-an-hour. But
---------------
nothing can be done--I know very well that nothing can be done. How is
---------------
such a man to be worked on? How are they even to be discovered? I have
---------------
him, as now, when all love must be vain.
---------------
could be either said or done on my part that might offer consolation to
---------------
* "Oh, yes. Be so kind as to apologise for us to Miss Darcy. Say that
---------------
long as it is possible, I know it cannot be long.
---------------
change of sentiment will be neither improbable nor faulty. But if
---------------
exchanged, nothing can be said in her defence, except that she had given
---------------
less interesting mode of attachment. Be that as it may, she saw him
---------------
Lydia to be deliberately engaging in an elopement without the intention
---------------
She was wild to be at home--to hear, to see, to be upon the spot to
---------------
could be done for Lydia, her uncle's interference seemed of the utmost
---------------
favourite with them, Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner could not but be deeply
---------------
be off as soon as possible. "But what is to be done about Pemberley?"
---------------
"Yes; and I told him we should not be able to keep our engagement.
---------------
to be idle, she would have remained certain that all employment was
---------------
remained to be done but to go; and Elizabeth, after all the misery of
---------------
would not step forward? Could he expect to be noticed again by the
---------------
* "Upon my word," said Mrs. Gardiner, "I begin to be of your uncle's
---------------
interest, for him to be guilty of. I cannot think so very ill of
---------------
neglect I can believe him capable. If, indeed, it should be so! But I
---------------
a presumption! And, besides, no traces of them were to be found on the
---------------
* "Well, then--supposing them to be in London. They may be there, though
---------------
not likely that money should be very abundant on either side; and it
---------------
might strike them that they could be more economically, though less
---------------
marriage be private? Oh, no, no--this is not likely. His most particular
---------------
* "But does Lydia know nothing of this? can she be ignorant of what you
---------------
it apparently be to any one, that the good opinion which all the
---------------
neighbourhood had of him should then be overthrown? And even when it was
---------------
side; and had anything of the kind been perceptible, you must be aware
---------------
that ours is not a family on which it could be thrown away. When first
---------------
It may be easily believed, that however little of novelty could be added
---------------
everything will be well.
---------------
conversation together, received them exactly as might be expected; with
---------------
errors of her daughter must principally be owing.
---------------
wherever he meets him and then he will be killed, and what is to become
---------------
that he meant to be in London the very next day, and would assist Mr.
---------------
together as to what is to be done.
---------------
"This is a most unfortunate affair, and will probably be much talked of.
---------------
"Unhappy as the event must be for Lydia, we may draw from it this useful
---------------
brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in
---------------
* In the afternoon, the two elder Miss Bennets were able to be for
---------------
Bennet could not assert to be wholly impossible, the former continued
---------------
did. He believed him to be imprudent and extravagant. And since this sad
---------------
but I hope this may be false.
---------------
love, and he is an angel. I should never be happy without him, so think
---------------
it no harm to be off.(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice )
---------------
finished it. "What a letter is this, to be written at such a moment!
---------------
"I do not know. I hope there was. But to be guarded at such a time is
---------------
of repose should not be broken in on. My aunt Phillips came to Longbourn
---------------
they should be of use to us.
---------------
insufferable. Let them triumph over us at a distance, and be satisfied.
---------------
be made out from them. His principal object must be to discover the
---------------
determined to make inquiries there, and hoped it might not be impossible
---------------
other designs that he had formed; but he was in such a hurry to be gone,
---------------
send; but even of that they would have been glad to be certain. Mr.
---------------
days longer, as the former thought her presence might be serviceable
---------------
before, had been almost an angel of light. He was declared to be in debt
---------------
whether Wickham has any relations or connections who would be likely to
---------------
clue as that, it might be of essential consequence. At present we have
---------------
his companions in the ----shire might be able to give more information;
---------------
whatever of good or bad was to be told would be communicated, and every
---------------
Hertfordshire. Be assured, my dear sir, that Mrs. Collins and myself
---------------
your present distress, which must be of the bitterest kind, because
---------------
may comfort you, under a circumstance that must be of all others the
---------------
that her own disposition must be naturally bad, or she could not be
---------------
you are grievously to be pitied; in which opinion I am not only joined
---------------
this false step in one daughter will be injurious to the fortunes of
---------------
who could be pointed out as likely to give any news of him. And in the
---------------
thousand pounds would be necessary to clear his expenses at Brighton.
---------------
leave it to him to do whatever occasion might suggest to be advisable
---------------
As Mrs. Gardiner began to wish to be at home, it was settled that she
---------------
* "You must not be too severe upon yourself," replied Elizabeth.
---------------
* "Do you suppose them to be in London?"
---------------
"Yes; where else can they be so well concealed?"
---------------
will probably be of some duration.
---------------
for fifty pounds! No, Kitty, I have at last learnt to be cautious, and
---------------
"What is there of good to be expected?" said he, taking the letter from
---------------
not be long before they are. All that is required of you is, to assure
---------------
express, that no time may be lost in bringing me your answer. You
---------------
will be some little money, even when all his debts are discharged, to
---------------
will be the case, you send me full powers to act in your name throughout
---------------
Haggerston for preparing a proper settlement. There will not be the
---------------
fast as you can, and be careful to write explicitly. We have judged it
---------------
best that my niece should be married from this house, of which I hope
---------------
* "No; but it must be done soon.
---------------
* "I dislike it very much," he replied; "but it must be done.
---------------
"Yes, yes, they must marry. There is nothing else to be done. But there
---------------
before. His debts to be discharged, and something still to remain! Oh!
---------------
it must be my uncle's doings! Generous, good man, I am afraid he has
---------------
less than ten thousand pounds. I should be sorry to think so ill of him,
---------------
* "And they are really to be married!" cried Elizabeth, as soon as they
---------------
she will never deserve to be happy! What a meeting for her, when she
---------------
Jane: "I hope and trust they will yet be happy. His consenting to
---------------
would be married was enough. She was disturbed by no fear for her
---------------
be married! I shall see her again! She will be married at sixteen!
---------------
Lydia! How merry we shall be together when we meet!"
---------------
afterwards; but the things should be ordered immediately.
---------------
father was at leisure to be consulted. One day's delay, she observed,
---------------
would be of small importance; and her mother was too happy to be quite
---------------
heard the good news? Miss Lydia is going to be married; and you shall
---------------
* Poor Lydia's situation must, at best, be bad enough; but that it was
---------------
no worse, she had need to be thankful. She felt it so; and though, in
---------------
of honour or credit could now be purchased for her. The satisfaction of
---------------
should be forwarded at the sole expense of his brother-in-law, and he
---------------
* When first Mr. Bennet had married, economy was held to be perfectly
---------------
in cutting off the entail, as soon as he should be of age, and the widow
---------------
and younger children would by that means be provided for. Five daughters
---------------
too late to be saving. Mrs. Bennet had no turn for economy, and her
---------------
the children. But in what proportions it should be divided amongst the
---------------
regard to Lydia, at least, which was now to be settled, and Mr. Bennet
---------------
that, could Wickham be prevailed on to marry his daughter, it would
---------------
arrangement. He would scarcely be ten pounds a year the loser by the
---------------
hundred that was to be paid them; for, what with her board and pocket
---------------
* That it would be done with such trifling exertion on his side, too, was
---------------
philosophy. To be sure, it would have been more for the advantage
---------------
farmhouse. But there was much to be talked of in marrying her; and the
---------------
it. That his anger could be carried to such a point of inconceivable
---------------
concluded on the most honourable terms, it was not to be supposed that
---------------
objection, would now be added an alliance and relationship of the
---------------
longer hope to be benefited by it. She wanted to hear of him, when there
---------------
there must be a triumph.
---------------
precluding the possibility of the other, was soon to be formed in their
---------------
* How Wickham and Lydia were to be supported in tolerable independence,
---------------
that the subject might never be mentioned to him again. The principal
---------------
have a character to preserve, they will both be more prudent. I have
---------------
and all will be completed in a week. They will then join his regiment,
---------------
leaves the South. She is well, and begs to be dutifully remembered to
---------------
pity that Lydia should be taken from a regiment where she was acquainted
---------------
* "She is so fond of Mrs. Forster," said she, "it will be quite shocking
---------------
likes very much. The officers may not be so pleasant in General ----'s
---------------
* His daughter's request, for such it might be considered, of being
---------------
consequence, that she should be noticed on her marriage by her parents,
---------------
mother had the satisfaction of knowing that she would be able to show
---------------
thought it would be very good fun if I was.
---------------
which she chose to be insensible, gaily continued, "Oh! mamma, do the
---------------
* It was not to be supposed that time would give Lydia that embarrassment
---------------
at all like your going such a way off. Must it be so?"
---------------
shall be at Newcastle all the winter, and I dare say there will be some
---------------
* No one but Mrs. Bennet regretted that their stay would be so short; and
---------------
present observation to be satisfied, from the reason of things, that
---------------
occasion; no one was to be put in competition with him. He did every
---------------
"No really," replied Elizabeth; "I think there cannot be too little said
---------------
that parish. And it was settled that we should all be there by eleven
---------------
to know whether he would be married in his blue coat.
---------------
fortnight. Not one party, or scheme, or anything. To be sure London was
---------------
were beyond the hour, we could not be married all day. But, luckily, he
---------------
wedding need not be put off, for Mr. Darcy might have done as well.
---------------
them so faithfully! What will Wickham say? It was to be such a secret!"
---------------
"If it was to be secret," said Jane, "say not another word on the
---------------
all, and then Wickham would be angry.
---------------
to think necessary; and then I must endeavour to be satisfied with
---------------
manner, I shall certainly be reduced to tricks and stratagems to find it
---------------
satisfaction, she had rather be without a confidante.
---------------
inquiries to be necessary on your side. If you do not choose to
---------------
innocent and ignorant, I must be more explicit.
---------------
corruption, for she really did know where her friend was to be found.
---------------
situation, and return to her friends as soon as they could be prevailed
---------------
of leaving Wickham. She was sure they should be married some time or
---------------
Mr. Bennet was not imagined to be very rich, he would have been able
---------------
to be proof against the temptation of immediate relief.
---------------
* "They met several times, for there was much to be discussed. Wickham of
---------------
your father to be a person whom he could so properly consult as your
---------------
Nothing was to be done that he did not do himself; though I am sure (and
---------------
I do not speak it to be thanked, therefore say nothing about it), your
---------------
was forced to yield, and instead of being allowed to be of use to his
---------------
people. His debts are to be paid, amounting, I believe, to considerably
---------------
this was to be done by him alone, was such as I have given above. It
---------------
can be answerable for the event. But in spite of all this fine talking,
---------------
were still staying at Pemberley; but it was agreed that he should be in
---------------
town again on Wednesday or Thursday. Will you be very angry with me, my
---------------
punish me so far as to exclude me from P. I shall never be quite happy
---------------
pair of ponies, would be the very thing.
---------------
great to be probable, and at the same time dreaded to be just, from the
---------------
pain of obligation, were proved beyond their greatest extent to be true!
---------------
to be sure, done much. She was ashamed to think how much. But he had
---------------
his endeavours in a cause where her peace of mind must be materially
---------------
that the interruption must be unwelcome.
---------------
* "I should be sorry indeed, if it were. We were always good friends; and
---------------
* "I almost envy you the pleasure, and yet I believe it would be too much
---------------
several times. I wonder what he can be doing there.
---------------
Elizabeth. "It must be something particular, to take him there at this
---------------
repine;--but, to be sure, it would have been such a thing for me! The
---------------
so palatable to you as it seems to be at present; that you actually
---------------
us quarrel about the past. In future, I hope we shall be always of one
---------------
but only because her husband's regiment happens to be so far off. If
---------------
article of news which then began to be in circulation. The housekeeper
---------------
Wednesday, and she has got three couple of ducks just fit to be killed.
---------------
I should be looked at. I do assure you that the news does not affect
---------------
* In spite of what her sister declared, and really believed to be her
---------------
nothing, and I will not be sent on a fool's errand again.
---------------
would be from all the neighbouring gentlemen, on his returning to
---------------
* "Well, all I know is, that it will be abominably rude if you do not wait
---------------
make thirteen with ourselves, so there will be just room at table for
---------------
"I begin to be sorry that he comes at all," said Jane to her sister. "It
---------------
would be nothing; I could see him with perfect indifference, but I can
---------------
and fretfulness on her side might be as long as it could. She counted
---------------
the days that must intervene before their invitation could be sent;
---------------
* "La!" replied Kitty, "it looks just like that man that used to be with
---------------
Mr. Bingley's will always be welcome here, to be sure; but else I must
---------------
To Jane, he could be only a man whose proposals she had refused,
---------------
wishes must still be unshaken. But she would not be secure.
---------------
* "Let me first see how he behaves," said she; "it will then be early
---------------
* She sat intently at work, striving to be composed, and without daring to
---------------
presence be what he was before her uncle and aunt. It was a painful, but
---------------
* "Could I expect it to be otherwise!" said she. "Yet why did he come?"
---------------
* "I began to be afraid you would never come back again. People did say
---------------
* "It is a delightful thing, to be sure, to have a daughter well married,"
---------------
* Elizabeth, who knew this to be levelled at Mr. Darcy, was in such
---------------
Bennet's manor. I am sure he will be vastly happy to oblige you, and
---------------
but every five minutes seemed to be giving her more of his attention. He
---------------
difference should be perceived in her at all, and was really persuaded
---------------
not think anything less than two courses could be good enough for a man
---------------
* "Why, if he came only to be silent, grave, and indifferent," said she,
---------------
* "He could be still amiable, still pleasing, to my uncle and aunt, when
---------------
easy. I know my own strength, and I shall never be embarrassed again by
---------------
his coming. I am glad he dines here on Tuesday. It will then be publicly
---------------
* "My dear Lizzy, you cannot think me so weak, as to be in danger now?"
---------------
Bingley had received his sanction to be happy, had she not seen his eyes
---------------
own, would be speedily secured. Though she dared not depend upon the
---------------
and she would, at times, have given anything to be privileged to tell
---------------
"A man who has once been refused! How could I ever be foolish enough to
---------------
all rose, and Elizabeth was then hoping to be soon joined by him,
---------------
Bingley's behaviour to Jane, to be convinced that she would get him at
---------------
* "How hard it is in some cases to be believed!"
---------------
* "Next time you call," said she, "I hope we shall be more lucky.
---------------
* He should be particularly happy at any time, etc. etc.; and if she would
---------------
* "We will be down as soon as we can," said Jane; "but I dare say Kitty is
---------------
* "Oh! hang Kitty! what has she to do with it? Come be quick, be quick!
---------------
But when her mother was gone, Jane would not be prevailed on to go down
---------------
the happy belief that all must speedily be concluded, unless Mr. Darcy
---------------
* "With my mother up stairs. She will be down in a moment, I dare say.
---------------
expectations of felicity to be rationally founded, because they had for
---------------
"Jane, I congratulate you. You will be a very happy woman.
---------------
thinking you will be so happily settled. I have not a doubt of your
---------------
each of you so complying, that nothing will ever be resolved on; so
---------------
would be. I always said it must be so, at last. I was sure you could not
---------------
which she might in future be able to dispense.
---------------
supper; unless when some barbarous neighbour, who could not be enough
---------------
learn to be contented, and we shall be on good terms again; though we
---------------
can never be what we once were to each other.
---------------
"He made a little mistake to be sure; but it is to the credit of his
---------------
"If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as
---------------
* The situation of affairs in the Longbourn family could not be long a
---------------
* The Bennets were speedily pronounced to be the luckiest family in the
---------------
they had been generally proved to be marked out for misfortune.
---------------
* They were of course all intending to be surprised; but their
---------------
* "This must be a most inconvenient sitting room for the evening, in
---------------
"Miss Bennet, there seemed to be a prettyish kind of a little wilderness
---------------
on one side of your lawn. I should be glad to take a turn in it, if you
---------------
different walks. I think she will be pleased with the hermitage.
---------------
drawing-room, and pronouncing them, after a short survey, to be decent
---------------
"You can be at no loss, Miss Bennet, to understand the reason of my
---------------
know, that I am not to be trifled with. But however insincere you may
---------------
you, that Miss Elizabeth Bennet, would, in all likelihood, be soon
---------------
know it must be a scandalous falsehood, though I would not injure him
---------------
* "If you believed it impossible to be true," said Elizabeth, colouring
---------------
coolly, "will be rather a confirmation of it; if, indeed, such a report
---------------
* "If! Do you then pretend to be ignorant of it? Has it not been
---------------
* "This is not to be borne. Miss Bennet, I insist on being satisfied. Has
---------------
"Your ladyship has declared it to be impossible.
---------------
* "It ought to be so; it must be so, while he retains the use of his
---------------
* "If I have, I shall be the last person to confess it.
---------------
ever induce me to be explicit.
