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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I beg you would not put it into Lizzy's head to be vexed by hisill-treatment, for he is such a disagreeable man, that it would be quitea misfortune to be liked by him.<>
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Upon this signal, the youngest ofher daughters put herself forward.<>
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She was teased byMr. Collins, who continued most perseveringly by her side, and thoughhe could not prevail on her to dance with him again, put it out of herpower to dance with others.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth, feeling it incumbent on her to relieve him from so unpleasanta situation, now put herself forward to confirm his account, bymentioning her prior knowledge of it from Charlotte herself; andendeavoured to put a stop to the exclamations of her mother and sistersby the earnestness of her congratulations to Sir William, in which shewas readily joined by Jane, and by making a variety of remarks on thehappiness that might be expected from the match, the excellent characterof Mr. Collins, and the convenient distance of Hunsford from London.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Chapter 24Miss Bingley's letter arrived, and put an end to doubt.<>
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I would advise you merely to put onwhatever of your clothes is superior to the rest--there is no occasionfor anything more.<>
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The gentleman experienced some change offeeling; he drew back his chair, took a newspaper from the table, andglancing over it, said, in a colder voice:"Are you pleased with Kent?"A short dialogue on the subject of the country ensued, on either sidecalm and concise--and soon put an end to by the entrance of Charlotteand her sister, just returned from her walk.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Yes--if Darcy does not put it off again.<>
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My objections to themarriage were not merely those which I last night acknowledged to havethe utmost force of passion to put aside, in my own case; the want ofconnection could not be so great an evil to my friend as to me.<>
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She wishedto discredit it entirely, repeatedly exclaiming, "This must be false!This cannot be! This must be the grossest falsehood!"--and when she hadgone through the whole letter, though scarcely knowing anything of thelast page or two, put it hastily away, protesting that she would notregard it, that she would never look in it again.<>
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She put downthe letter, weighed every circumstance with what she meant to beimpartiality--deliberated on the probability of each statement--but withlittle success.<>
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Though Ishall always say he used my daughter extremely ill; and if I was her, Iwould not have put up with it.<>
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Her father, captivated by youth and beauty, and that appearanceof good humour which youth and beauty generally give, had married awoman whose weak understanding and illiberal mind had very early intheir marriage put an end to all real affection for her.<>
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Gardiner wereengaged with their children, was now put an end to by the approachof the whole party.<>
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I will put on my things in a moment.<>
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He was her dear Wickham on everyoccasion; no one was to be put in competition with him.<>
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If you'll believeme, I did not once put my foot out of doors, though I was there afortnight.<>
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However,I recollected afterwards that if he had been prevented going, thewedding need not be put off, for Mr. Darcy might have done as well.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) On such encouragement to ask, Elizabeth was forced to put it out of herpower, by running away.<>
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But at last your unclewas forced to yield, and instead of being allowed to be of use to hisniece, was forced to put up with only having the probable credit of it,which went sorely against the grain; and I really believe your letterthis morning gave him great pleasure, because it required an explanationthat would rob him of his borrowed feathers, and give the praise whereit was due.<>
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It was in The Times and The Courier, I know;though it was not put in as it ought to be.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) This naturally introduced a panegyric from Jane on his diffidence, andthe little value he put on his own good qualities.<>
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So, do not put yourself toinconvenience.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) As it happened that Elizabeth had much rather not, she endeavoured inher answer to put an end to every entreaty and expectation of the kind.<>
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)'Mr. PICKWICK would not put up to be put down by clamour.<>
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And having given vent to this beautiful reflection, Mr. Pickwickproceeded to put himself into his clothes, and his clothes into hisportmanteau.<>
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Terrible place--dangerous work--otherday--five children--mother--tall lady, eating sandwiches--forgot thearch--crash--knock--children look round--mother's head off--sandwichin her hand--no mouth to put it in--head of a family off--shocking,shocking! Looking at Whitehall, sir?--fine place--littlewindow--somebody else's head off there, eh, sir?--he didn't keep a sharplook-out enough either--eh, Sir, eh?I am ruminating,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'on the strange mutability ofhuman affairs.<>
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His new friend departed; and, afterexperiencing some slight difficulty in finding the orifice in hisnightcap, originally intended for the reception of his head, and finallyoverturning his candlestick in his struggles to put it on, Mr. TracyTupman managed to get into bed by a series of complicated evolutions,and shortly afterwards sank into repose.<>
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He had always been looked up to as a high authority on all matters ofamusement and dexterity, whether offensive, defensive, or inoffensive;and if, on this very first occasion of being put to the test, he shrunkback from the trial, beneath his leader's eye, his name and standingwere lost for ever.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The state of the case having been formally explained to Mr. Snodgrass,and a case of satisfactory pistols, with the satisfactory accompanimentsof powder, ball, and caps, having been hired from a manufacturer inRochester, the two friends returned to their inn; Mr. Winkle to ruminateon the approaching struggle, and Mr. Snodgrass to arrange the weapons ofwar, and put them into proper order for immediate use.<>
