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Verbi e vocaboli Spagnolo

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sinonimi di couple
Cerca  frasi:
Italiano
Vocabolario e frasi
accoppiabile
= che si può accoppiare .
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accoppiato
= participio passato di accoppiare
= nei sign . del
= verbo rima accoppiata , la rima fra due versi consecutivi , detta anche rima baciata verso accoppiato , quello formato da due versi uguali divisi da una cesura .
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ammogliarsi
= verbo rifl. prendere moglie accoppiarsi
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apparigliare
= verbo trans. appaiare , mettere a pari , accostare accoppiare al tiro animali simili , spec . cavalli .
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appicciare
= verbo trans. accendere accoppiare , unire
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copulare
= verbo trans. accoppiare, congiungere operare una copulazione
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enogastronomia
= l'arte di saper accoppiare i vini ai cibi .
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monogamia
= istituto matrimoniale per cui un solo uomo può essere unito coniugalmente a una sola donna - tendenza degli individui di alcune specie animali ad accoppiarsi con un solo individuo di sesso diverso.
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mozzo
= parte centrale di un organo rotante, in genere di forma cilindrica, avente la funzione di accoppiare l'organo stesso al suo asse
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riaccoppiare
= verbo trans. accoppiare di nuovo
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riaccoppiarsi
= verbo riflessivo accoppiarsi di nuovo.
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succube
= o succubo , nella credenza medievale , demone che prendeva l'aspetto di donna per accoppiarsi durante la notte con gli uomini , persona che soggiace alla volontà altrui ,
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Inglese
Vocabolario e frasi
Jane was already so much recoveredas to intend leaving her room for a couple of hours that evening.<>
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Mr. Collins, awkward and solemn,apologising instead of attending, and often moving wrong without beingaware of it, gave her all the shame and misery which a disagreeablepartner for a couple of dances can give.<>
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Wherever you and Jane are knownyou must be respected and valued; and you will not appear to lessadvantage for having a couple of--or I may say, three--very sillysisters.<>
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But how little of permanent happiness couldbelong to a couple who were only brought together because their passionswere stronger than their virtue, she could easily conjecture.<>
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She wasgoing to the butcher's, she told me, on purpose to order in some meat onWednesday, and she has got three couple of ducks just fit to be killed.<>
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It is settled between us already, thatwe are to be the happiest couple in the world.<>
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The waiter withdrew, and the party were left toenjoy the cosy couple of hours succeeding dinner.<>
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An old woman and a couple of waiters werecleaning the coffee-room, and an officer in undress uniform was lookingout of the window.<>
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Therewere a couple of shelves, with a few plates and cups and saucers; anda pair of stage shoes and a couple of foils hung beneath them.<>
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Three or four buxom girls speedily dispersed in search of thedifferent articles in requisition, while a couple of large-headed,circular-visaged males rose from their seats in the chimney-corner (foralthough it was a May evening their attachment to the wood fire appearedas cordial as if it were Christmas), and dived into some obscurerecesses, from which they speedily produced a bottle of blacking, andsome half-dozen brushes.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The wickets were pitched, and so were a couple of marquees for therest and refreshment of the contending parties.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You had better step into the marquee, I think, Sir,' said one verystout gentleman, whose body and legs looked like half a gigantic roll offlannel, elevated on a couple of inflated pillow-cases.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) That insinuating gentleman sighed deeply, fixed his eyes on the spinsteraunt's face for a couple of minutes, started melodramatically, andsuddenly withdrew them.<>