---------------
* "Let me be rightly understood. This match, to which you have the
---------------
be accomplished in their marriage, to be prevented by a young woman of
---------------
Miss Bennet, interest; for do not expect to be noticed by his family or
---------------
Your alliance will be a disgrace; your name will never even be mentioned
---------------
I be dissuaded from it. I have not been used to submit to any person's
---------------
* "I will not be interrupted. Hear me in silence. My daughter and my
---------------
or fortune. Is this to be endured! But it must not, shall not be. If you
---------------
not object to them, they can be nothing to you.
---------------
* "And I certainly never shall give it. I am not to be intimidated into
---------------
marriage at all more probable? Supposing him to be attached to me, would
---------------
you think I can be worked on by such persuasions as these. How far your
---------------
therefore, to be importuned no farther on the subject.
---------------
such a girl to be my nephew's sister? Is her husband, is the son of his
---------------
late father's steward, to be his brother? Heaven and earth!--of what are
---------------
you thinking? Are the shades of Pemberley to be thus polluted?"
---------------
would be violated by my marriage with Mr. Darcy. And with regard to the
---------------
ambition will ever be gratified. I came to try you. I hoped to find you
---------------
Elizabeth into, could not be easily overcome; nor could she, for many
---------------
Darcy. It was a rational scheme, to be sure! but from what the report
---------------
settle every doubt, and determine him at once to be as happy as dignity
---------------
might be from Lady Catherine; and she anticipated with dismay all the
---------------
and she was undetermined whether most to be pleased that he explained
---------------
her noble admirer may be aware of what they are about, and not run
---------------
living together before the marriage took place should be so generally
---------------
names to be mentioned in your hearing.' That is his notion of Christian
---------------
look as if you did not enjoy it. You are not going to be missish,
---------------
I hope, and pretend to be affronted at an idle report. For what do we
---------------
in momentary dread, Bingley, who wanted to be alone with Jane, proposed
---------------
desperate resolution; and perhaps he might be doing the same.
---------------
moment for her resolution to be executed, and, while her courage was
---------------
relief to my own feelings, care not how much I may be wounding yours. I
---------------
was so little to be trusted.
---------------
* "If you will thank me," he replied, "let it be for yourself alone.
---------------
warmly as a man violently in love can be supposed to do. Had Elizabeth
---------------
to hope before. I knew enough of your disposition to be certain that,
---------------
will be irreproachable; but since then, we have both, I hope, improved
---------------
* "I cannot be so easily reconciled to myself. The recollection of what I
---------------
* "The letter shall certainly be burnt, if you believe it essential to the
---------------
circumstance attending it ought to be forgotten. You must learn some
---------------
retrospections must be so totally void of reproach, that the contentment
---------------
which cannot, which ought not, to be repelled. I have been a selfish
---------------
me to be selfish and overbearing; to care for none beyond my own family
---------------
* "Your surprise could not be greater than mine in being noticed by you.
---------------
each, to be dwelt on farther.
---------------
it was time to be at home.
---------------
herself. She remembered that he had yet to learn to be laughed at,
---------------
of Bingley, which of course was to be inferior only to his own, he
---------------
than felt herself to be so; for, besides the immediate embarrassment,
---------------
there were other evils before her. She anticipated what would be felt
---------------
you shall not deceive me. I know it to be impossible.
---------------
* "You know nothing of the matter. That is all to be forgot. Perhaps I
---------------
* "Good Heaven! can it be really so! Yet now I must believe you," cried
---------------
"There can be no doubt of that. It is settled between us already, that
---------------
we are to be the happiest couple in the world. But are you pleased,
---------------
afraid you will be angry.
---------------
* "My dearest sister, now be serious. I want to talk very seriously. Let
---------------
* Another entreaty that she would be serious, however, produced the
---------------
* "Now I am quite happy," said she, "for you will be as happy as myself.
---------------
husband, there can be only Bingley and yourself more dear to me. But
---------------
our dear Bingley! What can he mean by being so tiresome as to be always
---------------
Lizzy, you must walk out with him again, that he may not be in Bingley's
---------------
was really vexed that her mother should be always giving him such an
---------------
sure it will be too much for Kitty. Won't it, Kitty?" Kitty owned that
---------------
"I am quite sorry, Lizzy, that you should be forced to have that
---------------
would be enough to overcome her abhorrence of the man. But whether she
---------------
was certain that her manner would be equally ill adapted to do credit
---------------
be made unhappy; and that it should be through her means--that she,
---------------
his favourite child, should be distressing him by her choice, should be
---------------
"None at all. We all know him to be a proud, unpleasant sort of man; but
---------------
this would be nothing if you really liked him.
---------------
your disposition, Lizzy. I know that you could be neither happy nor
---------------
say. If this be the case, he deserves you. I could not have parted with
---------------
his love for you, and there will be an end of the matter.
---------------
anything material to be dreaded, and the comfort of ease and familiarity
---------------
* This was enough to prove that her approbation need not be doubted: and
---------------
special licence. You must and shall be married by a special licence. But
---------------
consent, there was still something to be wished for. But the morrow
---------------
to you without rather wishing to give you pain than not. Now be sincere;
---------------
reasonable. To be sure, you knew no actual good of me--but nobody thinks
---------------
I should be so reasonable as to admit it! But I wonder how long you
---------------
* "You need not distress yourself. The moral will be perfectly fair. Lady
---------------
for she loves to be of use. But tell me, what did you come down to
---------------
Netherfield for? Was it merely to ride to Longbourn and be embarrassed?
---------------
ought to be done, and if you will give me a sheet of paper, it shall be
---------------
I have an aunt, too, who must not be longer neglected.
---------------
for not going to the Lakes. How could I be so silly as to wish it! Your
---------------
humour encouraged, yet, whenever she did speak, she must be vulgar.
---------------
the time when they should be removed from society so little pleasing
---------------
thing, was not wholly without hope that Darcy might yet be prevailed on
---------------
Wickham, you must be very happy. It is a great comfort to have you so
---------------
of what might be called economy in her own private expences, she
---------------
their wants, and heedless of the future, must be very insufficient to
---------------
proceeded so far as to talk of giving them a hint to be gone.
---------------
public career of the immortal Pickwick would appear to be involved, is
---------------
appointed members of the same; and that they be requested to forward,
---------------
to the world; it might be celebrated or it might not. (A cry of "It
---------------
that production would be as nothing compared with the pride with which
---------------
'Mr. PICKWICK would not put up to be put down by clamour. He had alluded
---------------
members of that club should be allowed to continue. (Hear, hear.)
---------------
explanation of his honourable friend. He begged it to be at once
---------------
might I be content to gaze on Goswell Street for ever, without one
---------------
might be observed between the tops of his gloves and the cuffs of his
---------------
to be soldiers, sailors, Jews, chalk, shrimps, officers, and dockyard
---------------
'must be very great, and the smell which pervades the streets must be
---------------
Mr. Tupman again expressed an earnest wish to be present at the
---------------
incredible. 'I should be very happy to lend you a change of apparel for
---------------
sank so low as to be scarcely discernible; after a short interval, he
---------------
* The temptation to be present at the ball, and to form his first
---------------
Slammer, of the 97th, to be extinguished in a moment, by a man whom
---------------
were not a thing to be laughed at, but a severe trial to the feelings,
---------------
'Very odd!' said Mr. Winkle; 'I'll be down directly.'
---------------
'You will not be surprised, sir, when I inform you that I have called
---------------
He commissioned me to say, that should this be pleaded as an excuse
---------------
* 'It must be so,' said Mr. Winkle, letting the coat fall from his hands.
---------------
you to a secluded place, where the affair can be conducted without fear
---------------
cool any party but the principal can be in such cases. Mr. Winkle had
---------------
* 'The consequences may be dreadful,' said Mr. Winkle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
friend, will be tried as an accessory before the fact. Shall I involve
---------------
* 'Snodgrass,' he said, stopping suddenly, 'do not let me be balked in
---------------
whether the gentleman, being on the ground, must not be considered, as
---------------
a matter of form, to be the individual who insulted our friend, Doctor
---------------
'Pray be quiet, Payne,' said the doctor's second. 'Why did you not
---------------
'To be sure--to be sure,' said the man with the camp-stool indignantly. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I entreat you to be quiet, Payne,' said the other. 'May I repeat my
---------------
'With great pleasure,' said the little doctor; 'will ten o'clock be too
---------------
'Oh dear, no,' said Mr. Winkle. 'I shall be most happy to introduce you
---------------
* 'You will be sure to come?' said Mr. Snodgrass. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'To be before the footlights,' continued the dismal man, 'is like
---------------
the gaudy throng; to be behind them is to be the people who make that
---------------
Neglected disease and hopeless poverty were as certain to be his
---------------
persevere, and the result may be guessed. He could obtain no engagement,
---------------
"Jem, she must be an evil spirit--a devil! Hush! I know she is. If she
---------------
It would afford us the highest gratification to be enabled to record Mr.
---------------
* 'Do be quiet, Payne,' interposed the lieutenant. 'Will you allow me to
---------------
be to be more select in the choice of your companions. Good-evening,
---------------
our New River Head; and we may be compared to the New River Company. The
---------------
lines. The manoeuvres of half a dozen regiments were to be inspected by
---------------
been erected, the citadel was to be attacked and taken, and a mine was
---------------
to be sprung. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
and was nowhere to be found), rendered their situation upon the whole
---------------
screamed, the troops recovered, and nothing was to be seen on either
---------------
* 'Can anything be finer or more delightful?' he inquired of Mr. Winkle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
hat. A man must not be precipitate, or he runs over it; he must not rush
---------------
keep gently up with the object of pursuit, to be wary and cautious, to
---------------
you? You do look uncommon well, to be sure.'
---------------
am glad to hear you say you are well; very glad I am, to be sure. My
---------------
know each other, let's be comfortable and happy, and see what's
---------------
to sleep again. Be good enough to pinch him, sir--in the leg, if you
---------------
little better, don't you think they would be nice-looking girls--by
---------------
such observers. Well, so she does; it can't be denied; and, certainly,
---------------
fine to last." How well might it be applied to our everyday existence.
---------------
to be able to forget them for ever!'
---------------
'What's to be done?' said Mr. Snodgrass. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
Winkle had rushed upon his fate; there was no resource. 'Let them be at
---------------
assistance can be procured. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
reins were on his back. The results may be guessed. He tore off with the
---------------
various lacerations from the brambles. The next thing to be done was to
---------------
to be pettish; till, feeling Mr. Tupman squeezing her hand under the
---------------
The wall must be crumbled, the stone decayed,
---------------
conception. Heaven forgive me the supposition, if it be an uncharitable
---------------
* 'They were poor--they could not be otherwise when the man pursued such
---------------
kind as they were wont to be of old, but she shunned their greetings
---------------
had not seen her--, and in four-and-twenty hours he was to be separated
---------------
he could reach his place of destination, his mother would be no longer
---------------
that the letter should be addressed to me. The father had positively
---------------
concluded him to be dead, as, indeed, I almost hoped he might be. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
may be attributed the fact, that though several letters were despatched,
---------------
not to be described, through long and weary years of captivity and
---------------
could not be cheerful, and he away. The door opened, and a group of
---------------
would be when he returned. The sad reality struck coldly at his heart,
---------------
they seemed to be starting from their sockets. Edmunds gradually raised
---------------
appear to be more than three parts and a fraction asleep, emerged from
---------------
a foreboding of his approaching death by violence, may be supposed
---------------
which they felt quite certain would be occasioned by the devastating
---------------
* To describe the confusion that ensued would be impossible. To tell
---------------
as difficult to describe in detail, as it would be to depict the gradual
---------------
* 'Don't be frightened,' called out the old host, fearful of alarming his
---------------
* 'Don't be frightened,' said the host. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'Don't be a fool, Rachael,' interposed Mr. Wardle, rather more roughly
---------------
* 'No,' said Mr. Tupman. 'It is nothing. I shall be better presently.' He
---------------
* The arm was examined, the wound dressed, and pronounced to be a very
---------------
which may be safely indulged in, and in which the impotent effects of
---------------
and added: 'Shall we be justified in leaving our wounded friend to the
---------------
* It was therefore settled that Mr. Tupman should be left at home in
---------------
guidance of Mr. Wardle, should proceed to the spot where was to be held
---------------
doors looked as if they should like to be making their way to the same
---------------
make these observations, to be noted down at a more convenient period,
---------------
the day, with which, he had no doubt, they would be greatly delighted. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
invitation may be easily founded. His curiosity was therefore satisfied,
---------------
to be recovered. In vain did the eager Luffey, and the enthusiastic
---------------
here--West Indies--exciting thing--hot work--very.' 'It must be rather a
---------------
'I shall be very happy, I am sure,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'So shall I,'
---------------
not be considered as wishing to detract from the merits of the former
---------------
Diogenes," said he, "I would be Alexander." I can well imagine these
---------------
gentlemen to say, "If I were not Dumkins I would be Luffey; if I were
---------------
not Podder I would be Struggles." (Enthusiasm.) But, gentlemen of
---------------
should be at once and for ever resolved. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'Could such an individual be found--' said the lady. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'But he CAN be found,' said the ardent Mr. Tupman, interposing. 'He
---------------
and Emily's thoughts appeared to be engrossed by some distant
---------------
which they could be supposed likely to have travelled home? or should
---------------
his anecdotes was only to be exceeded by the extent of his politeness.
---------------
such a result was to be attained, all her former horrors returned. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
brother will be furious.'
---------------
'Never!' and, by way of showing that he had no desire to be questioned
---------------
appeared to be struggling with various conflicting emotions for a few
---------------
'Of course--she don't like it--but must be done--avert suspicion--afraid
---------------
mine, and all dissimulation may be unnecessary.'
---------------
told him that his affair would soon be brought to a crisis. So was Mr.
---------------
sufficient importance in this eventful history to be narrated in another
---------------
* 'I won't be held!' cried the old man. 'Mr. Winkle, take your hands off.
---------------
'It will be rather unpleasant going at this rate in the dark, won't it?'
---------------
wrong horses, and the whole process of harnessing had to be gone through
---------------
not to be so easily daunted; and he laid about him with such hearty
---------------
* 'Never mind,' replied his companion, 'it will soon be over. Steady,
---------------
Jingle's voice could be plainly heard, even above the din of the wheels,
---------------
but the plunging of horses, and breaking of glass could be made out, Mr.
---------------
we stand talking here, they'll get their licence, and be married in
---------------
'Can't be helped,' said Wardle, 'we must walk it, Pickwick.'
---------------
should ever be reduced to the lamentable necessity of inventing any,
---------------
about on heaps of straw, we have described as fully as need be the
---------------
* 'Come, don't be a fool, Sam,' said the girl coaxingly, 'the gentleman
---------------
is to be called at half-past eight and the shoe at nine. Who's number
---------------
'Vouldn't be gen-teel to answer, till you'd done talking,' replied Sam
---------------
to be sure. His missus dies, and leaves him four hundred pound. Down
---------------
Monday."--"Did you, though?" said my father.--"To be sure, we did," says
---------------
'Can't--can't we be married before to-morrow morning?' inquired
---------------
'Don't be long,' said the spinster affectionately, as Mr. Jingle stuck
---------------
he wended his way to Doctors' Commons. It will be sufficient for our
---------------
Weller happened to be at that moment engaged in burnishing a pair of
---------------
* 'Oh, wery well, Sir,' replied Sam, 'we shan't be bankrupts, and we
---------------
me--my dear Sir, the very first principle to be observed in these cases,
---------------
cannot be ignorant of the extent of confidence which must be placed in
---------------
professional men. If any authority can be necessary on such a point, my
---------------
'I WON'T be taken away,' murmured the spinster aunt. 'I DON'T wish it.'
---------------
We must be content to suffer some pecuniary loss.'
---------------
as she is, be made miserable for life,' said Wardle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I rather think it can be done,' said the bustling little man. 'Mr.
---------------
moment--into this window, Sir, where we can be alone--there, sir, there,
---------------
think--that fifty pounds and liberty would be better than Miss Wardle
---------------
time--great deal to be done with fifty pounds, my dear Sir.'
---------------
'More to be done with a hundred and fifty,' replied Mr. Jingle coolly. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
RECORDING Mr. PICKWICK'S DETERMINATION TO BE PRESENT AT AN ELECTION; AND
---------------
but be sensible of, and was wholly at a loss to account for. There was a
---------------
that you would be home with his sister at night, the melancholy which
---------------
the morning, with a strict injunction that it should not be delivered
---------------
overcome. You do not know what it is, at one blow, to be deserted by a
---------------
when that spirit fails us, the burden is too heavy to be borne. We sink
---------------
hand. However, whether it be the genuine production of a maniac, or
---------------
more warmth into the salutation, the comparison would not be quite
---------------
resolution. Any repetition of his arguments would be useless; for what
---------------
ancient alms-houses in this place. It must not be lost.'