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I put a fewshillings in his hand, and as I turned away I heard the roar of laughterwhich followed his first tumble on the stage.<>
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A few nights afterwards,a boy put a dirty scrap of paper in my hand, on which were scrawled afew words in pencil, intimating that the man was dangerously ill, andbegging me, after the performance, to see him at his lodgings in somestreet--I forget the name of it now--at no great distance from thetheatre.<>
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So the stout gentleman put on hisspectacles, and Mr. Pickwick pulled out his glass, and everybody stoodup in the carriage, and looked over somebody else's shoulder at theevolutions of the military.<>
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The young Misses Wardle were so frightened,that Mr. Trundle was actually obliged to hold one of them up in thecarriage, while Mr. Snodgrass supported the other; and Mr. Wardle'ssister suffered under such a dreadful state of nervous alarm, that Mr.Tupman found it indispensably necessary to put his arm round her waist,to keep her up at all.<>
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Joe--damn that boy, he's gone to sleepagain--Joe, help Tom put in the horses.<>
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The horses were put in--the driver mounted--the fat boy clambered up byhis side--farewells were exchanged--and the carriage rattled off.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Bless my soul!' said Mr. Pickwick, as they stood upon the pavementwhile the coats were being put in.<>
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Wewant to put this horse up here,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'I suppose wecan, can't we?' 'Want to put that ere horse up, do ee?' repeated thered-headed man, leaning on his spade.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Can we put this horse up here, my good woman?' said Mr. Tupman,advancing, and speaking in his most seductive tones.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'We'll have you put to rights here,' said the old gentleman, 'and thenI'll introduce you to the people in the parlour.<>
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Grandma's rather put out now,' said Miss Isabella Wardle, in a lowtone; 'but she'll talk to you presently.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Joe, Joe!' said the gentleman; 'Joe--damn that--oh, here he is; put outthe card--tables.<>
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He was bribed by that scoundrel, Jingle, to put meon a wrong scent, by telling a cock-and-bull story of my sister andyour friend Tupman!' (Here Mr. Tupman sank into a chair.<>
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Now then, are youready?'Mr. Pickwick's mouth and chin having been hastily enveloped in a largeshawl, his hat having been put on his head, and his greatcoat thrownover his arm, he replied in the affirmative.<>
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Chaise-and-four directly!--out with 'em! Put up the gig afterwards.<>
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The hostler had somehow or other mislaid the key of the stable, and evenwhen that was found, two sleepy helpers put the wrong harness on thewrong horses, and the whole process of harnessing had to be gone throughafresh.<>
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Had Mr. Pickwick been alone, these multiplied obstacles wouldhave completely put an end to the pursuit at once, but old Wardle wasnot to be so easily daunted; and he laid about him with such heartygood-will, cuffing this man, and pushing that; strapping a buckle here,and taking in a link there, that the chaise was ready in a muchshorter time than could reasonably have been expected, under so manydifficulties.<>
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Who's numbertwenty-two, that's to put all the others out? No, no; reg'lar rotation,as Jack Ketch said, ven he tied the men up.<>
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--"No more nor you do,"says my father; "can't I put that in arterwards?"--"Impossible!" saysthe lawyer.<>
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Don't you think--now, my dear Sir, I put it to you don't youthink--that fifty pounds and liberty would be better than Miss Wardleand expectation?Won't do--not half enough!' said Mr. Jingle, rising.<>
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He took it from his coat pocket, anddrawing a small table towards his bedside, trimmed the light, put on hisspectacles, and composed himself to read.<>
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Hastilythrowing off such articles of clothing as he had put on when he rosefrom his uneasy bed, and casting a fearful glance around, he once morescrambled hastily between the sheets, and soon fell fast asleep.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The announcement of supper put a stop both to the game of ecarte, andthe recapitulation of the beauties of the Eatanswill GAZETTE.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Yes,' said his attendant, 'every man slept vere he fell down; wedragged 'em out, one by one, this mornin', and put 'em under the pump,and they're in reg'lar fine order now.<>
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"It won't do pushing on, such a night as this; thefirst house we come to we'll put up at, so the faster you go the soonerit's over.<>
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He put his hand into the pocket, and drew forth theidentical letter the old gentleman had described!'"Queer sort of thing, this," said Tom Smart, looking first at the chairand then at the press, and then at the letter, and then at the chairagain.<>
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But, as there was nothing in either, tolessen the queerness, he thought he might as well dress himself, andsettle the tall man's business at once--just to put him out of hismisery.<>
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TomSmart, in the energy of his compassion, had put his arm round thewidow's waist; and the widow, in a passion of grief, had clasped Tom'shand.<>
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IN WHICH IS GIVEN A FAITHFUL PORTRAITURE OF TWODISTINGUISHED PERSONS; AND AN ACCURATE DESCRIPTION OF A PUBLIC BREAKFASTIN THEIR HOUSE AND GROUNDS: WHICH PUBLIC BREAKFAST LEADS TO THERECOGNITION OF AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE, AND THE COMMENCEMENT OF ANOTHERCHAPTERMr. Pickwick's conscience had been somewhat reproaching him for hisrecent neglect of his friends at the Peacock; and he was just on thepoint of walking forth in quest of them, on the third morning after theelection had terminated, when his faithful valet put into his hand acard, on which was engraved the following inscription:-- Mrs.<>