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On the sideboard a variety of miscellaneous articleswere huddled together, the most conspicuous of which were some verycloudy fish-sauce cruets, a couple of driving-boxes, two or three whips,and as many travelling shawls, a tray of knives and forks, and themustard.<>
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It was a strange old place,built of a kind of shingle, inlaid, as it were, with cross-beams, withgabled-topped windows projecting completely over the pathway, and a lowdoor with a dark porch, and a couple of steep steps leading down intothe house, instead of the modern fashion of half a dozen shallow onesleading up to it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'It was a good large room with big closets, and a bed which might haveserved for a whole boarding-school, to say nothing of a couple of oakenpresses that would have held the baggage of a small army; but whatstruck Tom's fancy most was a strange, grim-looking, high backed chair,carved in the most fantastic manner, with a flowered damask cushion,and the round knobs at the bottom of the legs carefully tied up in redcloth, as if it had got the gout in its toes.<>
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The carving of the backgradually assumed the lineaments and expression of an old, shrivelledhuman face; the damask cushion became an antique, flapped waistcoat; theround knobs grew into a couple of feet, encased in red cloth slippers;and the whole chair looked like a very ugly old man, of the previouscentury, with his arms akimbo.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'In the first place, here are my little girls; I had almost forgottenthem,' said Minerva, carelessly pointing towards a couple of full-grownyoung ladies, of whom one might be about twenty, and the other a yearor two older, and who were dressed in very juvenile costumes--whetherto make them look young, or their mamma younger, Mr. Pickwick does notdistinctly inform us.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Nathaniel Pipkin's heart beat high within him, when he saw thisenticing little couple some hundred yards before him one summer'sevening, in the very field in which he had many a time strolled abouttill night-time, and pondered on the beauty of Maria Lobbs.<>
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The alarming intelligence was no soonercommunicated by the bony apprentice with the thin legs, than the girlstripped upstairs to Maria Lobbs's bedroom, and the male cousinand Nathaniel Pipkin were thrust into a couple of closets in thesitting-room, for want of any better places of concealment; and whenMaria Lobbs and the wicked little cousin had stowed them away, and putthe room to rights, they opened the street door to old Lobbs, who hadnever left off knocking since he first began.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Nature had placed Nathaniel Pipkin's knees in very close juxtaposition,but when he heard old Lobbs demand his pipe, they knocked together, asif they were going to reduce each other to powder; for, depending froma couple of hooks, in the very closet in which he stood, was a large,brown-stemmed, silver-bowled pipe, which pipe he himself had seen in themouth of old Lobbs, regularly every afternoon and evening, for the lastfive years.<>
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Mr. Tupman, with the most obliging haste, placed his piece in theposition required, and the party moved on again; the two amateursmarching with reversed arms, like a couple of privates at a royalfuneral.<>
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Bang, bang, went a couple of guns--the smokeswept quickly away over the field, and curled into the air.<>
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Dodson & Fogg was a dark, mouldy,earthy-smelling room, with a high wainscotted partition to screen theclerks from the vulgar gaze, a couple of old wooden chairs, a veryloud-ticking clock, an almanac, an umbrella-stand, a row of hat-pegs,and a few shelves, on which were deposited several ticketed bundles ofdirty papers, some old deal boxes with paper labels, and sundry decayedstone ink bottles of various shapes and sizes.<>
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Thechair was hired, and brought into the hall; Mr. Pickwick and Mr. Tupmansqueezed themselves inside, and pulled down the blinds; a couple ofchairmen were speedily found; and the procession started in grand order.<>
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So the fines were remitted, andMr. Jinks found a couple of bail in no time.<>