---------------
which he probably meant to be very cunning. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
The astonishment of the village may be easily imagined, when (the little
---------------
was clearly to be deciphered:--
---------------
* 'To-morrow,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'This treasure must be at once deposited
---------------
where it can be thoroughly investigated and properly understood. I have
---------------
gripe. Ho! ho! It's a grand thing to be mad! to be peeped at like a wild
---------------
from my sleep, and fall upon my knees, and pray to be spared from
---------------
would revive. I knew it must be so: that so it always had been, and so
---------------
disturbed, and I felt that before long my secret must be known. I could
---------------
stand back--for I took care to be getting closer to him all the time I
---------------
and excesses prolonged until their consequences could never be repaired.
---------------
had directed to be forwarded to the city, from Rochester), and being
---------------
* Mr. Blotton, indeed--and the name will be doomed to the undying contempt
---------------
stone to be ancient, but solemnly denied the antiquity of the
---------------
and more accustomed to be guided by the sound of words than by the
---------------
portrait of himself to be painted, and hung up in the club room. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
a great deal of sharpness, Mrs. Bardell, which may be of material use to
---------------
'Ah, to be sure,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'I never thought of that. When I am
---------------
in town, you'll always have somebody to sit with you. To be sure, so you
---------------
'I am sure I ought to be a very happy woman,' said Mrs. Bardell. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
who'll teach him, I'll be bound, more tricks in a week than he would
---------------
have any reason to be discontented with your present situation.'
---------------
are satisfactory, they shall be provided.'
---------------
I'm meant to be a footman, or a groom, or a gamekeeper, or a seedsman.
---------------
present day. Knowing the deep reliance to be placed on every note
---------------
should happen to be in the house. The waiter retired; and reappearing
---------------
and even if we could, it would be of no use, for they keep them very
---------------
* 'The contest,' said Pott, 'shall be prolonged so long as I have health
---------------
'I shall be delighted,' said Mr. Pott. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
can boldly say, on behalf of Mrs. Pott, that she will be delighted to
---------------
the only feasible arrangement that could be made. So it WAS made; and
---------------
'I shall be very happy to learn under your tuition,' replied Mr. Winkle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
coach should be upset in that wery place, and on that wery day!'
---------------
of; be particular about the children, my dear sir--it has always a great
---------------
'then it must be done. That's all.'
---------------
is generally disposed to be jocose, this very innocent action was
---------------
of half an hour's length, and wouldn't be stopped, because he had sent
---------------
would ever be dearer to their hearts than any earthly object; and each
---------------
the man who would eventually be returned. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
might frequently be seen lying on the pavements in a state of utter
---------------
things than women to be met with, sometimes.'
---------------
already, he expressed this wish to be submitted to the same process
---------------
persuading her to be a widow no longer, but to confer upon him the
---------------
indignant that the tall man should be in a fair way of keeping such an
---------------
and that while he pretended to be blowing it alight again, he was in
---------------
fact kissing the girl. Be this as it may, another light was obtained,
---------------
to be burnt. Shocking thing that, Tom."
---------------
off all the furniture, and run away. What would be the consequence? She
---------------
would be deserted and reduced to ruin, and I should catch my death of
---------------
* '"Miserable morning," said Tom. No. The chair would not be drawn into
---------------
before long, they and their contents would be his property. The tall man
---------------
very admirable husband, and whoever he is, he'll be a very lucky man."
---------------
* '"Don't be frightened," said Tom Smart. He slowly drew forth the letter,
---------------
Pickwick would be overcome by the disclosure; but seeing that he
---------------
'I shall be extremely happy to make the acquaintance of such a lady,
---------------
lips, sir, she will indeed be proud,' said the grave man. 'You have a
---------------
* 'And if any further ground of objection be wanting,' continued Mr.
---------------
jacket, with a two-inch tail, would be to me.'
---------------
or less spangled; and what can be prettier than spangles! It may be
---------------
that they would glitter if there were lamps; and nothing can be clearer
---------------
Eastern fairyland itself would appear to be clothed in as many dark and
---------------
murky colours, as must be the mind of the splenetic and unmanly being
---------------
young ladies, of whom one might be about twenty, and the other a year
---------------
human being can be made to look like a magnified toad--all which feats
---------------
Fitz-Marshall, my dear, to come up to me directly, to be scolded for
---------------
* 'No, no--I'll do it--shan't be long--back in no time,' replied Jingle.
---------------
whom I very much want to introduce you. The count will be delighted with
---------------
CHAPTER XVI. TOO FULL OF ADVENTURE TO BE BRIEFLY DESCRIBED
---------------
small to work, but too mischievous to be left at home, scrambles over
---------------
the nefarious Jingle, in any quarter in which he might be pursuing his
---------------
over the means by which his purpose could be best attained. By degrees
---------------
gen'l'm'n's servant. I shall be a gen'l'm'n myself one of these days,
---------------
Who knows? I shouldn't be surprised for one.'
---------------
delay. 'Now, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'the first thing to be done is
---------------
Charles Fitz-Marshall had ordered his private room to be retained for
---------------
'Then you can arrange what's best to be done, sir, and we can act
---------------
As it appeared that this was the best arrangement that could be made, it
---------------
reading what appeared to be a hymn-book, with an air of deep
---------------
'Why, if I felt less like a walking brandy-bottle I shouldn't be quite
---------------
* 'I do, indeed. Worse than that, my master's going to be married.'
---------------
* 'No, no,' said Mr. Trotter, in conclusion, 'that's not to be told
---------------
it was conveyed, ordered the pewter vessel to be refilled, whereat the
---------------
'Instant measures must be taken,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'I will see the
---------------
'What had better be done, then?' said Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'But this taking him in the very act of elopement, would be a very
---------------
'I think it might be very easily done.'
---------------
the two servants, will be secreted in the kitchen at ten o'clock. When
---------------
the young lady out of her bedroom. A post-chaise will be waiting, and
---------------
like such an unpleasant discovery to be made before more persons
---------------
than can possibly be helped. The young lady, too, sir--consider her
---------------
would be just in the very moment of time to assist me in frustrating the
---------------
'You will be sure to be near this door that you speak of?'
---------------
it. I shall be sure to be there.'
---------------
scratches. Go away, or we shall be overheard.'
---------------
the centre of the garden, he might be consigned to a constable. Once or
---------------
'Cook,' said the lady abbess, who took care to be on the top stair, the
---------------
door was just going to be closed in consequence, when an inquisitive
---------------
'He must be respectable--he keeps a manservant,' said Miss Tomkins to
---------------
these here premises as has said so, I shall be wery happy to give 'em
---------------
there could be any men on the premises of Westgate House Establishment
---------------
much needed, could a single observation be drawn from him. He seemed
---------------
church; and who was to be found every day, from nine till four, teaching
---------------
heart, to boast should be his daughter's property when she found a man
---------------
to her mind. I repeat it, to be matter of profound astonishment and
---------------
feigned to be reading a book, throw sidelong glances over the way in
---------------
too, and pretended to be absorbed in meditation, as indeed he really
---------------
There was something in Kate's manner that was not to be resisted, and so
---------------
heart were at her father's disposal; but that nobody could be insensible
---------------
a delightful thing to see affection in families, but it may be carried
---------------
Lobbs must be very particularly fond of her relations, if she paid as
---------------
spirit, to be one of them. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
towards Mr. Winkle, it will be readily imagined that considerable
---------------
the visitor. 'Pleasantry, sir!--But--no, I will be calm; I will be calm,
---------------
word, sir,' when it comes to be read; but the tone of voice in which it
---------------
reference to some revenge to be thereafter visited upon the head of
---------------
* 'It's a shame,' said the bodyguard reproachfully. 'I know he'll be the
---------------
* 'Never, ma'am--never,' said Goodwin.'Oh, sir, you should be careful--you
---------------
* 'And now,' sobbed Mrs. Pott, 'now, after all, to be treated in this way;
---------------
to be reproached and insulted in the presence of a third party, and
---------------
brother, the lieutenant, shall interfere. I'll be separated, Goodwin!'
---------------
hysterical, requested to be informed why she was ever born, and required
---------------
deserve to be horsewhipped myself--that's all.'
---------------
back, or look sentimental about it; it can't be helped, old fellow. For
---------------
* 'Yes, a wedding. But don't be frightened,' said the good-humoured old
---------------
her go. But come! Here's the dinner. You must be hungry after your ride.
---------------
on us! what's this? It must be a jest; it--it--can't be true.'
---------------
her heart,' said Wardle, with a smile, 'you should certainly be the best
---------------
there'll be nobody to interrupt us, and there's a fine bit of turf
---------------
* 'I won't suffer this barrow to be moved another step,' said Mr.
---------------
Pickwick; 'I am not going to be shot in a wheel-barrow, for the sake of
---------------
* 'We shall very likely be up with another covey in five minutes,' said
---------------
genius, he had at once observed that the two great points to be attained
---------------
"Ah," says he, "I do--a good many," says he, "You must be wery fond o'
---------------
says I. "Mean!" says he. "That I'll never be a party to the combination
---------------
whether it would be better for Mr. Weller to wheel his master back
---------------
again, or to leave him where he was, until they should all be ready to
---------------
begged very hard to be one of the party, it was determined to leave Mr.
---------------
prospect as if he thought the prospect ought to be highly gratified
---------------
Boldwig. 'He's only feigning to be asleep now,' said the captain, in
---------------
was not to be found. After some hours of fruitless search, they arrived
---------------
* 'When will Mr. Dodson be back, sir?' inquired Mr. Pickwick. 'Can't say.'
---------------
'Will it be long before Mr. Fogg is disengaged, Sir?'
---------------
with his large family and small income, he'll be all the better for
---------------
of being who seemed to be an essential part of the desk at which he was
---------------
statement, Sir, may be true, or it may be false; it may be credible, or
---------------
it may be incredible; but, if it be true, and if it be credible, I do
---------------
and not to be shaken. You may be an unfortunate man, Sir, or you may be
---------------
'We shall be very happy to do so,' said Fogg, rubbing his hands. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
battledores, in which case it gets too excitin' to be pleasant. Come
---------------
to be carried on here.'
---------------
by your father, my boy, and be wery careful o' widders all your life,
---------------
wouldn't be amiss.'
---------------
in seeing him; I shall not be able to get one wink of sleep to-night, I
---------------
bowels of the earth, in which this mighty cavern might be supposed
---------------
consider as the 'stump,' we have said all that need be said of the
---------------
out. He'll be done directly, Sir.'
---------------
Sam to solace himself in the tap, suffered himself to be conducted into
---------------
surprise seemed to be by no means diminished, when his eyes rested on an
---------------
room for five minutes, I shall be very much obliged to you.'
---------------
human nature. He suffered himself to be led to the table, where, after
---------------
'I should be very sorry to say I wasn't,' interposed another gentleman
---------------
too, it would be all the better. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
the old man was a remarkable personage, it will be more respectful to
---------------
certainly,' said Mr. Pickwick, laughing. 'To be sure you didn't,' said
---------------
in the evening: he got nervous and uncomfortable, and used to be always
---------------
whether it would ever be paid for, and if so, in how many years' time,
---------------
to break up your old carcass, than it would ever be worth afterward, I'd
---------------
a moment's reflection, that it must be some young fellow in the next
---------------
the appearance of that press, I should be disposed to say that it is
---------------
that they might be much more comfortable elsewhere, you will confer a
---------------
'It may be my fancy, or it may be that I cannot separate the place from
---------------
moment of his life, his whole energies should be directed to this one
---------------
object; that his revenge should be protracted and terrible; that his
---------------
hatred should be undying and inextinguishable; and should hunt its
---------------
* 'It was necessary that his wife's body should be removed from the
---------------
caused himself to be carried from the scene of his loss and misery,
---------------
defendant be a man of straw, who is to pay the costs, Sir?"
---------------
spoke--"any sum, and it is yours. Don't be afraid to name it, man. I
---------------
client might be safely relied upon, commenced his work in earnest.
---------------
certain ruin in which the opposite party must be involved, which poured
---------------
must be paid. Land, house, furniture, each in its turn, was taken under
---------------
forgotten. The next day is an anniversary in his life: let it be done
---------------
called Little College Street, and which, whatever it may be now, was
---------------
himself down upon it afterwards. 'The governor hisself'll be down here
---------------
Sammy; and she is uncommon pious, to be sure. She's too good a creetur
---------------
half-a-crown. All applications to be made to the committee. Secretary,
---------------
leather hat-box was obliged to be raked up from the lowest depth of the
---------------
greater call there seems to be for oysters. Look here, sir; here's a
---------------
'To be sure he does,' said Mr. Weller, senior; 'and it's just the same
---------------
wretched attempt to be cheerful, but was fast sinking beneath the
---------------
in the effect they will produce, will be invaluable to me, sir.'
---------------
Mr. Pickwick. I heard she would be here to-night and all to-morrow
---------------
perhaps, than she would be at home. What do you think, Mr. Pickwick?'
---------------
to your feelings. I know what it is to be jilted, Sir; I have endured
---------------
shall be pale to-morrow, Mr. Pickwick.'
---------------
more stairs there seemed to be to descend, and again and again, when Mr.
---------------
could be seen than his face and nightcap, and putting on his spectacles,
---------------
consequences will be still more frightful.' Mr. Pickwick, it is quite
---------------
he would, he couldn't get it off. The disclosure must be made. There
---------------
'If this improbable story be really true, Sir,' said the lady, sobbing
---------------
to be supposed that he could find his way in perfect darkness to a room
---------------
combination of colours which is only to be seen in gentlemen of his
---------------
markets, no, not six months--who'd ha' scorned to be let in, in such a
---------------
can't be helped, and that's one consolation, as they always says in
---------------
coaches, Sammy, is like guns--they requires to be loaded with wery great
---------------
boy, pison yourself, and you'll be glad on it arterwards.' With these
---------------
of Mr. Job Trotter to be easily mistaken. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
filling with tears as he spoke, 'will be, that I shall be able to leave
---------------
* 'To be sure it was,' replied Job. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'I shall be sure to come,' said Job. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
shall perhaps be askin' arter you, at the other side of the green gate,
---------------
'I shall be sure to be with you, sir,' said Mr. Trotter; and wringing
---------------
I shall be one too many for you this time. I shall, indeed.' Having
---------------
uttered this soliloquy, and looked after Job till he was to be seen no
---------------
* 'But when is this to be done, Sam?' inquired Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* Whether it was done in good time, or not, will be seen hereafter. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
I should be sorry if you were induced to regulate your proceedings by
---------------
that to anybody else, I must be a very desirable object. I should
---------------
Perhaps I might then be tempted to seize her hand.'
---------------
'Yes, I see,' said Mr. Magnus; 'that would be a very great point.'
---------------
'You think that may be taken for granted?' said Mr. Magnus; 'because, if
---------------
she did not do that at the right place, it would be embarrassing.'
---------------
suppose the lady would be applying to her eyes at the moment, and steal
---------------
delicacy; it shall never be revealed by ME depend upon it.'
---------------
There must be something very comprehensive in this phrase of 'Never
---------------
observable, too, that there would appear to be some hidden taunt in this
---------------
terrible, and commanded that the lady should be shown in; which command,
---------------
Witherfield, 'but I fear a duel is going to be fought here.'
---------------
of the kind can be contemplated in this town, I am persuaded. Bless my
---------------
of his having very little indeed to be merry about; and, being ordered
---------------
is weak and paralysed. They shall be made an example of. Draw up the
---------------
it continued to be cited daily. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
not be violated in this portion of his dominions. Grummer, procure
---------------
which had only to be thought of to be done, as a matter of course. This
---------------
species of blasphemy not to be tolerated. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
conveyance that could be obtained. The dispute ran high, and the dilemma
---------------
notion of the nature of the offence, could not but be much edified and
---------------
WILL BE FOUND IN ITS PLACE
---------------
sooner we shall begin to be on a pleasant understanding. Business first,
---------------
neglect of duty, Mr. Grummer; you shall be made an example of. Take that
---------------
right to be heard so far as I am personally concerned.'
---------------
* 'Sam, be quiet,' said Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'They must be townspeople,' said the magistrate. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
aloud, with great dignity, 'and they must be householders, of course.'
---------------
I should wish him to be present.'
---------------
he might be able to effect an immediate escape, in case there was the
---------------
know that person to be a--'
---------------
'Hush, hush,' said Mr. Nupkins, closing the door. 'Know him to be what,
---------------
the Porkenhams say! What would be the triumph of Mr. Sidney Porkenham
---------------
quarter-sessions! And what a handle would it be for the opposition
---------------
'Why,' said Mr. Nupkins, 'that might be very easily done, for he will
---------------
be here to-night, and then there would be no occasion to make the matter
---------------
strictly true? Now be careful, sir!' 'Your Wash-up,' stammered Grummer,
---------------
warn you to be careful. Mr. Jinks, take his words down.'