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I know that,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'but as I cannot put myself incompetition with those great men, I cannot presume to wear theirdresses.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You don't mean to say,' said Mr. Pickwick, gazing with solemn sternnessat his friend--'you don't mean to say, Mr. Tupman, that it is yourintention to put yourself into a green velvet jacket, with a two-inchtail?Such IS my intention, Sir,' replied Mr. Tupman warmly.<>
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And the count put up his tablets, and withsundry bows and acknowledgments walked away, thoroughly satisfied thathe had made the most important and valuable additions to his stock ofinformation.<>
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It's someboarding-school in this town, I suppose, ain't it?' Now, although thisquestion was put in the most careless tone imaginable, Mr. Job Trotterplainly showed by gestures that he perceived his new friend's anxiety todraw forth an answer to it.<>
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The next time you go out to a smoking party,young fellow, fill your pipe with that 'ere reflection; and for thepresent just put that bit of pink gingham into your pocket.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Such having been the demeanour of this celebrated public charactertowards Mr. Winkle, it will be readily imagined that considerablesurprise was depicted on the countenance of the latter gentleman, when,as he was sitting alone in the breakfast-room, the door was hastilythrown open, and as hastily closed, on the entrance of Mr. Pott, who,stalking majestically towards him, and thrusting aside his profferedhand, ground his teeth, as if to put a sharper edge on what he was aboutto utter, and exclaimed, in a saw-like voice--'Serpent!Sir!' exclaimed Mr. Winkle, starting from his chair.<>
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He passed his handkerchief across his forehead, tookoff his spectacles, wiped them, and put them on again; and his voice hadrecovered its wonted softness of tone when he said--'What have you there, Sam?Called at the post-office just now, and found this here letter, as haslaid there for two days,' replied Mr. Weller.<>
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I know the gentleman'll put that 'ere charge into somebody afore he'sdone,' growled the long man.<>
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I'll put astuffed partridge on the top of a post, and practise at it, beginningat a short distance, and lengthening it by degrees.<>
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" Well, Ramsey tried to speak, butFogg wouldn't let him, so he put the money in his pocket, and sneakedout.<>
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As Fogg put himself very temptingly within the reach of Mr. Pickwick'sclenched fist, there is little doubt that that gentleman would havecomplied with his earnest entreaty, but for the interposition of Sam,who, hearing the dispute, emerged from the office, mounted the stairs,and seized his master by the arm.<>
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I worked down the weryday arter the night as you caught the rheumatic, and at the Black Boy atChelmsford--the wery place they'd come to--I took 'em up, right throughto Ipswich, where the man-servant--him in the mulberries--told me theywas a-goin' to put up for a long time.<>
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The gen'l'm'n can't go in just now,' said a shambling pot-boy, with ared head, 'cos' Mr. Lowten's a-singin' a comic song, and he'll put himout.<>
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Rather,perhaps; rather, eh?'The little old man put his head more on one side,and rubbed his hands with unspeakable glee.<>
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The steward thought he had run away: opened the door,and put a bill up.<>
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He was obliged to take somemouldering fixtures that were on the place, and, among the rest, was agreat lumbering wooden press for papers, with large glass doors, anda green curtain inside; a pretty useless thing for him, for he had nopapers to put in it; and as to his clothes, he carried them about withhim, and that wasn't very hard work, either.<>
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It startled him at first, but thinking, ona moment's reflection, that it must be some young fellow in the nextchamber, who had been dining out, he put his feet on the fender,and raised the poker to stir the fire.<>
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He had had allthe heart to leave his son a beggar, but proud even of his health andstrength, had put off the act till it was too late, and now mightgnash his teeth in the other world, at the thought of the wealth hisremissness had left him.<>
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As the old man concluded his tale, he advanced to apeg in one corner, and taking down his hat and coat, put them on withgreat deliberation; and, without saying another word, walked slowlyaway.<>
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Wouldn't I put her out to nurse!What do you think them women does t'other day,' continued Mr. Weller,after a short pause, during which he had significantly struck the sideof his nose with his forefinger some half-dozen times.<>
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Well, what with your mother-in-law a-worrying me to go,and what with my looking for'ard to seein' some queer starts if I did,I put my name down for a ticket; at six o'clock on the Friday evenin' Idresses myself out wery smart, and off I goes with the old 'ooman, andup we walks into a fust-floor where there was tea-things for thirty, anda whole lot o' women as begins whisperin' to one another, and lookin' atme, as if they'd never seen a rayther stout gen'l'm'n of eight-and-fiftyafore.<>
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Is there any gentleman of the nameof Tupman here, waiter?'A corpulent man, with a fortnight's napkin under his arm, and coevalstockings on his legs, slowly desisted from his occupation of staringdown the street, on this question being put to him by Mr. Pickwick; and,after minutely inspecting that gentleman's appearance, from the crown ofhis hat to the lowest button of his gaiters, replied emphatically--'No!Nor any gentleman of the name of Snodgrass?' inquired Mr. Pickwick.<>
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Here Mr.Magnus took off his spectacles, on purpose to wink, and then put them onagain.<>
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Although he had hastily Put on his hat over hisnightcap, after the manner of the old patrol; although he carried hisshoes and gaiters in his hand, and his coat and waistcoat over his arm;nothing could subdue his native politeness.<>