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A couple ofcandles were burning in the little front parlour, and a couple of capswere reflected on the window-blind.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The two caps, reflected on the window-blind, were the respectivehead-dresses of a couple of Mrs.<>
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Bardell's most particular acquaintance,who had just stepped in, to have a quiet cup of tea, and a little warmsupper of a couple of sets of pettitoes and some toasted cheese.<>
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Over that again were a pair of flags;beneath the last button of his coat were a couple of cannon; and thewhole formed an expressive and undoubted likeness of the Marquis ofGranby of glorious memory.<>
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'She ain't vithinhearin',' replied Mr. Weller; 'she always goes and blows up, downstairs,for a couple of hours arter tea; so we'll just give ourselves a damp,Sammy.<>
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Saying this, Mr. Weller mixed two glasses of spirits-and-water, andproduced a couple of pipes.<>
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T'other Sunday I wos walkin' up the road, wen who should I see,a-standin' at a chapel door, with a blue soup-plate in her hand, butyour mother-in-law! I werily believe there was change for a couple o'suv'rins in it, then, Sammy, all in ha'pence; and as the people comeout, they rattled the pennies in it, till you'd ha' thought that nomortal plate as ever was baked, could ha' stood the wear and tear.<>
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It is worthy of remark,too, that Mr. Snodgrass offered Emily far more assistance than theabsolute terrors of the stile (although it was full three feet high, andhad only a couple of stepping-stones) would seem to require; while oneblack-eyed young lady in a very nice little pair of boots with fur roundthe top, was observed to scream very loudly, when Mr. Winkle offered tohelp her over.<>
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And when the difficulties of thestile were at last surmounted, and they once more entered on the openfield, old Wardle informed Mr. Pickwick how they had all been down ina body to inspect the furniture and fittings-up of the house, whichthe young couple were to tenant, after the Christmas holidays; at whichcommunication Bella and Trundle both coloured up, as red as the fat boyafter the taproom fire; and the young lady with the black eyes andthe fur round the boots, whispered something in Emily's ear, and thenglanced archly at Mr. Snodgrass; to which Emily responded that she wasa foolish girl, but turned very red, notwithstanding; and Mr. Snodgrass,who was as modest as all great geniuses usually are, felt the crimsonrising to the crown of his head, and devoutly wished, in the inmostrecesses of his own heart, that the young lady aforesaid, with her blackeyes, and her archness, and her boots with the fur round the top, wereall comfortably deposited in the adjacent county.<>
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And me, and me,' said a couple of poorrelations at the bottom of the table, who had eaten and drunk veryheartily, and laughed at everything.<>
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Away went Mr. Pickwick--handsacross--down the middle to the very end of the room, and half-way up thechimney, back again to the door--poussette everywhere--loud stamp on theground--ready for the next couple--off again--all the figure over oncemore--another stamp to beat out the time--next couple, and the next, andthe next again--never was such going; at last, after they had reachedthe bottom of the dance, and full fourteen couple after the old ladyhad retired in an exhausted state, and the clergyman's wife had beensubstituted in her stead, did that gentleman, when there was no demandwhatever on his exertions, keep perpetually dancing in his place, tokeep time to the music, smiling on his partner all the while with ablandness of demeanour which baffles all description.<>
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HOW THE PICKWICKIANS MADE AND CULTIVATED THE ACQUAINTANCEOF A COUPLE OF NICE YOUNG MEN BELONGING TO ONE OF THE LIBERALPROFESSIONS; HOW THEY DISPORTED THEMSELVES ON THE ICE; AND HOW THEIRVISIT CAME TO A CONCLUSION'Well, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick, as that favoured servitor entered hisbed-chamber, with his warm water, on the morning of Christmas Day,'still frosty?Water in the wash-hand basin's a mask o' ice, Sir,' responded Sam.<>
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There's a couple o' sawbonesdownstairs.<>
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A couple of what!' exclaimed Mr. Pickwick, sitting up in bed.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'A couple o' sawbones,' said Sam.<>