---------------
had always said it would be so; that her advice was never taken; that
---------------
in her own mind, that the best thing to do would be to ask Mr. Pickwick
---------------
had spoken truly, the captain could be turned out of the house without
---------------
his peculiar sagacity, had discovered in half an hour to be one of the
---------------
is of you, Mr. Weller, to be sure!'
---------------
a gentleman as master has sent down, to be made as comfortable as
---------------
hope our acquaintance may be a long 'un, as the gen'l'm'n said to the
---------------
* ''Cos ugliness and svindlin' never ought to be formiliar with elegance
---------------
Mr. Trotter suffered himself to be forced into a chair by the fireside.
---------------
'And as was ever a-going to be married to a cook,' said that lady
---------------
'It's very probable, sir, that you won't be wanted upstairs for several
---------------
before ladies, but the urgency of the case will be my excuse. The back
---------------
servants to overhear. Let these wretches be removed.'
---------------
boy--but must NOT be passionate--bad thing, very--bye, bye--see you
---------------
as might be requisite for their forthcoming visit to Dingley Dell;
---------------
should be looked up, and put together. I wish you would step up to
---------------
really probable that this vile and groundless action is to be carried
---------------
to be lighted--a pair of small boots pattered over the floor-cloth, and
---------------
* Mrs. Bardell felt it proper to be agitated; and as none of the three
---------------
otherwise than through Dodson & Fogg, ought to be held with Mr.
---------------
state of indecision, obviously the first thing to be done, was to thump
---------------
'I think two witnesses would be more lawful,' said Mrs. Sanders, who,
---------------
* 'To be sure,' replied Mrs. Cluppins, eagerly catching at the idea; 'walk
---------------
it can't be helped, you see.'
---------------
glances at the little tin saucepan, seemed to be engaged in a mental
---------------
things is to be put together, and give to anybody as we sends for 'em.
---------------
'Ah,' said Sam, 'to be sure; that's the question.'
---------------
* 'It's a terrible thing to be dragged before the public, in that way, Mr.
---------------
* 'And won't Mr. Dodson and Fogg be wild if the plaintiff shouldn't get
---------------
* 'Oh, there can't be any doubt about it,' rejoined Mrs. Sanders. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
If he didn't give it me, I took it, for fear I should be led to do
---------------
convenient, and small enough to be snug. On the opposite side of the
---------------
of acquaintance, if he could have reasonably expected to be more
---------------
inconvenience. However, there he was; and as he couldn't be decently
---------------
as if the subject were too painful to be alluded to. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
wouldn't be persuaded by the ladies, wouldn't he?' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
shepherd hadn't paid a farden, not he--perhaps it might be on account
---------------
'll be softened, and turned in the right vay, but he rayther thinks
---------------
'I would,' said Sam. 'I wouldn't be too hard upon him at first. I'd
---------------
'Nonsense, mother,' said Wardle. 'Come, come, don't be cross, there's
---------------
of excitement and agitation which it would be impossible to describe.
---------------
and beg it to be distinctly understood that we indulge in no hidden
---------------
and which we should be still more unwilling to be supposed to ridicule. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'I shall be delighted, my boy,' said Wardle. 'Joe--damn that boy, he's
---------------
Whereupon Mr. Winkle gallantly inquired if it couldn't be done by
---------------
My young friend, Trundle, I believe to be a very excellent and manly
---------------
fellow; and his wife I know to be a very amiable and lovely girl, well
---------------
Pickwick--'I wish I was young enough to be her sister's husband
---------------
(cheers), but, failing that, I am happy to be old enough to be her
---------------
father; for, being so, I shall not be suspected of any latent designs
---------------
more, wen you comes to be a man you'll lay yourself open to the same
---------------
"you'll be robbed on it," says they. "Shall I?" says he. "Yes, you
---------------
once found it useless to resist any longer, and submitted to be kissed
---------------
* 'Fill up,' cried Wardle. 'It will be two hours, good, before you see the
---------------
Let the blossoms and buds be borne;
---------------
He shall never be sought by me;
---------------
So let Autumn air be never so fair,
---------------
while ago--so long, that the story must be a true one, because our
---------------
the emblems of mortality, therefore he should be a morose and melancholy
---------------
appeared to be frozen up, all was so cold and still. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
was to be seen. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
questioner might be in the excise department of the goblins. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
heart, because the boy could be merry, and he could not. We know him, we
---------------
appeared to be a large cavern, surrounded on all sides by crowds of
---------------
upon their faces, whom Gabriel Grub imagined to be courtiers, on that
---------------
returning to a place where his repentance would be scoffed at, and his
---------------
one at any time, gradually died off; and be the matter how it may, as
---------------
make up his mind to be not a bit the better for it: let the spirits
---------------
be never so good, or let them be even as many degrees beyond proof, as
---------------
* 'I shall be down in a quarter of an hour, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick,
---------------
'I have not been, but I shall be very happy to be, Arabella,' replied
---------------
'I should be very happy, I'm sure,' said Mr. Winkle, reddening; 'but I
---------------
* The command was not to be resisted. Mr. Winkle allowed Sam to obey it,
---------------
* 'I should be very happy to afford you any amusement,' replied Mr.
---------------
invigorating sight that can possibly be imagined, to behold him gather
---------------
who might be within hearing, the clearest possible notion of the
---------------
to be very cosy, and that his friend Ben was to be one of the party,
---------------
may be, they are all to be seen, at certain regulated business hours,
---------------
head. 'But it won't do. No harm in trying, but there's little to be got
---------------
little parlour behind the shop, sets to a-screamin', says he'll be the
---------------
bills printed, sayin' that, if he'd come back, he should be forgiven
---------------
my family ain't a-goin' to be choked for nothin'; and more than that,
---------------
'When do you think he'll be back?' inquired the stranger. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'You don't think it would be of any use my waiting for him?' said the
---------------
into the centre of the doorway. 'He's certain not to be back this week,
---------------
and it's a chance whether he will be next; for when Perker once gets out
---------------
'Ask him to be so kind as to leave out word what has been done in my
---------------
couldn't be done, my dear Sir; it couldn't be done.'
---------------
done, but that it should be done; and the consequence was, that within
---------------
pinch of snuff with a zest which seemed to be compounded of a fondness
---------------
however, the clerk allowed himself to be gently drawn beyond the hearing
---------------
about five-and-forty, or--as the novels say--he might be fifty. He had
---------------
that dull-looking, boiled eye which is often to be seen in the heads
---------------
not to be mistaken, that Mr. Serjeant Snubbin was far too much occupied
---------------
leg, and waited to be spoken to. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
the plaintiff's demand, he would not be there at all. I believe I state
---------------
circumstance may be attributed the vulgar but very general notion of
---------------
add, that unless you sincerely believe this, I would rather be deprived
---------------
reassumed his pen, he appeared to be again aware of the presence of his
---------------
must be a very young man.'
---------------
now.) 'Mr. Phunky, and say I should be glad if he'd step here, a
---------------
appear to be a natural defect, but seemed rather the result of timidity,
---------------
appeared to be completed. The umbrellas in the passage had been heaped
---------------
ought to be able to pay her confounded "little bill."' 'How long has it
---------------
* 'It'll be a deuced unpleasant thing if she takes it into her head to
---------------
question, 'that before the middle of next week we shall be able to set
---------------
there may be some persons here as will make you, Sir.'
---------------
dog in the streets. He ought to be ashamed of himself (here Mrs. Raddle
---------------
sobbed) to allow his wife to be treated in this way by a parcel of young
---------------
possibly be required of her under the circumstances. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
afraid to go down, lest he should be waylaid by Mrs. Raddle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
say he wouldn't. There must be a splendid operation, though,
---------------
after it was all over, boy said he wouldn't lie there to be made game
---------------
Jack Hopkins. 'Not all at once, you know, that would be too much--you
---------------
* 'So I should be disposed to imagine,' replied Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
winks and interruptions of Mr. Bob Sawyer, that it was to be conveyed
---------------
* 'I should be very sorry, Sawyer,' said Mr. Noddy, 'to create any
---------------
'And I should be very sorry, Sawyer, to create any disturbance in the
---------------
shrillness and rapidity of utterance. 'Ain't it enough to be swindled
---------------
'You ought to be ashamed of yourselves,' said the voice of Mr. Raddle,
---------------
* 'It's hardly to be borne,' said the prim man, looking round. 'Hardly to
---------------
'Not to be endured,' replied Jack Hopkins; 'let's have the other verse,
---------------
withdrawing the nightcap. 'Old enough to be his grandfather, you willin!
---------------
that there was anything whatever to be done, for the consultation
---------------
had taken place, and the course of proceeding to be adopted, had been
---------------
the first time, may be allowed to labour under some temporary irritation
---------------
the said commission might be directed to the tea or table spoons of the
---------------
to be served with a sheet of the best gilt-edged letter-paper, and a
---------------
hard-nibbed pen which could be warranted not to splutter. These articles
---------------
* 'He won't be here this three-quarters of an hour or more,' said the
---------------
down the table, so that there might be no crumbs of bread under the
---------------
* 'Nev'r mind, Sammy,' replied Mr. Weller, 'it'll be a wery agonisin'
---------------
afeerd he should be obliged to kill him for the London market.'
---------------
'Wot'll be a trial?' inquired Sam. 'To see you married, Sammy--to see
---------------
the family, and couldn't be helped, which calmed Mr. Weller's feelings,
---------------
and caused his grief to subside. We should be rather disposed to
---------------
Sam dipped his pen into the ink to be ready for any corrections, and
---------------
arms at once, which is wery well known to be a collection o' fabulous
---------------
But Sam was not to be dissuaded from the poetical idea that had occurred
---------------
'He's a-goin' to be tried to-morrow, ain't he?'
---------------
'ud be this here--never mind the character, and stick to the alleybi.
---------------
mean?' said Sam; 'you don't think he's a-goin' to be tried at the Old
---------------
Weller. 'Verever he's a-goin' to be tried, my boy, a alleybi's the thing
---------------
alleybi, he'll be what the Italians call reg'larly flummoxed, and that's
---------------
from us, he can't be comfortable unless he has somethin' to remember us
---------------
shove him in, if necessary), he'll be as far gone in rum-and-water, as
---------------
inquiry, to be compounded of warm porter, moist sugar, gin, and nutmeg
---------------
and penniless; thinks it must be the porter (cheers) or the loss of the
---------------
thirst upon him; thinks it must be the wine he used to drink (cheers).
---------------
* 'He ain't far out there, Sammy,' replied Mr. Weller; 'they MUST be a
---------------
soft sex--a wery soft sex, indeed--if they let themselves be gammoned by
---------------
for a coach, my dear sir, or we shall be rather late.'
---------------
the leading counsel in the case, any instructions that may be necessary
---------------
* 'Answer to your names, gentlemen, that you may be sworn,' said the
---------------
* 'Then you ought to be able to afford it, Sir,' said the judge,
---------------
* 'I am to be sworn, my Lord, am I?' said the chemist. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
there'll be murder before this trial's over; that's all. Swear me, if
---------------
imbecility, the good lady requested to be informed where she was. In
---------------
to a single gentleman, then, shall my lodgings be let." Actuated by this
---------------
villainy, let me tell the defendant Pickwick, if he be in court, as I
---------------
head of the attempter, be he plaintiff or be he defendant, be his name
---------------
it will be impossible for my learned friend to weaken or controvert,
---------------
I understand to be a particular species of marbles much prized by the
---------------
however, taking special care that there would be no witness to their
---------------
have passed between these parties, letters which are admitted to be in
---------------
must be viewed with a cautious and suspicious eye--letters that were
---------------
is the happiness of a sensitive and confiding female to be trifled away,
---------------
is in itself suspicious. "Dear Mrs. B., I shall not be at home
---------------
coach mean? For aught I know, it may be a reference to Pickwick himself,
---------------
whole of this transaction, but whose speed will now be very unexpectedly
---------------
will very soon be greased by you!'
---------------
'You had better be careful, Sir,' said the little judge, with a sinister
---------------
Lordship's injunctions to be careful. I believe you are a particular
---------------
answer the question, you'll be committed, Sir,' interposed the little
---------------
mind, Mr. Winkle, which I fear would be of little service to honest,
---------------
suspicion cast upon it. But as it could afford to be placed in a rather
---------------
'Oh, no,' replied Mr. Winkle; 'old enough to be my father.'
---------------
have no doubt, might be easily explained.'
---------------
an angry countenance over his desk, said, 'You had better be careful,
---------------
power, p'raps I might be able to see through a flight o' stairs and a
---------------
* Speechless with indignation, Mr. Pickwick allowed himself to be led
---------------
change and gaiety he would be inclined to think better of his
---------------
* There were just two places to be had inside, and just three to be had
---------------
uncomfortable; it would be no travellers' room if it were not. It is the
---------------
* 'Not inside--I'll be damned if you're going inside,' said the strange
---------------
'Wot, ain't nothin' to be done in consequence, sir?' exclaimed Sam,
---------------
* 'Done!' said Mr. Pickwick. 'What should be done?' 'Ain't nobody to be
---------------
him to remain taciturn, that the fact may be considered wholly
---------------
contrived to be very companionable all the way. The outsides did
---------------
young man on the box who wished to be learned in cattle; and an old one
---------------
Bath, where the waiters, from their costume, might be mistaken for
---------------
'The register of the distinguished visitors in Ba-ath will be at the
---------------
shall be here again in an hour. Come.'
---------------
would be ready directly. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
you owe to society, and don't let yourself be injured by too much work.
---------------
mammas, appearing to be wholly absorbed by the conversation in which
---------------
but which may be turned to surprisingly good account by expert
---------------
partners for them, and not playing cards lest they should be set down as
---------------
Mr. Pickwick happened to be looking another way at the moment, so her
---------------
* 'My friend Mr. Pickwick, my Lady, will be most happy, I am sure,
---------------
her daughter's cheek with her fan, 'and are always to be trusted. He's
---------------
CHAPTER XXXVI. THE CHIEF FEATURES OF WHICH WILL BE FOUND TO BE
---------------
isn't expected to be over till late; so I was thinking that if you
---------------
fine young man, he perceived what a grand thing it would be to have
---------------
him married without delay, so that his children might be the means of
---------------
they couldn't agree in arranging this marriage, he should be under the
---------------
and magnanimity, and that his daughter was quite ready to be married,
---------------
a family) should be considered privy to his flight, and punished
---------------
especially if that somebody be at a party. You cannot help thinking how
---------------
bounds of possibility that somebody might be knocking at the street
---------------
house might be on fire, he hastily threw the door wide open, and holding
---------------
* It is not unlikely that the inquiry may be made, where Mr. Weller was,
---------------
'Wery odd that,' said Sam; 'I'm afeerd there must be somethin' the
---------------
* 'It must be somethin' wery uncommon indeed, as could perduce a letter
---------------
ven he wos took with fits. It can't be from the gov'ner,' said Sam,
---------------
usual trimmings. The swarry to be on table at half-past nine o'clock
---------------
* 'Ah, to be sure,' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
again. 'Perhaps we had better be walking,' said Mr. Smauker, consulting
---------------
down a by-street; 'we shall soon be there.'
---------------
* 'Yes,' said Mr. John Smauker. 'Don't be alarmed, Mr. Weller.'
---------------
stranger, perhaps, they'll be rather hard upon you at first.'
---------------
'They won't be wery cruel, though, will they?' inquired Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
it: the chief and most important of whom appeared to be a stoutish
---------------
'Not by no means, Blazes,' replied Sam. 'It 'ud be a wery chilly subject
---------------
'I hope, gentlemen,' said Harris, 'that you won't be severe with me,
---------------
hoped he should be better acquainted with him, for without any flattery
---------------
and to be just the man after his own heart. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'I should think she couldn't wery well be off o' that,' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
but with the others, gin-and-water, sweet, appeared to be the favourite
---------------
green-foil smalls, whether the chairman could be legally appealed to,
---------------
in the cocked hat had no doubt that the company would be very happy to
---------------
the long coat, 'having the misforchune to be a coachman, and being only
---------------
* 'You may well be sapparised, gentlemen,' said the coachman. 'I will not
---------------
of a change, and as it might be inconvenient to empty a tumbler at every
---------------
toast, he should propose that the honours be understood. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
swarry as ever he'll be troubled with agin.'
---------------
Sam thought it would be a pity to contradict him, and so let him have
---------------
gone. He must be found, Sam. Found and brought back to me.' 'And s'pose
---------------
* 'He must be made, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'I'll be wery careful, sir,' rejoined Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
never be too highly appreciated or too warmly extolled. 'If,' reasoned
---------------
myself, it will be incumbent on me to call him out. He has a wife; that
---------------
him in the blindness of my wrath, what would be my feelings ever
---------------
again, twice a day or more, could be reasonably supposed to arrive
---------------
anybody who might happen to be in the back parlour, which he judged to
---------------
I wasn't at home, but if you'd leave a message I'd be sure to give it
---------------
and the pills to be taken four times a day at the ill-tempered old
---------------
it, and reads the label: "Draught to be taken at bedtime--pills as
---------------
in his heart. Could he be the object of it? Could it be for him that the
---------------
Bob Sawyer and Ben Allen should be considered at liberty to fill twice
---------------
bell-handle, but that unfortunately happened to be immediately behind
---------------
* 'Mr. Winkle, Sir. Be calm. Don't strike me. I won't bear it. A blow!