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As Mr. Pickwick bowed,he took his spectacles from his waistcoat pocket, and put them on;a process which he had no sooner gone through, than, uttering anexclamation of surprise, Mr. Pickwick retreated several paces, and thelady, with a half-suppressed scream, hid her face in her hands, anddropped into a chair; whereupon Mr. Peter Magnus was stricken motionlesson the spot, and gazed from one to the other, with a countenanceexpressive of the extremities of horror and surprise.<>
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This certainlywas, to all appearance, very unaccountable behaviour; but the factis, that Mr. Pickwick no sooner put on his spectacles, than he at oncerecognised in the future Mrs.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Now, the cook no sooner heard the concluding words of this desperatechallenge, and saw Mr. Muzzle about to put it into execution, than sheuttered a loud and piercing shriek; and rushing on Mr. Job Trotter, whorose from his chair on the instant, tore and buffeted his large flatface, with an energy peculiar to excited females, and twining her handsin his long black hair, tore therefrom about enough to make five or sixdozen of the very largest-sized mourning-rings.<>
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So just to prevent his losing it again, she put it on for him.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Pickwick had dined, finished his second pint of particular port,pulled his silk handkerchief over his head, put his feet on the fender,and thrown himself back in an easy-chair, when the entrance of Mr.Weller with his carpet-bag, aroused him from his tranquil meditation.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I could send them to Mr. Tupman's, for the present, Sam,' continuedMr. Pickwick, 'but before we take them away, it is necessary that theyshould be looked up, and put together.<>
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Bardell she may put a bill up, as soon as she likes.<>
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Bardell thus--'Wery sorry to 'casion any personal inconwenience, ma'am, as thehousebreaker said to the old lady when he put her on the fire; but as meand my governor 's only jest come to town, and is jest going away agin,it can't be helped, you see.<>
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Thirdly, to say as all histhings is to be put together, and give to anybody as we sends for 'em.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The tea-things had been scarcely put away, and the hearth swept up, whenthe London coach deposited Mr. Weller, senior, at the door; his legsdeposited him in the bar; and his eyes showed him his son.<>
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I'ddrop him in the water-butt, and put the lid on; and if I found he wasinsensible to kindness, I'd try the other persvasion.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) But the guard has delivered at the corn-dealer's shop, the brown paperpacket he took out of the little pouch which hangs over his shoulderby a leathern strap; and has seen the horses carefully put to; and hasthrown on the pavement the saddle which was brought from London on thecoach roof; and has assisted in the conference between the coachman andthe hostler about the gray mare that hurt her off fore-leg last Tuesday;and he and Mr. Weller are all right behind, and the coachman is allright in front, and the old gentleman inside, who has kept the windowdown full two inches all this time, has pulled it up again, and thecloths are off, and they are all ready for starting, except the 'twostout gentlemen,' whom the coachman inquires after with some impatience.<>
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Hereupon the coachman, and the guard, and Sam Weller, and Mr. Winkle,and Mr. Snodgrass, and all the hostlers, and every one of the idlers,who are more in number than all the others put together, shout for themissing gentlemen as loud as they can bawl.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Help Mr. Wardle's servant to put the packages into the cart, and thenride on with him.<>
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Whenthey laughed, the old lady laughed ten times more heartily, and saidthat these always had been considered capital stories, which caused themall to laugh again, and put the old lady into the very best of humours.<>
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Then the cake was cut, and passed through the ring; the young ladiessaved pieces to put under their pillows to dream of their futurehusbands on; and a great deal of blushing and merriment was therebyoccasioned.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'No, that he hadn't, my dear,' said Mr. Weller; 'and if you'd put anexact model of his own legs on the dinin'-table afore him, he wouldn'tha' known 'em.<>
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As to the poor relations, theykissed everybody, not even excepting the plainer portions of the younglady visitors, who, in their excessive confusion, ran right under themistletoe, as soon as it was hung up, without knowing it! Wardle stoodwith his back to the fire, surveying the whole scene, with the utmostsatisfaction; and the fat boy took the opportunity of appropriating tohis own use, and summarily devouring, a particularly fine mince-pie,that had been carefully put by, for somebody else.<>
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He was sitting perfectlystill; his tongue was put out, as if in derision; and he was grinning atGabriel Grub with such a grin as only a goblin could call up.<>
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So, GabrielGrub got on his feet as well as he could, for the pain in his back; and,brushing the frost off his coat, put it on, and turned his face towardsthe town.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I've put my name down for an arm at our place,' said Mr. Allen.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Pickwick paused, considered, pulled off his gloves and put them inhis hat; took two or three short runs, baulked himself as often, and atlast took another run, and went slowly and gravely down the slide, withhis feet about a yard and a quarter apart, amidst the gratified shoutsof all the spectators.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) It was the most intensely interesting thing, to observe the manner inwhich Mr. Pickwick performed his share in the ceremony; to watch thetorture of anxiety with which he viewed the person behind, gaining uponhim at the imminent hazard of tripping him up; to see him graduallyexpend the painful force he had put on at first, and turn slowly roundon the slide, with his face towards the point from which he had started;to contemplate the playful smile which mantled on his face when he hadaccomplished the distance, and the eagerness with which he turned roundwhen he had done so, and ran after his predecessor, his black gaiterstripping pleasantly through the snow, and his eyes beaming cheerfulnessand gladness through his spectacles.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) These sequestered nooks are the public offices of the legal profession,where writs are issued, judgments signed, declarations filed, andnumerous other ingenious machines put in motion for the torture andtorment of His Majesty's liege subjects, and the comfort and emolumentof the practitioners of the law.<>