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Trundle had a couple of pair,and the fat boy announced that there were half a dozen more downstairs;whereat Mr. Winkle expressed exquisite delight, and looked exquisitelyuncomfortable.<>
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I find I've got a couple of coats at home that I don'twant, Sam.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) After supper, another jug of punch was put upon the table, together witha paper of cigars, and a couple of bottles of spirits.<>
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As he was sauntering away his spare time, and stopped to look atalmost every object that met his gaze, it is by no means surprisingthat Mr. Weller should have paused before a small stationer's andprint-seller's window; but without further explanation it does appearsurprising that his eyes should have no sooner rested on certainpictures which were exposed for sale therein, than he gave a suddenstart, smote his right leg with great vehemence, and exclaimed, withenergy, 'if it hadn't been for this, I should ha' forgot all about it,till it was too late!'The particular picture on which Sam Weller's eyes were fixed, as he saidthis, was a highly-coloured representation of a couple of human heartsskewered together with an arrow, cooking before a cheerful fire, while amale and female cannibal in modern attire, the gentleman being clad in ablue coat and white trousers, and the lady in a deep red pelisse witha parasol of the same, were approaching the meal with hungry eyes, up aserpentine gravel path leading thereunto.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'And that,' said Mr. Pickwick, pointing to a couple of enclosed seats onhis right, 'that's where the jurymen sit, is it not?The identical place, my dear Sir,' replied Perker, tapping the lid ofhis snuff-box.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) A couple of tables were put together in the middle of the parlour,covered with three or four cloths of different ages and dates ofwashing, arranged to look as much like one as the circumstances of thecase would allow.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The mirth of Mr. Bob Sawyer was rapidly ripening into the furious, Mr.Ben Allen was fast relapsing into the sentimental, and the punch hadwell-nigh disappeared altogether, when the boy hastily running in,announced that a young woman had just come over, to say that Sawyer lateNockemorf was wanted directly, a couple of streets off.<>
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He accordingly retired in dudgeon to the racket-ground, where he made alight and whole-some breakfast on a couple of the cigars which had beenpurchased on the previous night.<>
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From this ledger he drewforth a couple of whiplashes, three or four buckles, a little sample-bagof corn, and, finally, a small roll of very dirty bank-notes, from whichhe selected the required amount, which he handed over to Sam.<>
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The coachman he not likin' the job, Set off at full gal-lop, But Dick put a couple of balls in his nob, And perwailed on him to stop.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) CHORUS (sarcastically) But Dick put a couple of balls in his nob, And perwailed on him to stop.<>
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His face was a queer, good-tempered,crooked-featured piece of workmanship, ornamented with a couple ofeyes that must have worn a very joyous expression at one time, for theysparkled yet.<>
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Then, he read two linesof the paper, and stopped short to look at a couple of men who werefinishing a game at rackets, which, being concluded, he cried out 'werygood,' in an approving manner, and looked round upon the spectators, toascertain whether their sentiments coincided with his own.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The gentleman with the uncombed head appeared quite satisfied with thismute announcement of their business, and, producing a flat stone bottle,which might hold about a couple of quarts, from beneath his bedstead,filled out three glasses of gin, which Job Trotter and Sam disposed ofin a most workmanlike manner.<>