---------------
must be secured by some further understanding. You used a threat against
---------------
natural. So should I. I was wrong. I beg your pardon. Be friendly.
---------------
did you follow? Be frank. Tell me.'
---------------
* 'You,' replied Dowler. 'I went downstairs. You were not to be found.
---------------
must inevitably have occurred. Mr. Dowler appeared to be impressed with
---------------
of his shell by means of a pin, and he conseqvently began to be afeered
---------------
that he should be obliged to crack him in the parlour door.' At the end
---------------
* 'No,' said Sam, shaking his head. 'Can't be done.'
---------------
firmness, and energetically replied, 'It can't be done.'
---------------
the door should be instantly unlocked. That a letter should be written
---------------
thereof. And, lastly, that Mr. Winkle should be understood as distinctly
---------------
'The governor distinctly said it was to be done. Amazin' stupid o' me,
---------------
excellent and hospitable friend's, Winkle. It would be an ill return to
---------------
shrewdly suspected by the male and female domestics to be deeply
---------------
'ud be worth a life's board wages at least, to you, and 'ud be cheap at
---------------
and say they needn't mind puttin' any by, for it'll be cold afore I come
---------------
to be done, and revolving in his mind a plan for knocking at all the
---------------
moments before--from both of which tokens we should be disposed to infer
---------------
'Ah, to be sure,' said Sam, with a cunning look, 'that's the pint. Who
---------------
pieces of carpet--at least, there may be no great harm in the shaking,
---------------
as innocent an amusement as can well be devised; but when the folding
---------------
a sixteenth, and then to a thirty-second, if the carpet be long enough,
---------------
garden seat, which happened by good luck to be near at hand. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
when the conversation threatened to be interrupted by the unwelcome
---------------
* 'We must be careful,' said Mr. Pickwick, after listening attentively to
---------------
to be the father of both parties--the voice of calumny can never be
---------------
and order a conveyance to be at the door to-morrow evening, rather
---------------
earlier than is absolutely necessary, in order that we may be in good
---------------
Weller; 'but wen you don't want to be seen, I think they're more useful
---------------
seemed to have any very distinct apprehension of what was to be done
---------------
done, sir, will be for Mr. Weller to give you a hoist up into the tree,
---------------
'That 'ere blessed lantern 'ull be the death on us all,' exclaimed Sam
---------------
'It'll be vun too powerful for us, if you keep blazin' avay in that
---------------
of Arabella, on the other side, 'don't be frightened, my dear, it's only
---------------
* 'All right, sir,' replied Mr. Weller. 'Don't be longer than you can
---------------
may be a satisfaction to you, to know that I am present. That's all, my
---------------
inevitably be the case if the speculation of the ingenious Mr. Pruffle
---------------
to be considered a light of science ever afterwards. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
Smouch, requesting Mr. Pickwick in a surly manner 'to be as alive as
---------------
the world, and captivating freedom of manner, which is to be acquired in
---------------
* 'Thank you, no, I shan't want it; I expect I shall be out, in the course
---------------
offered the razor, whose name appeared to be Price. 'Never!' Mr. Price
---------------
'Chances be d--d,' replied Price; 'he hasn't half the ghost of one. I
---------------
and I must have a stimulant, or I shan't be able to pitch it strong
---------------
on, was about to inquire whether he could not be accommodated with a
---------------
* It would appear, however, that matters were not going to be made all
---------------
habeas-corpus. There'll be no judge at chambers till four o'clock this
---------------
and could on no account be disturbed before. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
the change; and Mr. Pickwick, stepping to one side to be out of the way
---------------
wish it--in fact I had some curiosity to look at it when I should be at
---------------
large number of attorneys' clerks to be sworn, and it being a moral
---------------
was soon afterwards confided to the custody of the tipstaff, to be by
---------------
* 'And that,' said Mr. Pickwick, laughing, 'will be a very long time. Sam,
---------------
'They von't be long, Sir, I des-say,' replied Sam. 'There's a Dutch
---------------
'You'll be chummed on somebody to-morrow, and then you'll be all snug
---------------
you'll be set all squares to-morrow.'
---------------
eye; which might be considered to mean, either that he would have
---------------
'He must be a first-rater,' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
room, some solitary tenant might be seen poring, by the light of a
---------------
crowd of children, might be seen making up a scanty bed on the ground,
---------------
afore I die; and if I ain't struck with apoplexy, I'll be back in five
---------------
can be seen in full perfection but in such places--they may be met
---------------
hot-beds, which would almost seem to be considerately provided by the
---------------
sent 'em before, only I was afraid they might be broken in the wagon,
---------------
which sentiment, indeed, did him infinite credit, as he could be in no
---------------
came upstairs, it would be as well. Here, you sir, just run downstairs,
---------------
thought. Run and tell him that; d'ye hear? They shan't be wasted,'
---------------
to himself, that a gentleman must not be particular under such
---------------
appeared to be that, on some occasion particularly stated and set forth,
---------------
* 'Don't be impertinent to a gentleman, Sir,' said Mr. Smangle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
man, it 'ud be more agreeable for all parties, as the schoolmaster said
---------------
'Plenty of that, Mr. Pickwick. Your chummage ticket will be on
---------------
room will be your chums.'
---------------
goer he used to be sure-ly! You remember Tom Martin, Neddy?' said Roker,
---------------
would be advisable to see, and hold personal converse with, the three
---------------
length appealed to a pot-boy, who happened to be pursuing his morning
---------------
considered it a matter of sound policy to be silent. Mr. Simpson mused
---------------
rather inferred that it must be some nickname which distinguished Mr.
---------------
* 'I suppose this can be managed somehow,' said the butcher, after
---------------
'What will you take to be paid out?' said the butcher. 'The regular
---------------
prison; I could not be more forgotten or unheeded than I am here. I am
---------------
sturdy felon shall be fed and clothed, and that the penniless debtor
---------------
shall be left to die of starvation and nakedness. This is no fiction.
---------------
what can be done, when I know all about the matter. Here, Job; where is
---------------
wish that you should not be idling about a place like this, for years
---------------
to come, I feel that for a debtor in the Fleet to be attended by his
---------------
shall continue to pay. Any one of my three friends will be happy to
---------------
of clothes in it at one time, than will be offered for sale in all
---------------
* It must not be supposed that any of these people have the least shadow
---------------
indefatigably attend. If they had, it would be no matter of surprise,
---------------
* A casual visitor might suppose this place to be a temple dedicated to
---------------
and if they can be said to have any vices at all, perhaps drinking
---------------
and console a friend, whose petition to be discharged under the act,
---------------
was to be that day heard, and whose attorney he was at that moment
---------------
should think it would be his turn in about half an hour. I told my clerk
---------------
time of the morning, it would be rather too good a--Well, I don't know,
---------------
Pell; and your country should be proud of you." Those were his very
---------------
that I am a good deal looked up to, in my profession--it may be that I
---------------
'without nobody to take his part! It can't be done, Samivel, it can't be
---------------
street-door knocker, wen there's so much to be done. Where's the money?'
---------------
notion. It mayn't be altogether safe, vith reference to gettin' out
---------------
of process; to be executed without delay upon the body of one Samuel
---------------
Weller; the charges thereby incurred, to be paid in advance to Solomon
---------------
was ordered to be discharged forthwith. He highly approved of Sam's
---------------
* 'The officer will be here at four o'clock,' said Mr. Pell. 'I suppose
---------------
Sam's attachment, to be able to exhibit any manifestation of anger or
---------------
that it can very easily be paid; and having made up My mind that you
---------------
* 'Beg your pardon, sir,' rejoined Sam, 'but it 'ud be a wery great favour
---------------
should be tempted to commit some rash act with the carving-knife. Vell,
---------------
down a little, "and so wery fillin' at the price." "They'd be dear to
---------------
says the doctor. "Three shillins' wurth 'ud be sure to do it, I s'pose?"
---------------
wouldn't be put out of his way for nobody!' With such like shiftings and
---------------
shoulder. 'You shall know him better. You'll be delighted with him. That
---------------
that while we are talking here, my friends may be in a state of great
---------------
fellow has got himself arrested, in order to be near me.'
---------------
unlike what it usually is. We feared there must be something the matter,
---------------
will be necessary for me to leave town, for a short time, on private
---------------
what 'It is, fear it should be a wrong 'un.'
---------------
Doctors' Commons. The bottle or two, indeed, might be more properly
---------------
or are we to be locked in?'
---------------
man be going to do?'
---------------
* 'He won't be a Chancery prisoner wery long, Sir,' replied Roker, turning
---------------
is to be kept up as much as possible; and the warden's sent him wine
---------------
then be lost amidst the roar of voices and the tramp of footsteps; the
---------------
'Aha!' replied the old gentleman, 'I began to be afeerd that you'd gone
---------------
* 'Don't be frightened, Sammy, don't be frightened,' said the old
---------------
Could I be accommodated, Sammy?'
---------------
an undertone, that he must be the representative of the united parishes
---------------
particular wanity to be sold in this here establishment.'
---------------
other compounds. It was accordingly ordered to be prepared, and pending
---------------
lady and Mr. Stiggins; 'I think there must be somethin' wrong in your
---------------
especially of Mr. Samuel, whom he adjured in moving terms to be upon his
---------------
* Mr. Stiggins did not desire his hearers to be upon their guard against
---------------
informed, casting scorn and contempt on what should be held most
---------------
continey to be a night coach till I'm took off the road altogether. Now,
---------------
nothin' as we go back, and p'raps that 'ere harm-cheer 'ull be tipped
---------------
'And wot 'ud be the good o' that?' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'They may be put on, Mr. Weller,' said Job. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
your room. You are tired, and not strong enough to be out long.'
---------------
Pickwick, thinking it might be expected of him, kept on smiling to the
---------------
to be passing at the moment. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
yard. The great body of the prison population appeared to be Mivins, and
---------------
heart too. Henceforth I will be a prisoner in my own room.'
---------------
'You ought to be ashamed of yourself, Raddle,' said the other little
---------------
* 'Don't talk to me, don't, you brute, for fear I should be perwoked to
---------------
care, he might lose her when he least expected it, which would be a very
---------------
* 'How sweet the country is, to be sure!' sighed Mrs. Rogers; 'I almost
---------------
burst into tears, and requested to be led from the table instantly; upon
---------------
to the first-floor lodger, 'that a woman could be married to such a
---------------
pressing business, which can't be postponed on any account. Indeed,
---------------
opinion that it must be very important, or Dodson & Fogg would never
---------------
displeasing to Mrs. Bardell, especially as it might be reasonably
---------------
had still to be ferreted out from the back parlour of the Magpie and
---------------
better to see Mr. Perker to-night, so that we may be there, the first
---------------
anybody else's case, Perker wouldn't be best pleased at my going up to
---------------
* 'At ten precisely, I will be there,' said the little man. 'Sam is quite
---------------
'I would rather that the subject should be never mentioned between us,
---------------
must be mentioned. I have come here on purpose. Now, are you ready to
---------------
wait. I have this morning's paper here. Your time shall be mine. There!'
---------------
my dear Sir, if you please, and do not be so very energetic, for it
---------------
Freeman Court sharks. Now pray be quiet, my dear sir.'
---------------
of the suit, will be sufficient to justify an indictment for conspiracy.
---------------
debauchery, to which no man should ever be consigned, if I had my will,
---------------
the more they gain, the more they'll seek, and so the sooner be led
---------------
imperatively required to be followed up, there was a low murmuring of
---------------
heartily with Perker, who, not to be behind-hand in the compliments of
---------------
married man myself, I should be disposed to envy you, you dog.' Thus
---------------
* 'I can never be grateful enough to you, Sam, I am sure,' said Arabella,
---------------
'Ah, to be sure!' interposed Perker; 'come, account for this idleness.
---------------
'Ah, to be sure,' said Perker gravely. 'You must take this matter in
---------------
certain we shall be reconciled. He is my only relation in the world, Mr.
---------------
friend, and be in the way to-morrow at one. Do you hear? Now, is there
---------------
'No. Because I saw it would be of no use,' replied Mr. Robert Sawyer. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
regarding the amount of minced veal which would be ultimately reserved
---------------
will be very important, and I must take you into the house with me. You
---------------
in what was meant to be a whisper, but which was an especially audible
---------------
of breath, and trembling from head to foot, 'don't be alarmed, my dear,
---------------
way, my dear ma'am. Don't be frightened, ma'am. We shall be able to set
---------------
'I should be very sorry to think it was the heart,' said the old lady,
---------------
to be employed in the abduction of my sister? I demand that you explain
---------------
couldn't be begun, and what couldn't be cured must be endured;
---------------
wished to know what she had done that no respect was to be paid to her
---------------
years or station, and that she should be obliged to beg and pray, in
---------------
envying, he would be the first to congratulate them upon. Hearing this,
---------------
* As Mr. Pickwick could by no means be prevailed upon to stay, it was
---------------
coach should be at the door, at nine o'clock next morning. He then took
---------------
perhaps his face might be a shade redder. He had the jolliest face you
---------------
were both suffocated, as nearly as could be ascertained, at the same
---------------
not be quite polite to go just then, my uncle voted himself into the
---------------
* 'There might be a dozen of them, or there might be more--my uncle was
---------------
that the mail-bags were not to be trifled with, and he resolved to
---------------
it wouldn't be better to wrench his blunderbuss from him, fire it in the
---------------
I fancy. This shall be made known. I'll write to the papers."
---------------
must be a VERY comfortable one;" with this, my uncle sat himself down in
---------------
he was to be run through, from behind, without showing fight at all.
---------------
a little quiet bit of love-making would be agreeable after the
---------------
hence may be too late. The mail!" With these words, overpowered by
---------------
uncle, "that I'm afraid I shall be rude enough to kiss it."
---------------
and the trampling of hoofs; but there appeared to be so many horses and
---------------
her not to be frightened, pressed his lips to hers once more, and then
---------------
'They whirled past the dark trees, as feathers would be swept before
---------------
* 'Oh, ah! To be sure,' rejoined the landlord. 'I never thought of that.'
---------------
whisper, 'they will be all the better for it; for, being nearly out of
---------------
is to be wafered on the shop door: "Sawyer, late Nockemorf. Inquire of
---------------
of the local papers, it will be the making of me. Here's Ben; now then,
---------------
'Possibly,' replied Mr. Pickwick. 'It may be so. Perhaps it is.'
---------------
communications appeared to be passing between them and some persons
---------------
* 'What's to be done?' said Mr. Pickwick, looking at the bottle. 'This
---------------
'I think it would be best to take it in,' replied Mr. Ben Allen; 'it
---------------
* 'You cannot possibly be angry with him,' remarked Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
five minutes he returned and declared them to be excellent. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
could be procured on so short a notice, the key-bugle sounded, and the
---------------
brief as possible, and be content that, for their own sakes, they will
---------------
by the soda-water, he suffered himself to be prevailed upon to wash his
---------------
face and hands, and to submit to be brushed by Sam. Mr. Pickwick and Bob
---------------
to see you. Be seated, Mr. Pickwick, I beg, Sir. This gentleman is--'
---------------
the tone and spirit in which alone it ought to be discussed? You may
---------------
reading the letter, as Mr. Bob Sawyer thought, chanced to be looking
---------------
has no call to be surprised. He shall hear from me, Mr. Pickwick.
---------------
and down, 'you--you ought to be ashamed of yourself.'
---------------
and miserable countenance to be contemplating suicide. In the street,
---------------
umbrellas were the only things to be seen, and the clicking of pattens
---------------
and splashing of rain-drops were the only sounds to be heard. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
being to be had at the next stage, the dead certainty of its raining all
---------------
conveyance, so that it may be delivered the very first thing in the
---------------
The landlord smiled his delight. Nothing could be easier than for the
---------------
write outside, 'To be delivered immediately,' which was sure to
---------------
but would certainly be in London next day; until when he deferred any
---------------
If the excited and irritable populace knew I was here, I should be torn
---------------
* 'I should be the victim of their fury,' replied Pott. 'Now young man,
---------------
GAZETTE. I think I may venture to say that you would not be long in
---------------
that even if this be the fact, the Honourable Mr. Slumkey only appears
---------------
a Buff ball; which is to be held in a Buff town, in the very heart and
---------------
centre of a Buff population; which is to be conducted by a Buff master
---------------
of the ceremonies; which is to be attended by four ultra Buff members of
---------------
Parliament, and the admission to which, is to be by Buff tickets! Does
---------------
we pen the words, WE WILL BE THERE.'