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He was the master o' that 'ere shop, sir, and the inwentoro' the patent-never-leavin'-off sassage steam-ingin, as 'ud swaller up apavin' stone if you put it too near, and grind it into sassages as easyas if it was a tender young babby.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The Serjeant was writing when his clients entered; he bowed abstractedlywhen Mr. Pickwick was introduced by his solicitor; and then, motioningthem to a seat, put his pen carefully in the inkstand, nursed his leftleg, and waited to be spoken to.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I am very sorry to put you to any inconvenience, Mrs.<>
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I'm ratherconfined for room here, but you must put up with all that, when you cometo see a young bachelor.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) After supper, another jug of punch was put upon the table, together witha paper of cigars, and a couple of bottles of spirits.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) '"So I take the privilidge of the day, Mary, my dear--as the gen'l'm'nin difficulties did, ven he valked out of a Sunday--to tell you that thefirst and only time I see you, your likeness was took on my hart in muchquicker time and brighter colours than ever a likeness was took by theprofeel macheen (wich p'raps you may have heerd on Mary my dear) althoit DOES finish a portrait and put the frame and glass on complete,with a hook at the end to hang it up by, and all in two minutes and aquarter.<>
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And having folded it, in a very intricate manner, squeezed a downhilldirection in one corner: 'To Mary, Housemaid, at Mr. Nupkins's, Mayor's,Ipswich, Suffolk'; and put it into his pocket, wafered, and ready forthe general post.<>
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The greater part of the lights werequickly put out, and nothing but noise and confusion resounded on allsides.<>
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He rolled in, upon twolittle turned legs, and having bobbed gravely to the Bar, who bobbedgravely to him, put his little legs underneath his table, and his littlethree-cornered hat upon it; and when Mr. Justice Stareleigh had donethis, all you could see of him was two queer little eyes, one broad pinkface, and somewhere about half of a big and very comical-looking wig.<>
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There is nodate, gentlemen,' replied Serjeant Buzfuz; 'but I am instructed to saythat it was put in the plaintiff's parlour window just this time threeyears.<>
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" Actuated by thisbeautiful and touching impulse (among the best impulses of our imperfectnature, gentlemen), the lonely and desolate widow dried her tears,furnished her first floor, caught her innocent boy to her maternalbosom, and put the bill up in her parlour window.<>
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Let me tell him, gentlemen, that any gestures of dissent ordisapprobation in which he may indulge in this court will not go downwith you; that you will know how to value and how to appreciate them;and let me tell him further, as my Lord will tell you, gentlemen, thata counsel, in the discharge of his duty to his client, is neither to beintimidated nor bullied, nor put down; and that any attempt to do eitherthe one or the other, or the first, or the last, will recoil on thehead of the attempter, be he plaintiff or be he defendant, be his namePickwick, or Noakes, or Stoakes, or Stiles, or Brown, or Thompson.<>
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Sanders, whose eyes were intently fixed on the judge's face, plantedherself close by, with the large umbrella, keeping her right thumbpressed on the spring with an earnest countenance, as if she were fullyprepared to put it up at a moment's notice.<>
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Put it down a "we," my Lord, put it down a "we.<>
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Mr. Pickwick put on his spectacles, and gazed atthe foreman with an agitated countenance and a quickly-beating heart.<>
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Mr. Pickwick took off his spectacles, carefully wiped the glasses,folded them into their case, and put them in his pocket; then, havingdrawn on his gloves with great nicety, and stared at the foreman allthe while, he mechanically followed Mr. Perker and the blue bag out ofcourt.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Sam had put up the steps, and was preparing to jump upon the box, whenhe felt himself gently touched on the shoulder; and, looking round, hisfather stood before him.<>
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I wondered at what house the Bathcoach put up.<>
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They must put their names down.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Sam Weller put on his hat in a very easy and graceful manner, and,thrusting his hands in his waistcoat pockets, walked with greatdeliberation to Queen Square, whistling as he went along, several of themost popular airs of the day, as arranged with entirely new movementsfor that noble instrument the organ, either mouth or barrel.<>
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Tell the old gen'l'm'n not to put himself in aperspiration.<>
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Mr. Pickwickcarefully rubbed the last page on the blotting-paper, shut up the book,wiped his pen on the bottom of the inside of his coat tail, and openedthe drawer of the inkstand to put it carefully away.<>
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He was not put into better humour either, by thereflection that he had taken it into his head, early in the evening, tothink he had got an ache there, and so stopped at home.<>
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Here's somebody comingout of another house; put me into the chair.<>
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Craddock had heard the knocking and the voices at last; and,only waiting to put something smarter on her head than her nightcap,ran down into the front drawing-room to make sure that it was the rightparty.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) A couple of tables were put together in the middle of the parlour,covered with three or four cloths of different ages and dates ofwashing, arranged to look as much like one as the circumstances of thecase would allow.<>
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You'd save coals if they put youbehind the fender in the waitin'-room at a public office, you would.<>
---------------
The new-comers havingbeen welcomed by the old ones, Mr. Tuckle put the question that supperbe ordered in, which was carried unanimously.<>
---------------
The greengrocer put on a pair of wash-leathergloves to hand the plates with, and stationed himself behind Mr.Tuckle's chair.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Sam put a few necessaries in a carpet-bag, and was ready for starting.<>