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In fact, a couple of very good country agencies happening to comeup to town, at the same time, an agreeable little party had been gottogether to meet them, comprising Mr. Snicks, the Life Office Secretary,Mr. Prosee, the eminent counsel, three solicitors, one commissioner ofbankrupts, a special pleader from the Temple, a small-eyed peremptoryyoung gentleman, his pupil, who had written a lively book about the lawof demises, with a vast quantity of marginal notes and references; andseveral other eminent and distinguished personages.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Taking advantage of these symptoms of indecision, Mr. Perker (to whom,it appeared, the young couple had driven straight that morning) urgedwith legal point and shrewdness that Mr. Winkle, senior, was stillunacquainted with the important rise in life's flight of steps whichhis son had taken; that the future expectations of the said son dependedentirely upon the said Winkle, senior, continuing to regard him withundiminished feelings of affection and attachment, which it was veryunlikely he would, if this great event were long kept a secret from him;that Mr. Pickwick, repairing to Bristol to seek Mr. Allen, might, withequal reason, repair to Birmingham to seek Mr. Winkle, senior; lastly,that Mr. Winkle, senior, had good right and title to consider Mr.Pickwick as in some degree the guardian and adviser of his son, andthat it consequently behoved that gentleman, and was indeed due tohis personal character, to acquaint the aforesaid Winkle, senior,personally, and by word of mouth, with the whole circumstances of thecase, and with the share he had taken in the transaction.<>
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Over the mantelpiece werethe sunken doors of an iron safe, while a couple of hanging shelvesfor books, an almanac, and several files of dusty papers, decorated thewalls.<>
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Now young man,what of your master?He's a-stopping here to-night on his vay to town, with a couple offriends,' replied Sam.<>
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You are a couple of mean--Remember, sir, you pay dearly for this,' said Fogg.<>
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betrothed couple
= coppia di fidanzati ,
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compatible couple
= coppia che va perfettamente d'accordo ,
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courting couple
= fidanzati, innamorati, coppia di fidanzati ,
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married couple
= coppia di sposi,
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Coniugazione:1 - accoppiare
Ausiliare:essere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io mi accoppio
tu ti accoppi
egli si accoppia
noi ci accoppiamo
voi vi accoppiate
essi si accoppiano
Imperfetto
io mi accoppiavo
tu ti accoppiavi
egli si accoppiava
noi ci accoppiavamo
voi vi accoppiavate
essi si accoppiavano
Passato remoto
io mi accoppiai
tu ti accoppiasti
egli si accoppiò
noi ci accoppiammo
voi vi accoppiaste
essi si accoppiarono
Passato prossimo
io mi sono accoppiato
tu ti sei accoppiato
egli si é accoppiato
noi ci siamo accoppiati
voi vi siete accoppiati
essi si sono accoppiati
Trapassato prossimo
io mi ero accoppiato
tu ti eri accoppiato
egli era accoppiato
noi ci eravamo accoppiati
voi vi eravate accoppiati
essi si erano accoppiati
Trapassato remoto
io mi fui accoppiato
tu ti fosti accoppiato
egli si fu accoppiato
noi ci fummo accoppiati
voi vi foste accoppiati
essi si furono accoppiati
Futuro semplice
io mi accoppierò
tu ti accoppierai
egli si accoppierà
noi ci accoppieremo
voi vi accoppierete
essi si accoppieranno
Futuro anteriore
io mi sarò accoppiato
tu ti sarai accoppiato
egli si sarà accoppiato
noi ci saremo accoppiati
voi vi sarete accoppiati
essi si saranno accoppiati
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io mi accoppi
che tu ti accoppi
che egli si accoppi
che noi ci accoppiamo
che voi vi accoppiate
che essi si accoppino
Passato
che io mi sia accoppiato
che tu ti sia accoppiato
che egli si sia accoppiato
che noi ci siamo accoppiati
che voi vi siate accoppiati
che essi si siano accoppiati
Imperfetto
che io mi accoppiassi
che tu ti accoppiassi
che egli si accoppiasse
che noi ci accoppiassimo
che voi vi accoppiaste
che essi si accoppiassero
Trapassato
che io mi fossi accoppiato
che tu ti fossi accoppiato
che egli si fosse accoppiato
che noi ci fossimo accoppiati
che voi vi foste accoppiati
che essi si fossero accoppiati
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io mi accoppierei
tu ti accoppieresti
egli si accoppierebbe
noi ci accoppieremmo
voi vi accoppiereste
essi si accoppierebbero
Passato
io mi sarei accoppiato
tu ti saresti accoppiato
egli si sarebbe accoppiato
noi ci saremmo accoppiati
voi vi sareste accoppiati
essi si sarebbero accoppiati
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
accoppiati
si accoppi
accoppiamoci
accoppiatevi
si accoppino
Futuro
-
ti accoppierai
si accoppierà
ci accoppieremo
vi accoppierete
si accoppieranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
accoppiar
Passato
essersi accoppiato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
accoppiante
Passato
accoppiatosi
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
accoppiando
Passato
essendo accoppiato