---------------
remained there for the night, he could be furnished with the necessary
---------------
* 'It wouldn't be a bad notion to have a cigar by the kitchen fire, would
---------------
* 'It would be particularly comfortable, I think,' replied Mr. Pickwick.
---------------
juncture; still feigning to be absorbed in his reading. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'you will, perhaps, be somewhat repaid by a laugh at the style of this
---------------
* 'Nothing can be fairer,' observed Mr. Ben Allen. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
of the bag where a good thick hairbrush happened to be packed, caused a
---------------
sharp crash to be heard throughout the kitchen, and brought him at once
---------------
himself to be disarmed; and Mr. Weller, removing the extinguisher from
---------------
agoin as could be inwented your father had hopes as she vould have
---------------
the footman. Can't be helped now, can it, Mary?'
---------------
* 'I shan't be wery long avay,' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I shan't be avay more than a day, or two, Sir, at the furthest,' said
---------------
* 'As long as may be necessary, Sam,' replied Mr. Pickwick, 'you have my
---------------
* 'You will tell your father, Sam, that if I can be of any assistance to
---------------
him in his present situation, I shall be most willing and ready to lend
---------------
door, not one was to be seen; the place was silent and desolate. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'ooman vishes to be religious, she should begin vith dischargin' her
---------------
times, she should be wery careful not to con-wert this sort o' thing
---------------
situation in life so bad, Mr. Samuel, that it can't be mended. Which
---------------
'Wot a thing it is to be so sought arter!' observed Sam, smiling. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
men may not; 'cos a coachman may be on the wery amicablest terms with
---------------
to be married vether I vant to or not, and as at the same time I do
---------------
and fixters, vill be sold by private contract; and out o' the money, two
---------------
a little afore she died, vill be invested in your name in--What do you
---------------
to be inwested for you, Samivel, in the funs; four and a half per cent.
---------------
'The rest will be inwested in my name,' continued the elder Mr. Weller;
---------------
was impossible to foresee that the old gentleman would be so strongly
---------------
continues to be angry with us?'
---------------
prophesy that he will find some other friend who will not be backward in
---------------
business, and he would be glad to take him on your recommendation.'
---------------
only shows how one may be deceived. What do you think of his going to
---------------
the little attorney obstinately disregarded, 'you must be careful not
---------------
consequence of being too much sought after here, to be comfortable; and
---------------
me advise you, gentlemen, not to be too knowing in the West Indies. If
---------------
you throw away this chance, you will both richly deserve to be hanged,
---------------
should be imposed upon, and so wounded in his self-love, be real charity
---------------
of this action would be equally high.'
---------------
them to be here at half-past eleven, to settle that matter of yours,
---------------
especially as Messrs. Dodson & Fogg ought to be ashamed to look him
---------------
'I will not be put down, Sir,' replied Mr. Pickwick hastily. 'Mr.
---------------
he supposed he ought to be very angry, but he couldn't think of the
---------------
could be the smallest doubt of the fact. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'Very well,' replied Mr. Pickwick, 'and will be delighted to see you, I
---------------
as young as I used to be then, though not quite so light-hearted. "It's
---------------
* 'To be sure she is,' replied Wardle. 'She is at Osborne's Hotel in the
---------------
while Arabella and her pretty handmaid feigned to be absorbed in looking
---------------
favour must be in a manner connected with something to eat; and then
---------------
continuing to be cruel, that it wanted only half an hour of dinner when
---------------
'he is always exact. He will be here, in time, if he means to come; and
---------------
* 'Is nothing to be said to me?' cried Wardle, with open arms. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
afraid I shall be obliged to forbid you the house. People like you, who
---------------
get married in spite of everybody, ought not to be let loose on society.
---------------
Arabella, which the fat boy, considering as hints to be on his guard,
---------------
him; he's vicious; ring the bell, and let him be taken downstairs.'
---------------
It was a painful situation to be placed in; but he now regretted it
---------------
starved; and pray have your wine up at once, for you'll not be tolerable
---------------
vich, them arrangements is to be made as I told you on, last night,
---------------
* 'Vy not?' exclaimed Sam. ''Cos it must be proved, and probated, and
---------------
couple o' friends o' mine vith us, as'll be wery soon down upon him if
---------------
noble shape, and a nose, gentlemen, formed to command and be majestic.
---------------
whether any business was to be transacted, or whether he had been merely
---------------
It being decided by the committee that the five pound might be advanced,
---------------
ratifications of the same, and inventories to be made out, and lunches
---------------
to be taken, and dinners to be eaten, and so many profitable things to
---------------
resumed his father, 'that it vould be better to dewote the liquor to
---------------
confidence must be very gratifying to a professional man. I don't wish
---------------
I'm generally to be found here, gentlemen, but if I'm not here, or
---------------
recommending me to any of your friends, gentlemen, I shall be very much
---------------
again, feared it was time to be walking. Upon this hint Mr. Weller
---------------
business was to be transacted, and where Pell and Mr. Flasher left
---------------
could not be legally proceeded with, under the letter W., and in all
---------------
attachment and fidelity; let it be so, in Heaven's name. It is the fate
---------------
'it would be selfish and ungrateful. I ought to be happy to have an
---------------
gentleman's part, affected to be engaged in cutting the leaves of a book
---------------
ex-pressin' myself ven there's anythin' partickler to be done, and yet
---------------
put someveres, vere he knows it'll be safe, and I'm wery anxious too,
---------------
care on it, or to put it in vun o' the coach pockets, vich 'ud be a
---------------
shall be wery much obliged to you. P'raps,' said Mr. Weller, walking up
---------------
ran out of the room with a celerity scarcely to be expected from so
---------------
Sam saw that his master's injunctions were not to be disobeyed; and,
---------------
'Just the wery thing, to be sure,' said Mr. Weller, brightening up; 'o'
---------------
that she may be comfortable and prosperous. You understand?'
---------------
rayther alarmin'. Sammy must be careful.'
---------------
Pickwick's inclination, and that he would be very happy to yield to
---------------
livelihood for yourself and family. I shall be proud, Sam,' said Mr.
---------------
yourself; but it can't be done.'
---------------
'Can't be done!' ejaculated Mr. Pickwick in astonishment. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I say it can't be done,' repeated Sam in a louder key. 'Wot's to become
---------------
can't be done, Sir, it can't be done.'
---------------
have no reason to be ashamed of having this lady for my wife, nor you of
---------------
no new journeys were to be undertaken. At length, when the brains of
---------------
that his daughter should be married from my new house, on the day I take
---------------
harm, and that none of my adventures will be other than a source of
---------------
* There were few preparatory arrangements to be made for the marriage of
---------------
but being promptly revived, ordered the brocaded silk gown to be packed
---------------
* Mrs. Trundle had to be informed of all the mighty preparations that were
---------------
thereof through Mr. Trundle, lest the news should be too much for her;
---------------
with great attention sending in half a dozen of medicine, to be drunk
---------------
may still be frequently seen, contemplating the pictures in the Dulwich
---------------
* It can be seen in many a large hotel-proprietor
---------------
whose one ambition is to be a small peasant. It can be seen in many a
---------------
particular morning he was observed by his family to be unusually
---------------
the shape; for it continued, roughly speaking, to be both round and
---------------
science can't be expounded, because it's something more than just
---------------
natural science. They say your secret's not to be divulged, as being
---------------
* "I don't exactly know how it's to be helped," said Mr. Chace humorously.
---------------
Brown, "I had thought out exactly how a thing like that could be done,
---------------
which may be seen later from other angles and in other moods than his
---------------
always supposed to be wrong. After all, people don't write stories in
---------------
which hairdressers can't cut hair and have to be helped by a customer;
---------------
* "He may be right," answered the other; "but I mean a collective rule.
---------------
but it's got to be tried."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
to be the long, black legs of a figure fallen head downwards into the
---------------
* There was, indeed, another shadowy figure beginning to be visible
---------------
livery. He appeared to be making with unobtrusive haste towards a side-
---------------
the briefest examination proved him to be dead) lay with his head in the
---------------
evening-dress, and his long, black legs, so thin as to be almost
---------------
some extent under suspicion. Of course, he may be innocent; but he did
---------------
colourless voice. "But, of course, I may be wrong."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
to be almost the only person who did. All the best people seem to get
---------------
couldn't be home for hours, and gave that as his excuse for slipping
---------------
make him out. He seems to be scared of something."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
into the rest of the house. At the other end of it could be seen the
---------------
would be shut, but it's left on the latch."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
than to know any. His opinions seemed to be of a nihilistic and
---------------
impression that the case must be taken seriously. (Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
place without possible exit, when it would obviously be much more
---------------
for the guardians of law, he will be murdered, and he will not know the
---------------
reason. Half the decent people in this court will be butchered in their
---------------
limit and that the prosecutor in a murder case oughtn't to be so
---------------
They would think he must be rather eccentric; but he isn't at all
---------------
priest has to be more charitable than a poet. Lord have mercy on us, if
---------------
Surely, he would be more likely to retreat into the house? His gun was
---------------
Gwynne wasn't there to be fired at. The criminal was alone in the hall."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
suspects in this case must be innocent. Not one of them could possibly
---------------
* He seemed to be gazing into vacancy for a moment, and then added:
---------------
* "Well, we believe murderers can be pretty well classified," observed
---------------
exhaustive. First, all killing can be divided into rational and
---------------
worthy to be turned into legend and not merely into news. He was far too
---------------
capable a burglar to be a murderer. But his terrific strength and the
---------------
also thin and dark and supposed to be psychic--at any rate, by herself;
---------------
turn will be well advised not to materialize as members of a large
---------------
seemed to be always in the act of selling one car and buying another;
---------------
* "How frightful," cried Mrs. Bankes. "He must be quite a new-comer; but
---------------
gracious, but looked rather grim. "I'm afraid I shall be too busy for
---------------
"Your bees must be very busy if they keep you at it all night. I was
---------------
you'd be kind enough to give some-of my friends a run, if you want a
---------------
* "But think what fun it will be for your sister to see you arrive in a
---------------
car!" cried Carver. "You really ought to go. Don't be so selfish."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "I must be going," said Devine. "We must not interrupt the busy bee. I'm
---------------
the order and ornament that is just recent enough to be recognized as
---------------
windows, to be found in the buildings of its period. As she came to
---------------
* "There's no need to be distressed about that," he said. "It often
---------------
happens. Most of the ghosts aren't ghosts, and the few that may be won't
---------------
something that may be of some moment to you. I should not have added
---------------
of John Bankes, from what appeared to be an abortive expedition in the
---------------
* After a pause, he continued: "I can claim to be one of the more useful,
---------------
was only a hiding-place for me. Why shouldn't it be a hiding-place
---------------
joy ride. Searching his house, I found some curious things to be owned
---------------
concerns this house, and must be my excuse for intruding to-night. I
---------------
almost too deafening to be distinguishable as words; yet it was enough
---------------
was defiantly brandishing a revolver, and hoped there would be no need
---------------
adventures, to be shot almost by accident by a stockbroker in a suburban
---------------
* "There will have to be an inquest, of course," said Carver, gravely.
---------------
"But I think there will be nothing for you to worry about. There's a
---------------
good to be near so good a man. And when I saw him lying there dead in
---------------
ever a man went straight to heaven, it might be he."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
world heard that assurance: 'This night shalt thou be with Me in
---------------
be able to tell you the whole tiling. It may already be settled for me,
---------------
know how you knew, or even what there was to be known."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
social types or trades. Any man can be a murderer like poor John; any
---------------
man, even the same man, can be a saint like poor Michael. But if there
---------------
is one type that tends at times to be more utterly godless than another,
---------------
and one joke. It might be considered a mild joke, for it consisted
---------------
showed it to be a huge bubble of beautifully blown Venetian glass, very
---------------
yellow to be English."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "He thinks the more," said the housekeeper. "He may not be exactly a
---------------
foreigner tended more and more to be the central figure. It was not that
---------------
could be seen the crooked curves and burning colours of countless
---------------
Varney, who was reported to be an invalid, and certainly was never seen
---------------
great deal can be done with hypnotism and suggestion, to say nothing of
---------------
* "Can't all that be explained by telepathy?" asked the doctor sharply.
---------------
* "Well," said old Smart cheerfully, "I don't profess to be an authority
---------------
all the supernatural acts we have yet heard of seem to be thefts. And
---------------
* "Something might be done with music," murmured the Count dreamily. "It
---------------
would be better than all these words."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
will be quite safe then. Not that I suppose anything could possibly
---------------
* He did not see why there should be any
---------------
everything when the light in the east has ceased to be localized, lifted
---------------
friend ought to be asked."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Much better be telephoning the police at once," answered Boyle. "They
---------------
in our nightgowns. But it may be there are things even the police cars
---------------
soothe the inspector to be told by a foreign Count--in a soft, purring
---------------
to the village on purpose to buy the goldfish, might be excused for
---------------
being a little testy on learning they were not there to be bought. But,
---------------
the house he stands outside, it might perhaps be called an example of
---------------
* "And it might be called an example of what I said," said the doctor
---------------
nettles and thistles. What a pity that what was supposed to be a sort of
---------------
pause. "A thing can sometimes be too close to be seen, as, for instance,
---------------
* "I was saying that a man may be in the mood to look for something very
---------------
close to you to be seen."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Jameson did not expect the doors to be barred," said Father Brown. "He
---------------
employer, could go on saying for days that something ought to be done,
---------------
or might as well be done. But if you convey to a woman that something
---------------
ought to be done, there is always a dreadful danger that she will
---------------
leaning up against the wall to be festooned with cobwebs or nibbled by
---------------
strange world behind the scenes; but it was big enough to be serious.
---------------
undertaken to act an important part in the play that was to be rehearsed
---------------
* If it be possible for a heavy and healthy man to look haggard, he looked
---------------
moustache that was just too short to be bitten. He might have been a man
---------------
on a hat peg, I really thought perhaps he'd better be here. Jarvis has
---------------
he should be called in to consider the queer conduct of one of his
---------------
flock, whether she was to be regarded as a black sheep or only as a lost
---------------
gave her what ought to be the best part. It's supposed to be what stage
---------------
* "It would be devilish awkward to alter the parts now, anyhow," said
---------------
* "It's not to be thought of," declared Norman Knight firmly. "Why, I
---------------
and weltschmerz, I should be all for breaking the door down. These
---------------
* "The School for Scandal," said Mandeville. "It may be literature, but I
---------------
who happened, indeed, to be a friend and person of a similar persuasion,
---------------
* "Mrs. Mandeville seems to be an intelligent woman," said the priest to
---------------
Might be a bit funny. Somehow, nowadays, one can never find a thing
---------------
thought he was alone; and what's more, when I myself happened to be able
---------------
can't be a ghost. And I don't believe she's even an ordinary 'affair'. I
---------------
bluffing as well as blackmailing. She may be mad. These theatrical
---------------
people often have monomaniacs running after them. You may be right, but
---------------
The door seemed to be still closed; and. Mrs. Sands sat grimly outside
---------------
the curtain went up-Must be there still, for I ain't seen him come
---------------
booming voice of the actor on the stage could indeed be heard rolling
---------------
serious?" After a moment he added: "I may be able to push back the bolt;
---------------
quite well; that she is pretty superstitious. She wouldn't be likely to
---------------
is under the ground floor; but it might be a skylight or a window
---------------
opening on an area. But there don't seem to be any skylights or areas
---------------
* When it was fated that the theatre should be turned into a house of
---------------
general common-sense corroboration that the act had to be gone through
---------------
We certainly might be accused of the crime, especially as we found the
---------------
body. There seems nobody else who can be accused. You didn't happen to
---------------
all charitably suppose that she must be somebody else. But I don't see
---------------
* "Well, it can't be very nice to elope with a murderess," said the other
---------------
enough to be wrong about her. But I knew the sort of person she was five
---------------
for she may be too clever for you. Don't look at the men round her, for
---------------
they may be too silly about her. But look at some other woman who is
---------------
costume at that particular hour and she had it. It may be worth
---------------
scene. She may be wicked; but she isn't a witch."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Well, I wouldn't be so sure," said Father Brown, with a smile. "But she
---------------
is not seen. She is technically 'on,' but she might practically be very
---------------
difficulties, of course, but I think they could all be met in time and
---------------
* "I hope so," replied his companion; "for really it would be the most
---------------
the problem. The hamlet could not be called a village; indeed, it was
---------------
his secretary, and John Dalmon, who was generally supposed to be engaged
---------------
to be puzzled, and Sybil Rye, the lady of the household, began to be
---------------
stumpy figure could be seen pacing the garden path where the garden was
---------------
* "I should be very glad to hear your views," said the little priest
---------------
gentleman to be up so early; but he had a look at once robust and
---------------
seemed to be still young, but his black hair had gone prematurely grey
---------------
* "You must be the judge," said Father Brown gravely. "What is the matter
---------------
She admitted that her repulsion might be morbid; she confessed it like a
---------------
certain tales of virgin martyrs; only the shy can be so shameless for
---------------
evidence. But I warn you to be prepared."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
of course, a butcher would be an ideal performer with a large carving-
---------------
ladies, and then a refreshment shop run by a man who happens to be in
---------------
* "I know you had," be said. "You hated him; and that's how I know you
---------------
not even be alarmed at the razor and the hand. He died smiling at his
---------------
enough to acquit him. A little nervous fellow like that would be the
---------------
would be the first man to fear that he would be accused of having done
---------------
* The priest still seemed to be in a sort of trance, like a man staring
---------------
question you asked just now--why should the blackmailer be the murderer?