---------------
I PASSED, soon afterthat precious party, and my friends came down with the needful for thisbusiness; so I put on a black suit of clothes, and a pair of spectacles,and came here to look as solemn as I could.<>
---------------
So snug, that at the end of a few yearsyou might put all the profits in a wine-glass, and cover 'em over witha gooseberry leaf.<>
---------------
Ben, my finefellow, put your hand into the cupboard, and bring out the patentdigester.<>
---------------
Mr. Bob Sawyer, understanding the message, after some twentyrepetitions, tied a wet cloth round his head to sober himself, and,having partially succeeded, put on his green spectacles and issuedforth.<>
---------------
Well, miss,' said Sam, 'he's heerd all about it from him; and it's thegov'nor's opinion that if you don't see him wery quick, the sawbones aswe've been a-speakin' on, 'ull get as much extra lead in his head as'llrayther damage the dewelopment o' the orgins if they ever put it inspirits artervards.<>
---------------
Mr. Pickwick appeared struck by Sam's remarks, for he put the lanterninto his pocket again, and they walked on in silence.<>
---------------
He put on his hat and walked quickly downthe garden, determined to investigate the matter to the very bottom.<>
---------------
Upon which Mr. Weller struckthree distinct blows upon his nose in token of intelligence, smiled,winked, and proceeded to put the steps up, with a countenance expressiveof lively satisfaction.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) As to the scientific gentleman, he demonstrated, in a masterly treatise,that these wonderful lights were the effect of electricity; and clearlyproved the same by detailing how a flash of fire danced before his eyeswhen he put his head out of the gate, and how he received a shock whichstunned him for a quarter of an hour afterwards; which demonstrationdelighted all the scientific associations beyond measure, and caused himto be considered a light of science ever afterwards.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Namby's the name,' said the sheriff's deputy, as Mr. Pickwick took hisspectacles from under the pillow, and put them on, to read the card.<>
---------------
But this Sam flatly and positively refused to do; and, after he hadbeen severely reprimanded by his master, the officer, being in a hurry,condescended to pick it up himself, venting a great variety of threatsagainst Sam meanwhile, which that gentleman received with perfectcomposure, merely observing that if Mr. Namby would have the goodnessto put his hat on again, he would knock it into the latter end ofnext week.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You'd hardly think, would you now,' said Price, turning towards Mr.Pickwick, 'that that chap's been here a week yesterday, and never onceshaved himself yet, because he feels so certain he's going out in halfan hour's time, thinks he may as well put it off till he gets home?Poor man!' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
---------------
Hem, Shakespeare! How doyou do, Sir? How is Mary and Sarah, sir? and the dear old lady at home,Sir? Will you have the kindness to put my compliments into the firstlittle parcel you're sending that way, sir, and say that I would havesent 'em before, only I was afraid they might be broken in the wagon,sir?Don't overwhelm the gentlemen with ordinary civilities when you seehe's anxious to have something to drink,' said the gentleman with thewhiskers, with a jocose air.<>
---------------
Unquestionably there were but few things to put away, if there had beenone; but, however few in number, or small in individual amount, still,remnants of loaves and pieces of cheese, and damp towels, and scragsof meat, and articles of wearing apparel, and mutilated crockery, andbellows without nozzles, and toasting-forks without prongs, do presentsomewhat of an uncomfortable appearance when they are scattered aboutthe floor of a small apartment, which is the common sitting and sleepingroom of three idle men.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'And now, Sammy,' said the old gentleman, when the whip-lashes, and thebuckles, and the samples, had been all put back, and the book oncemore deposited at the bottom of the same pocket, 'now, Sammy, I know agen'l'm'n here, as'll do the rest o' the bisness for us, in no time--alimb o' the law, Sammy, as has got brains like the frogs, dispersed allover his body, and reachin' to the wery tips of his fingers; a friendof the Lord Chancellorship's, Sammy, who'd only have to tell him what hewanted, and he'd lock you up for life, if that wos all.<>
---------------
The coachman he not likin' the job, Set off at full gal-lop, But Dick put a couple of balls in his nob, And perwailed on him to stop.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) CHORUS (sarcastically) But Dick put a couple of balls in his nob, And perwailed on him to stop.<>
---------------
Wy, in support of hisgreat principle that crumpets wos wholesome, and to show that hewouldn't be put out of his way for nobody!' With such like shiftings andchangings of the discourse, did Mr. Weller meet his master's questioningon the night of his taking up his residence in the Fleet.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Well, then,' said Sam, with some sternness, 'wot do you perseverein bein' obstinit for, vastin' your precious life away, in this heremagnified pound? Wy don't you give in, and tell the Chancellorship thatyou're wery sorry for makin' his court contemptible, and you won't do sono more?'The cobbler put his pipe in the corner of his mouth, while he smiled,and then brought it back to its old place again; but said nothing.<>
---------------
The cobbler paused to ascertain what effect his story had produced onSam; but finding that he had dropped asleep, knocked the ashes out ofhis pipe, sighed, put it down, drew the bed-clothes over his head, andwent to sleep, too.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'They may be put on, Mr. Weller,' said Job.<>
---------------
Here Master Bardell put hishands in his pockets, and jumped off and on the bottom step of the door.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Master Bardell put his hands deeper down into his pockets, and noddedexactly thirty-five times, to imply that it was the lady-lodger, and noother.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'It's put me all over in such a tremble, Betsy,' replied Mrs.<>
---------------
What has put Sam into this extraordinary state?Oh, nothing, nothing,' replied Perker.<>
---------------
Hear me out,my dear Sir, if you please, and do not be so very energetic, for itwill only put you into a perspiration and do no good whatever.<>
---------------
And now,my dear Sir, I put it to you.<>
---------------
Now I ask you, my dear sir, not only as your legal adviser,but as your very true friend, will you let slip the occasion ofattaining all these objects, and doing all this good, for the paltryconsideration of a few pounds finding their way into the pockets of acouple of rascals, to whom it makes no manner of difference, except thatthe more they gain, the more they'll seek, and so the sooner be ledinto some piece of knavery that must end in a crash? I have put theseconsiderations to you, my dear Sir, very feebly and imperfectly, butI ask you to think of them.<>