---------------
both nonsensical. One is, that rich men never want to be richer; the
---------------
other is, that a man can only be blackmailed for money. It's the last
---------------
to be a sort of saint. But Vaudrey had turned it all to poisonous pride;
---------------
revenge. . . . Oh, my God! he liked his revenges to be appropriate and
---------------
how the tool was to be broken and thrown away. He came upon certain
---------------
about those highly modern pictorial designs. He would indeed be of an
---------------
called bobbed, but too loose to be called anything else. She had a
---------------
of his niece would be an agreeable contrast. Yet he continued to gaze,
---------------
appearance of anybody would be an agreeable contrast It was therefore
---------------
secret, though they say be does hide himself in a castle. Isn't he the
---------------
* "You know," she said, "that she wants me to be engaged to Captain
---------------
seems to be quite a fashionable topic."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
the ceiling; but his eyes seemed to be turned inwards, and he laughed so
---------------
"You mustn't be hasty in a case of this sort," he began. "There are two
---------------
her that could not be heard. She did not answer; but they turned away
---------------
all the same. Please do; I shan't want it. I--I have to be in London for
---------------
would be a great relief to my mind if I could go."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
"Oh, I can't stand these stick-in-the-mud ways! Why, it'd be less
---------------
large fireplace. In another long room beyond could be seen, through the
---------------
under-statement to say that he might. Will you be good enough to step
---------------
* "And we shall be only too glad," said the solicitor, "to convey such a
---------------
* "What would be the use of my going after him?" asked the other. There's
---------------
and a great walker, and could often be seen stumping through the
---------------
can safely be allowed even to know the joke. The joke is enough in
---------------
* There was another silence, but this time the silence seemed to be rather
---------------
later be nothing but a skeleton in fourteenth-century armour, a thing
---------------
very likely to be found in the moat of an old Border castle. It was
---------------
that would soon be all they would find. And I got some confirmation of
---------------
jump. He would be an even less graceful jumper than I was. Yet, if the
---------------
* "They happened to be almost exactly alike," said the priest. "You could
---------------
answer to what would soon be the greatest difficulty of all?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* Father Brown seemed to be a little bemused, and went on in a more
---------------
divine help to be had within; perhaps they merely implied that the ideal
---------------
prove, on examination, to be every bit as knobbly as Shakespeare's.
---------------
promising politician; who seemed in society to be interested in
---------------
everything except politics. It may be answered gloomily that every
---------------
a hurry when he heard the Master was to be here, I believe. He'd have
---------------
to be operated on? I confess I am full of curiosity."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "I should be delighted to see the collection," said Hardcastle quietly,
---------------
for the truths supposed to be symbolized in them than for their value in
---------------
monetary sense, he seemed to be much more interested in its name than in
---------------
asked to be allowed to look at the stone; and as evening was closing in,
---------------
on these again could be traced the lines and colours of Asiatic dragons
---------------
* "Now, don't tell me you're going to be silly," said Lady Mounteagle.
---------------
only got to search him. The thing must be here."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "It must be somewhere," said Hunter. "Have you searched the fountain and
---------------
* "You must be very strong," said the priest pleasantly. "You held him
---------------
whatever. He seemed to be laughing, in a still unfathomable fashion at
---------------
* "If you were to be utterly, unfathomably, silent, do you think you might
---------------
faces in the same direction; and on every face there seemed to be the
---------------
smiling rather nervously. "There cannot be the least doubt it is as you
---------------
* "We seem to be back among the mystics again. Look here, I'm a practical
---------------
having apparently wasted a lot of his life on proving it to be nonsense.
---------------
one creed will be callous, where the worst man of another will be
---------------
wouldn't be specially his temptation to take jewels; but it would be his
---------------
opposite shame. We should all be anxious that nobody should think we had
---------------
Look at old Mounteagle himself, for instance! Ah, you may be as Eastern
---------------
* "We mustn't be too hard on either of them," said Father Brown. "Other
---------------
can be really called gold; and had the look of being younger than his
---------------
storm's coming nearer. A tree is not supposed to be a good umbrella for
---------------
get shelter anywhere? There seems to be a house over there."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "It's curious," said his wife sadly, "that we should be caught in a
---------------
seem to be all sorts of weird stories about why he hides himself like
---------------
into a tragedy. His whole life seemed to be in that idolatry, and one
---------------
think we'd better be moving back to the car."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
atmosphere of attention seemed to be created with the mention of the
---------------
people like you and the general, it might be only a private matter; but
---------------
don't see why even a religious maniac should be that particular sort of
---------------
* "First, it was stated that James Mair was engaged to be married, but
---------------
if it occurred to the lady that there might be another meaning to that
---------------
could be brought here in no time; but there's no need to bring him here
---------------
* That seemed to be all over, like the noise that wakes a man up.
---------------
would think it would be done for the sake of appearances. Anyhow, when
---------------
the thing was all over, it would be natural for the second to stir long
---------------
* "You are right," said the priest, "and it shall be counted to you."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
for hiding might not only be concerned with what lie was, but with who
---------------
* "He ought to be lynched," cried Cockspur excitedly. "He ought to burn
---------------
forgive because there isn't anything to be forgiven."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "But, hang it all," cried Mallow, "you don't expect us to be able to
---------------
* "No," said the priest; "but we have to be able to pardon it."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
imagine the state of mind in which such a thing would be done, I always
---------------
if you think what it would really be like to be a revolutionary poet.
---------------
Now I set myself conscientiously down to be a revolutionary poet. I mean
---------------
one thing to be said; it must be an interesting experience." Then he
---------------
it might sometimes be a painful duty. It's an uncommonly base pleasure.
---------------
quite a wild effort of imagination to be so conventional. To want one
---------------
interest. It must be confessed that there did flash once beneath his
---------------
really be the monster and murderer he had beheld for that blinding and
---------------
something like an eruption of Vesuvius; but that would not really be so
---------------
would be a good deal too favourable to him. Apparently you would start
---------------
think that the practical effect would be that no criminal would ever
---------------
* There was an instant of profound stillness, in which could be faintly
---------------
for some considerable period; and I should be pretty much pained to
---------------
circumstances; it would be a damned sight better to be a dirty informer
---------------
aaicutb
= ain't all it's cracked up to be , aaicutb ,
---------------
all questions must be answered
= bisogna rispondere a tutte le domande ,
---------------
all will be revealed
= tutto sarà rivelato ,
---------------
although he claims to be shy
= benché sostenga di essere timido ,
---------------
although she claims to be shy
= benché sostenga di essere timida ,
---------------
an early reply would be appreciated
= una pronta risposta sarà gradita ,
---------------
an early reply would be greatly appreciated
= vi saremmo grati se voleste risponderci con sollecitudine ,
---------------
and be quick about it
= e fai alla svelta! ,
---------------
any complaints should be addressed to
= i reclami devo essere sporti a ,
---------------
any more stealing and you'll be in big trouble
= se continui a rubare avrai dei grossi guai , ruba ancora una volta e avrai grossi guai ,
---------------
any pupil caught smoking will be punished
= gli alunni sorpresi a fumare saranno puniti ,
---------------
appear to be
= sembrar essere ,
---------------
appear to be crying
= sembrar piangere ,
---------------
appearances can be deceptive
= l'apparenza inganna ,
---------------
appeared to be
= sembrato essere ,
---------------
appeared to be crying
= sembrato piangere ,
---------------
appearing to be
= sembrando essere ,
---------------
appearing to be crying
= sembrando piangere ,
---------------
appears to be
= sembra essere ,
---------------
appears to be crying
= sembra piangere ,
---------------
applied to be trasferred
= chiesto di essere trasferito , fatto domanda di trasferimento ,
---------------
applies to be trasferred
= chiede di essere trasferito , fa domanda di trasferimento ,
---------------
apply to be trasferred
= chiedere di essere trasferito , fare domanda di trasferimento ,
---------------
applying to be trasferred
= chiedendo di essere trasferito , facendo domanda di trasferimento ,
---------------
arrange for the goods to be delivered
= provvedere alla consegna della merce ,
---------------
arranged for the goods to be delivered
= provveduto alla consegna della merce ,
---------------
arranges for the goods to be delivered
= provvede alla consegna della merce ,
---------------
arranging for the goods to be delivered
= provvedendo alla consegna della merce ,
---------------
as sure as can be
= senza dubbio , di sicuro ,
---------------
assuming that to be true
= supponendo che ciò sia vero ,
---------------
be
= essere , stare , esistere , avvenire , costare , diventare , significare , lettera bi , below or equal , bank of england , be ,
---------------
be or not to be
= essere o non essere ,
---------------
before long it will be autumn
= presto sarà autunno ,
---------------
before long it will be spring
= presto sarà primavera ,
---------------
before long it will be summer
= presto sarà estate ,
---------------
before long it will be winter
= presto sarà inverno ,
---------------
beg to be chosen
= chiedere di essere scelti ,
---------------
beggar can't be choosers
= mangia questa finestra o salta dalla finestra , a caval donato non si guarda in bocca ,
---------------
beggars can't be choosers
= o mangi questa minestra o salti dalla finestra ,
---------------
begged to be chosen
= chiesto di essere scelti ,
---------------
begging to be chosen
= chiedendo di essere scelti ,
---------------
begs to be chosen
= chiede di essere scelto ,
---------------
believe oneself to be
= credersi ,
---------------
believe to be false
= credere falso ,
---------------
believe to be true
= credere vero ,
---------------
believed oneself to be
= credutosi ,
---------------
believed to be false
= creduto falso ,
---------------
believed to be true
= creduto vero ,
---------------
believes oneself to be
= si crede ,
---------------
believes to be false
= crede falso ,
---------------
believes to be true
= crede vero ,
---------------
believing oneself to be
= credendosi ,
---------------
believing to be false
= credendo falso ,
---------------
believing to be true
= credendo vero ,
---------------
beware lest you be received
= badate di non farvi imbrogliare ,
---------------
bootleggers will be prosecuted
= i contrabbandieri di liquori saranno perseguiti a termine di legge ,
---------------
born to be hanged
= faccia da forca ,
---------------
boys will be boys
= i ragazzi sono ragazzi , i ragazzi non possono comportarsi che da ragazzi ,
---------------
can i be of assistance
= posso esserle d'aiuto? posso rendermi utile? ,
---------------
can i be of service to you
= posso esserle utile? posso fare qualcosa per lei? ,
---------------
can i be of use to you
= posso esserti utile? posso esservi utile? ,
---------------
can it be true
= possibile che sia vero? ,
---------------
can you arrange to be back at ten
= puoi fare in modo d'essere di ritorno alle dieci? ,
---------------
can you think of anyplace he might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anyplace she might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anywhere he might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anywhere she might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
cast not a clout till may be out
= aprile non ti scoprire ,
---------------
cheque to be credited
= assegno per accreditamento ,
---------------
cheques to be credited
= assegni per accreditamento ,
---------------
clever as you may be
= per quanto bravo ,
---------------
destined to be unhappy
= destinato all'infelicità ,
---------------
direction to be followed
= senso obbligatorio ,
---------------
directions to be followed
= sensi obbligatori ,
---------------
do unto others as you would be done by
= fai agli altri quel che vorresti fosse fatto a te ,
---------------
don't be a bitch
= non fare la strega! ,
---------------
don't be afraid so-and-so may laugh at you
= non temere che qualcuno rida di te ,
---------------
don't be alarmed
= non allarmatevi! ,
---------------
don't be frightened
= non aver paura ,
---------------
don't be horrid
= non fare l'antipatico! ,
---------------
don't be longer than you can help
= non star via più del necessario ,
---------------
don't be puffed up
= non gonfiarti di boria ,
---------------
don't be rude to me
= non essere villano con me! ,
---------------
don't be ruled by envy
= non lasciarti dominare dall'invidia ,
---------------
don't be silly
= non essere ridicolo! non dire scemenze! non fare lo stupido! ,
---------------
don't be so all-fired sure about it
= non esserne così sicuro ,
---------------
don't be so careless with your money
= non essere così sconsiderato nell'uso del tuo denaro ,
---------------
don't be so mean to your little brother
= non essere così cattivo con il tuo fratellino, non essere così sgarbato con il tuo fratellino ,
---------------
don't be so mean to your little sister
= non essere così cattivo con la tua sorellina, non essere così sgarbato con la tua sorellina ,
---------------
don't be so mindless of your duties
= non essere così noncurante dei tuoi doveri! ,
---------------
don't be so sad
= non essere così triste! ,
---------------
don't be such a baby
= non fare il bambino! ,
---------------
don't be to hard on
= non essere troppo duro con ,
---------------
don't be to hard on your son
= non essere troppo duro con tuo figlio ,
---------------
don't be uneasy on my behalf
= non agitatevi per me ,
---------------
don't be unsteady
= non essere incostante! non essere irresoluto! ,
---------------
easter will soon be round again
= la pasqua tornerà presto, presto sarà di nuovo pasqua ,
---------------
even if we allow that his theory might be correct
= pur ammettendo che la sua teoria possa essere corretta ,
---------------
everybody who is anybody will be
= ci saranno tutte le persone che contano, ci saranno tutte le persone importanti ,
---------------
he always has to be different
= deve sempre distinguersi,
---------------
he appears to be better
= sembra stia meglio,
---------------
he is believed to be a spy
= è ritenuto una spia,
---------------
he is believed to be dead
= lo si crede morto,
---------------
he is not to be denied
= non gli si può dire di no,
---------------
he needs to be left alone
= ha bisogno di essere lasciato in pace,
---------------
he'll be along shortly
= sarà qui tra poco,
---------------
jesus knew who his betrayer would be
= gesù sapeva chi l'avrebbe tradito,
---------------
justice must not be denied to anyone
= non si deve rifiutare di rendere giustizia a nessuno,
---------------
i allowed myself to be persuaded
= mi sono lasciato persuadere,
---------------
i am where i should be
= io sono al mio posto!,
---------------
i believe her to be right
= credo che abbia ragione,
---------------
i believe him to be right
= credo che abbia ragione,
---------------
i don't want to be around when
= non voglio esserci quando,
---------------
i don't want to be dictated to
= non voglio essere comandato,
---------------
i just happened to be around
= mi trovavo lì per caso,
---------------
i must be getting ancient
= sto proprio diventando vecchio,
---------------
i must be off
= devo andare,
---------------
i shall be charmed to meet
= sarò felice di conoscerla, sarò felice di vederla,
---------------
i'll be along in a second
= ti raggiungo tra un attimo,
---------------
i'll be around in a minute
= arrivo lì tra un minuto, sarò lì tra un minuto,
---------------
i'll be back directly
= sarò di ritorno fra breve,
---------------
i'll be back in a minute
= torno subito,
---------------
i'll be black
= prendo i neri ,
---------------
i'll be bound
= garantisco, giurerei,
---------------
i'll be buggered
= sia dannato se,
---------------
i'm glad i won't be around when
= sono contento che non ci sarò quando,
---------------
i'm not as young as i used to be
= non ho più vent'anni,
---------------
if he's to be believed
= stando a quanto dice,
---------------
if she's to be believed
= stando a quanto dice,
---------------
is there anything more to be said
= c'è qualcos'altro da aggiungere?,
---------------
is there anything to be done
= c'è qualcosa da fare?,
---------------
it better be
= sarà meglio! ,
---------------
it better had be
= sarà meglio! ,
---------------
it could be argued that
= si potrebbe sostenere che,
---------------
it couldn't be better
= non potrebbe essere migliore, non potrebbero essere migliori,
---------------
it couldn't be helped
= non c'era nulla da fare, era inevitabile,
---------------
it had better be
= sarà meglio! ,
---------------
it has to be seen to be believed
= bisogna vederlo per crederci,
---------------
it will be a hard act to follow
= sarà difficile da eguagliare,
---------------
it will be curtain for
= sarà la fine per,
---------------
it will be sold to the highest bidder
= sarà venduto al migliore offerente,
---------------
it would be a crime
= sarebbe un delitto, sarebbe un crimine,
---------------
it would be assuming
= sarebbe presuntuoso,
---------------
it would be best if he did
= sarebbe meglio se facesse,
---------------
it would be best if she did
= sarebbe meglio se facesse,
---------------
it would be best if you did
= sarebbe meglio se facessi,
---------------
it would be best to do
= la cosa migliore sarebbe fare,
---------------
it wouldn't be a bad idea to
= non sarebbe una cattiva idea,
---------------
it'll be ages yet before
= passeranno dei secoli prima,
---------------
it's good to be alive
= sono contento di essere al mondo!,
---------------
it's great to be alive
= sono contento di essere al mondo!,
---------------
it's not all it should be
= lascia a desiderare, non è il massimo, non è un granché,
---------------
it's not all that it should be
= lascia a desiderare, non è il massimo, non è un granché,
---------------
it's nothing to be ashamed of
= non c'è nulla di cui vergognarsi,
---------------
leave him be
= lascialo stare,
---------------
leave much to be desidered
= lasciare molto a desiderare,
---------------
leaves much to be desidered
= lascia molto a desiderare,
---------------
leaving much to be desidered
= lasciando molto a desiderare,
---------------
left much to be desidered
= lasciato molto a desiderare,
---------------
let bygones be bygones
= mettiamoci una pietra sopra, acqua passata non macina più,
---------------
let him be
= lascialo stare,
---------------
let me be
= lasciami stare! lasciami in pace!,
---------------
let your communication be yea yea nay nay
= siano le vostre risposte se sì sì se no no,
---------------
let's be down to earth
= stiamo con i piedi per terra!,
---------------
ndef
= not to be defined, ndef,
---------------
no better than one should be
= di facili costumi, una poco di buono,
---------------
nobody seems to be biting
= sembra che nessuno abbocchi, non sembra abboccare nessuno,
---------------
not as young as one used to be
= non più giovane, avanti negli anni,
---------------
not as young as one was to be
= non più giovane, avanti negli anni,
---------------
not so young as one used to be
= non più giovane, avanti negli anni,
---------------
not so young as one was to be
= non più giovane, avanti negli anni,
---------------
not to be worth a bean
= non valere un fico secco,
---------------
not to be worth one's salt
= non valere il pane che si mangia, non valere nulla,
---------------
she always has to be different
= deve sempre distinguersi ,
---------------
she is believed to be a spy
= è ritenuta una spia ,
---------------
she is believed to be dead
= la si crede morta ,
---------------
she is not to be denied
= non le si può dire di no ,
---------------
she needs to be left alone
= ha bisogno di essere lasciata in pace ,
---------------
she'll be along shortly
= sarà qui tra poco ,
---------------
so be it
= così sia , e sia ,
---------------
that can be balanced
= pareggiabile ,
---------------
the best thing would be to do
= la cosa migliore sarebbe fare ,
---------------
the bill is to be made out to
= la fattura deve essere intestata a ,
---------------
the money would be better spent on
= sarebbe meglio spendere il denaro per ,
---------------
the train may easily be late
= è facile che il treno sia in ritardo ,
---------------
there appears to be
= sembra che ci sia ,
---------------
there would appear to be
= sembrerebbe che ci sia ,
---------------
there'll be another bus along
= passerà un altro autobus ,
---------------
there'll be another bus along in half an hour
= passerà un altro autobus tra mezz'ora ,
---------------
there'll be the deuce to pay
= ci saranno un sacco di guai ,
---------------
they could be dead for all the difference it would make
= potrebbero anche essere morti , per quello che importa! ,
---------------
this may be the start of something big
= questo può essere l'inizio di qualcosa di importante ,
---------------
this may not be a bad opportunity to
= questa potrebbe essere una buona occasione per , questo potrebbe non essere un brutto momento per ,
---------------
to be a-building
= essere in costruzione ,
---------------
to be arranged
= da stabilire ,
---------------
to be continued
= il seguito alla prossima puntata , continua ,
---------------
to be discussed
= trattabile ,
---------------
to be drunk on the premises
= da bersi sul luogo , non da asportare ,
---------------
to be fair
= in effetti , effettivamente , a dire il vero ,
---------------
to be frank
= in effetti , effettivamente , a dire il vero ,
---------------
to be or not to be
= essere o non essere ,
---------------
to be rendered
= a rendere ,
---------------
to be serious
= in effetti , effettivamente , a dire il vero ,
---------------
to be sold
= da vendere , in vendita ,
---------------
to be sure
= certo , in verità , certo che sì! altro che! eccome ,
---------------
try to be on your best behavior
= cercate di comportarvi bene ,
---------------
try to be on your best behaviour
= cercate di comportarvi bene ,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - scoraggiare
Ausiliare:avere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io scoraggio
tu scoraggi
egli scoraggia
noi scoraggiamo
voi scoraggiate
essi scoraggiano
Imperfetto
io scoraggiavo
tu scoraggiavi
egli scoraggiava
noi scoraggiavamo
voi scoraggiavate
essi scoraggiavano
Passato remoto
io scoraggiai
tu scoraggiasti
egli scoraggiò
noi scoraggiammo
voi scoraggiaste
essi scoraggiarono
Passato prossimo
io ho scoraggiato
tu hai scoraggiato
egli ha scoraggiato
noi abbiamo scoraggiato
voi avete scoraggiato
essi hanno scoraggiato
Trapassato prossimo
io avevo scoraggiato
tu avevi scoraggiato
egli aveva scoraggiato
noi avevamo scoraggiato
voi avevate scoraggiato
essi avevano scoraggiato
Trapassato remoto
io ebbi scoraggiato
tu avesti scoraggiato
egli ebbe scoraggiato
noi avemmo scoraggiato
voi eveste scoraggiato
essi ebbero scoraggiato
Futuro semplice
io scoraggerò
tu scoraggerai
egli scoraggerà
noi scoraggeremo
voi scoraggerete
essi scoraggeranno
Futuro anteriore
io avrò scoraggiato
tu avrai scoraggiato
egli avrà scoraggiato
noi avremo scoraggiato
voi avrete scoraggiato
essi avranno scoraggiato
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io scoraggi
che tu scoraggi
che egli scoraggi
che noi scoraggiamo
che voi scoraggiate
che essi scoraggino
Passato
che io abbia scoraggiato
che tu abbia scoraggiato
che egli abbia scoraggiato
che noi abbiamo scoraggiato
che voi abbiate scoraggiato
che essi abbiano scoraggiato
Imperfetto
che io scoraggiassi
che tu scoraggiassi
che egli scoraggiasse
che noi scoraggiassimo
che voi scoraggiaste
che essi scoraggiassero
Trapassato
che io avessi scoraggiato
che tu avessi scoraggiato
che egli avesse scoraggiato
che noi avessimo scoraggiato
che voi aveste scoraggiato
che essi avessero scoraggiato
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io scoraggerei
tu scoraggeresti
egli scoraggerebbe
noi scoraggeremmo
voi scoraggereste
essi scoraggerebbero
Passato
io avrei scoraggiato
tu avresti scoraggiato
egli avrebbe scoraggiato
noi avremmo scoraggiato
voi avreste scoraggiato
essi avrebbero scoraggiato
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
scoraggia
scoraggi
scoraggiamo
scoraggiate
scoraggino
Futuro
-
scoraggerai
scoraggerà
scoraggeremo
scoraggerete
scoraggeranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
scoraggiar
Passato
essersi scoraggiato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
scoraggiante
Passato
scoraggiato
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
scoraggiando
Passato
avendo scoraggiato
Verb: to be-was-been
Ausiliar: to be - intransitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I am discouraged
you are discouraged
he/she/it is discouraged
we are discouraged
you are discouraged
they are discouraged
Simple past
I was discouraged
you were discouraged
he/she/it was discouraged
we were discouraged
you were discouraged
they were discouraged
Simple past
I was discouraged
you were discouraged
he/she/it was discouraged
we were discouraged
you were discouraged
they were discouraged
Present perfect
I have been discouraged
you have been discouraged
he/she/it has been discouraged
we have been discouraged
you have been discouraged
they have been discouraged
Past perfect
I had been discouraged
you had been discouraged
he/she/it had been discouraged
we had been discouraged
you had been discouraged
they had been discouraged
Past perfect
I had been discouraged
you had been discouraged
he/she/it had been discouraged
we had been discouraged
you had been discouraged
they had been discouraged
Simple future
I will be discouraged
you will be discouraged
he/she/it will be discouraged
we will be discouraged
you will be discouraged
they will be discouraged
Future perfect
I will have been discouraged
you will have been discouraged
he/she/it will have been discouraged
we will have been discouraged
you will have been discouraged
they will have been discouraged
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I be discouraged
That you be discouraged
That he/she/it be discouraged
That we be discouraged
That you be discouraged
That they be discouraged
Present perfect
That I have been discouraged
That you have been discouraged
That he/she/it have been discouraged
That we have been discouraged
That you have been discouraged
That they have been discouraged
Simple past
That I was discouraged
That you were discouraged
That he/she/it was discouraged
That we were discouraged
That you were discouraged
That they were discouraged
Past perfect
That I had been discouraged
That you had been discouraged
That he/she/it had been discouraged
That we had been discouraged
That you had been discouraged
That they had been discouraged
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would be discouraged
you would be discouraged
we would be discouraged
we would be discouraged
you would be discouraged
they would be discouraged
Past
I would have been
you would have been
he/she/it would have been
we would have been
you would have been
they would have been
Present continous
I would be being discouraged
you would be being discouraged
we would be being discouraged
we would be being discouraged
you would be being discouraged
they would be being discouraged
Past continous
I would have been being
you would have been being
he/she/it would have been being
we would have been being
you would have been being
they would have been being
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
-
be
let us be
be
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to be
Past
to have been
Present continous
to be being
Perfect continous
to have been being
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
being
Past
been
Perfect
having been
Affermative - GERUND
Present
being
Past
having been
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do am discouraged
you do are discouraged
he/she/it does is discouraged
we do are discouraged
you do are discouraged
they do are discouraged
Simple past
I did be discouraged
you did be discouraged
he/she/it did be discouraged
we did be discouraged
you did be discouraged
they did be discouraged
Simple past
I did be discouraged
you did be discouraged
he/she/it did be discouraged
we did be discouraged
you did be discouraged
they did be discouraged
Present perfect
I have not been discouraged
you have not been discouraged
he/she/it has not been discouraged
we have not been discouraged
you have not been discouraged
they have not been discouraged
Past perfect
I had not been discouraged
you had not been discouraged
he/she/it had not been discouraged
we had not been discouraged
you had not been discouraged
they had not been discouraged
Past perfect
I had not been discouraged
you had not been discouraged
he/she/it had not been discouraged
we had not been discouraged
you had not been discouraged
they had not been discouraged
Simple future
I will not be discouraged
you will not be discouraged
he/she/it will not be discouraged
we will not be discouraged
you will not be discouraged
they will not be discouraged
Future perfect
I will not have been discouraged
you will not have been discouraged
he/she/it will not have been discouraged
we will not have been discouraged
you will not have been discouraged
they will not have been discouraged
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do be discouraged
That you do be discouraged
That he/she/it does be discouraged
That we do be discouraged
That you do be discouraged
That they do be discouraged
Present perfect
That I have not been discouraged
That you have not been discouraged
That he/she/it have not been discouraged
That we have not been discouraged
That you have not been discouraged
That they have not been discouraged
Simple past
That I did be discouraged
That you did be discouraged
That he/she/it did be discouraged
That we did be discouraged
That you did be discouraged
That they did be discouraged
Past perfect
That I had not been discouraged
That you had not been discouraged
That he/she/it had not been discouraged
That we had not been discouraged
That you had not been discouraged
That they had not been discouraged
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not be discouraged
you would not be discouraged
we would not be discouraged
we would not be discouraged
you would not be discouraged
they would not be discouraged
Past
I would not have been
you would not have been
he/she/it would not have been
we would not have been
you would not have been
they would not have been
Present continous
I would not be being discouraged
you would not be being discouraged
we would not be being discouraged
we would not be being discouraged
you would not be being discouraged
they would not be being discouraged
Past continous
I would not have been being
you would not have been being
he/she/it would not have been being
we would not have been being
you would not have been being
they would not have been being
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
-
do not be
-
-
do not be
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to be
Past
not to have been
Present continous
not to be being
Perfect continous
not to have been being
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not being
Past
not been
Perfect
not having been
Negative - GERUND
Present
not being
Past
not having been
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do am discouraged?
do are discouraged?
does is discouraged?
do are discouraged?
do are discouraged?
do are discouraged?
Simple past
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
Simple past
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
did be discouraged?
Present perfect
have I been discouraged?
have you been discouraged?
has she/he/it been discouraged?
have we been discouraged?
have you been discouraged?
have they been discouraged?
Past perfect
had I been discouraged?
had you been discouraged?
had she/he/it been discouraged?
had we been discouraged?
had you been discouraged?
had they been discouraged?
Past perfect
had I been discouraged?
had you been discouraged?
had she/he/it been discouraged?
had we been discouraged?
had you been discouraged?
had they been discouraged?
Simple future
will I be discouraged?
will you be discouraged?
will she/he/it be discouraged?
will we be discouraged?
will you be discouraged?
will they be discouraged?
Future perfect
will I have been discouraged?
will you have been discouraged?
will she/he/it have been discouraged?
will we have been discouraged?
will you have been discouraged?
will they have been discouraged?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do be discouraged?
That do be discouraged?
That does be discouraged?
That do be discouraged?
That do be discouraged?
That do be discouraged?
Present perfect
That have I been discouraged?
That have you been discouraged?
That have she/he/it been discouraged?
That have we been discouraged?
That have you been discouraged?
That have they been discouraged?
Simple past
That did be discouraged?
That did be discouraged?
That did be discouraged?
That did be discouraged?
That did be discouraged?
That did be discouraged?
Past perfect
That had I been discouraged?
That had you been discouraged?
That had she/he/it been discouraged?
That had we been discouraged?
That had you been discouraged?
That had they been discouraged?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I be discouraged?
would you be discouraged?
would she/he/it be discouraged?
would we be discouraged?
would you be discouraged?
would they be discouraged?
Past
would I have been ?
would you have been ?
would she/he/it have been ?
would we have been ?
would you have been ?
would they have been ?
Present continous
would I be being discouraged?
would you be being discouraged?
would she/he/it be being discouraged?
would we be being discouraged?
would you be being discouraged?
would they be being discouraged?
Past continous
would I have been being ?
would you have been being ?
would she/he/it have been being ?
would we have been being ?
would you have been being ?
would they have been being ?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not am discouraged?
do you not are discouraged?
does she/he/it not is discouraged?
do we not are discouraged?
do you not are discouraged?
do they not are discouraged?
Simple past
did I not be discouraged?
did you not be discouraged?
did she/he/it not be discouraged?
did we not be discouraged?
did you not be discouraged?
did they not be discouraged?
Simple past
did I not be discouraged?
did you not be discouraged?
did she/he/it not be discouraged?
did we not be discouraged?
did you not be discouraged?
did they not be discouraged?
Present perfect
have I not been discouraged?
have you not been discouraged?
has she/he/it not been discouraged?
have we not been discouraged?
have you not been discouraged?
have they not been discouraged?
Past perfect
had I not been discouraged?
had you not been discouraged?
had she/he/it not been discouraged?
had we not been discouraged?
had you not been discouraged?
had they not been discouraged?
Past perfect
had I not been discouraged?
had you not been discouraged?
had she/he/it not been discouraged?
had we not been discouraged?
had you not been discouraged?
had they not been discouraged?
Simple future
will I not be discouraged?
will you not be discouraged?
will she/he/it not be discouraged?
will we not be discouraged?
will you not be discouraged?
will they not be discouraged?
Future perfect
will I not have been discouraged?
will you not have been discouraged?
will she/he/it not have been discouraged?
will we not have been discouraged?
will you not have been discouraged?
will they not have been discouraged?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not be discouraged?
That do you not be discouraged?
That does she/he/it not be discouraged?
That do we not be discouraged?
That do you not be discouraged?
That do they not be discouraged?
Present perfect
That have I not been discouraged?
That have you not been discouraged?
That have she/he/it not been discouraged?
That have we not been discouraged?
That have you not been discouraged?
That have they not been discouraged?
Simple past
That did I not be discouraged?
That did you not be discouraged?
That did she/he/it not be discouraged?
That did we not be discouraged?
That did you not be discouraged?
That did they not be discouraged?
Past perfect
That had I not been discouraged?
That had you not been discouraged?
That had she/he/it not been discouraged?
That had we not been discouraged?
That had you not been discouraged?
That had they not been discouraged?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not be discouraged?
would you not be discouraged?
would she/he/it not be discouraged?
would we not be discouraged?
would you not be discouraged?
would they not be discouraged?
Past
would I not have been ?
would you not have been ?
would she/he/it not have been ?
would we not have been ?
would you not have been ?
would they not have been ?
Present continous
would I not be being discouraged?
would you not be being discouraged?
would she/he/it not be being discouraged?
would we not be being discouraged?
would you not be being discouraged?
would they not be being discouraged?
Past continous
would I not have been being ?
would you not have been being ?
would she/he/it not have been being ?
would we not have been being ?
would you not have been being ?
would they not have been being ?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present