---------------
I'd put a bullet in him, if I found him out,' said Mr. Sawyer, stoppingin the course of a long draught of beer, and looking malignantly outof the porter pot.<>
---------------
Get on a little faster; put alittle more steam on, ma'am, pray.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Benjamin Allen deliberately crushed his spectacles beneath the heelof his boot, and having picked up the pieces, and put them into threeseparate pockets, folded his arms, bit his lips, and looked in athreatening manner at the bland features of Mr. Pickwick.<>
---------------
When a porter had put his luggage in the coach, and received hisfare, he turned round and was gone; and before my uncle had well begunto wonder what had become of him, half a dozen fresh ones started up,and staggered along under the weight of parcels, which seemed big enoughto crush them.<>
---------------
Then he drew his feet together, andmade a low, grave bow, and then put out his left hand.<>
---------------
"'The young lady put up her hand as if to caution my uncle not to do so,and said--No, she didn't say anything--she smiled.<>
---------------
HOW Mr. PICKWICK SPED UPON HIS MISSION, AND HOW HE WASREINFORCED IN THE OUTSET BY A MOST UNEXPECTED AUXILIARYThe horses were put to, punctually at a quarter before nine nextmorning, and Mr. Pickwick and Sam Weller having each taken his seat, theone inside and the other out, the postillion was duly directed to repairin the first instance to Mr. Bob Sawyer's house, for the purpose oftaking up Mr. Benjamin Allen.<>
---------------
Here's Ben; now then,jump in!'With these hurried words, Mr. Bob Sawyer pushed the postboy on one side,jerked his friend into the vehicle, slammed the door, put up the steps,wafered the bill on the street door, locked it, put the key in hispocket, jumped into the dickey, gave the word for starting, and did thewhole with such extraordinary precipitation, that before Mr. Pickwickhad well begun to consider whether Mr. Bob Sawyer ought to go or not,they were rolling away, with Mr. Bob Sawyer thoroughly established aspart and parcel of the equipage.<>
---------------
Before Sam could interpose, Mr. Bob Sawyer gracefully struck hiscolours, and having put them in his pocket, nodded in a courteous mannerto Mr. Pickwick, wiped the mouth of the case-bottle, and applied it tohis own, thereby informing him, without any unnecessary waste of words,that he devoted that draught to wishing him all manner of happiness andprosperity.<>
---------------
Tell them to put everything they have cold, on the table, and somebottled ale, and let us taste your very best Madeira.<>
---------------
Under the auspicesof the three, the bottled ale and the Madeira were promptly disposed of;and when (the horses being once more put to) they resumed their seats,with the case-bottle full of the best substitute for milk-punch thatcould be procured on so short a notice, the key-bugle sounded, and thered flag waved, without the slightest opposition on Mr. Pickwick's part.<>
---------------
The old gentleman methodically indorsed the address on the back of theletter; and then, placing it in the desk, which he locked, said, as hegot off the stool and put the bunch of keys in his pocket--'I suppose there is nothing else which need detain us, Mr. Pickwick?Nothing else, my dear Sir!' observed that warm-hearted person inindignant amazement.<>
---------------
Wotever is, is right, as the youngnobleman sweetly remarked wen they put him down in the pension list 'coshis mother's uncle's vife's grandfather vunce lit the king's pipe vith aportable tinder-box.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You take yourselves off to bed quietly,' said Sam, 'or I'll put youboth in it, and let you fight it out vith the mouth tied, as I voulda dozen sich, if they played these games.<>
---------------
Thus admonishing him, the pretty housemaid pushed Sam against the wall,declaring that he had tumbled her cap, and put her hair quite out ofcurl.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'My DEAR SAMMLE,'I am werry sorry to have the pleasure of being a Bear of ill news yourMother in law cort cold consekens of imprudently settin too long on thedamp grass in the rain a hearing of a shepherd who warnt able to leaveoff till late at night owen to his having vound his-self up vith brandyand vater and not being able to stop his-self till he got a little soberwhich took a many hours to do the doctor says that if she'd svallo'dvarm brandy and vater artervards insted of afore she mightn't have beenno vus her veels wos immedetly greased and everythink done to set heragoin as could be inwented your father had hopes as she vould havevorked round as usual but just as she wos a turnen the corner my boy shetook the wrong road and vent down hill vith a welocity you never see andnotvithstandin that the drag wos put on directly by the medikel manit wornt of no use at all for she paid the last pike at twenty minutesafore six o'clock yesterday evenin havin done the journey wery muchunder the reglar time vich praps was partly owen to her haven taken inwery little luggage by the vay your father says that if you vill comeand see me Sammy he vill take it as a wery great favor for I am werylonely Samivel n.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The pretty housemaid put out a hand which, although it was ahousemaid's, was a very small one, and rose to go.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Stiggins kept the brown pocket-handkerchief before his eyes for someminutes, moaning decently meanwhile, and then, mastering his feelings bya strong effort, put it in his pocket and buttoned it up.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Mr. Stiggins, encouraged by this sound, which he understood to betokenremorse or repentance, looked about him, rubbed his hands, wept,smiled, wept again, and then, walking softly across the room to awell-remembered shelf in one corner, took down a tumbler, and with greatdeliberation put four lumps of sugar in it.<>
---------------
Upon which, Arabella,who was one of the best little creatures alive, put her handkerchief inher reticule, and by the time Mr. Winkle joined them, exhibited in fulllustre the same beaming smiles and sparkling eyes that had originallycaptivated him.<>
---------------
Here, in the twinklingof an eye, he divested himself of his coat, put on a threadbare garment,which he took out of a desk, hung up his hat, pulled forth a few sheetsof cartridge and blotting-paper in alternate layers, and, sticking a penbehind his ear, rubbed his hands with an air of great satisfaction.<>
---------------
So saying, he put his umbrellaunder his arm, drew off his right glove, and extended the hand ofreconciliation to that most indignant gentleman; who, thereupon, thrusthis hands beneath his coat tails, and eyed the attorney with looks ofscornful amazement.<>
---------------
My dear Sir, pray let the matter rest where it is,' said the littleattorney, who had been in a state of nervous apprehension during thewhole interview; 'Mr. Pickwick, I beg--I will not be put down, Sir,' replied Mr. Pickwick hastily.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'There, there--good-morning--good-morning--now pray, my dear sirs--Mr.Lowten, the door!' cried the little man, pushing Dodson & Fogg, nothingloath, out of the office; 'this way, my dear sirs--now pray don'tprolong this--Dear me--Mr. Lowten--the door, sir--why don't you attend?If there's law in England, sir,' said Dodson, looking towards Mr.Pickwick, as he put on his hat, 'you shall smart for this.<>
---------------
The boy grinned to addpoint to the compliment, and put his eyes into something between asquint and a cast, which there is reason to believe he intended for anogle.<>
---------------
Poor creetur, shemight ha' filled all the tea-pots in the house vith vills, and not haveinconwenienced herself neither, for she took wery little of anythin' inthat vay lately, 'cept on the temperance nights, ven they just laid afoundation o' tea to put the spirits atop on!What does it say?' inquired Sam.<>
---------------
And I s'pose as it's all right andsatisfactory to you and me as is the only parties interested, ve may asvell put this bit o' paper into the fire.<>
---------------
( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) In pursuance of this notable resolution, the services of themottled-faced gentleman and of two other very fat coachmen--selectedby Mr. Weller, probably, with a view to their width and consequentwisdom--were put into requisition; and this assistance having beensecured, the party proceeded to the public-house in Portugal Street,whence a messenger was despatched to the Insolvent Court over the way,requiring Mr. Solomon Pell's immediate attendance.<>
---------------
You said you'd speak,' replied Sam; 'how should I know you wos done upat the wery beginnin'?You might ha' seen I warn't able to start,' rejoined his father; 'I'mon the wrong side of the road, and backin' into the palin's, and allmanner of unpleasantness, and yet you von't put out a hand to help me.<>
---------------
I'm a-goin' to vork a coach reg'lar, and ha'n'tgot noveres to keep it in, unless I vos to pay the guard for takin'care on it, or to put it in vun o' the coach pockets, vich 'ud be atemptation to the insides.<>
---------------
There was something so very cool and collected in the gentleman'smanner, that the waiter put the five shillings in his pocket, and ledhim upstairs without another word.<>
---------------
He put his head on his hands and remained amoment, as if full of a silent convulsion of thought.<>
---------------
But I simplycouldn't have you going off and telling all your countrymen that I had asecret magic connected with Thought-Forms, could I? I've put it badly,but it's true.<>
---------------
If he lets himself go likethat, it's because he thinks he can get a conviction, anyhow, and wantsto put himself at the head of some political movement against theconspiracy he talks about.<>
---------------
Suppose I told them that there is a man in my country whowon't ask a question of life and death, until he has put an erectionmade of horse-hair on the top of his head, with little tails behind,and grey corkscrew curls at the side, like an Early Victorian old woman.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) But the newspaper reference to their new and possibly alarming neighboursoon put both controversialists out of court.<>
---------------
You aren't afraid of it, are you?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well," said Mr. Smith, blinking thoughtfully, "I don't want to beselfish, and I don't think I'm afraid-I'll come with you if you put itthat way.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) He sighed, and put out his hand for his big, black hat.<>
---------------
He neverdid put on the disguise.<>
---------------
Somebody else manufactured the disguise atleisure, and then put it on him.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "It's extraordinary how he leaves things about," said Mr. Smart's headclerk, Jameson, who had come up from the office to assist the newsecretary, "and he won't even put up those ramshackle old bars acrosshis ramshackle old door.<>
---------------
He always put his favourite goldfish in the room atthe back of his bedroom for the night, and slept in front of it, as itwere, with a pistol under his pillow.<>
---------------
I should prefer you, Jameson, to sleep upstairs inmy room to-night; if you put the bowl in the back room as usual, itwill be quite safe then.<>
---------------
Boyle dragged his bed right across so as to bar thisentrance, put the revolver under his pillow, and then undressed and wentto bed, feeling that he had taken all possible precautions against animpossible or improbable event.<>
---------------
He had examined everything, measured,everything, taken down everybody's deposition, taken everybody's finger-prints, put everybody's back up, and found himself at the end leftfacing a fact which he could not believe.<>
---------------
"I put up those bars myself,just now.<>
---------------
As it turns out it isjolly lucky for our friends here that poor Mandeville did put those twosilly society women in the box to watch the rehearsal.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Father Brown frowned, which he did very rarely; and there was still acloud on his brow as he put on his hat and went out into the night.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Sir Arthur Vaudrey was glaring and grinning up at him; the face wasturned up so that he could have put his foot on it; the head was thrownback, with its wig of whitish yellow hair towards him, so that he sawthe face upside down.<>
---------------
When he shaved and put the wig on his cropped head he wasexactly like his father, with a little make-up.<>
---------------
Why don't you think the ruby had been there all thetime?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Only because I put it back myself," said Father Brown.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Or rather," went on the priest, "I persuaded the thief to let me put itback.<>
---------------
He really was put off by finding it was apalmist, because----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well," demanded the other impatiently.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Mallow felt a faint sense of incongruity; but he was far too full of hisproblem to put off the conversation if he could, help it.<>
---------------
be prepared to put your hand in your pocket
= preparati a metter mano al portafoglio! , preparati a metter mano alla tasca! ,
---------------
bear put spread
= opzione doppia al ribasso ,
---------------
bear put spreads
= opzioni doppie al ribasso ,
---------------
don't put on that of wounded dignity
= non assumere quell'aria di dignità ferita! ,
---------------
don't put the blame on me
= non dare la colpa a me ,
---------------
don't put yourself out
= non disturbarti! ,
---------------
hard put
= in imbarazzo,
---------------
hard put to
= in imbarazzo a, in grande difficoltà a,
---------------
hard put to do
= in imbarazzo a fare,
---------------
hard put to it
= in grande difficoltà, messo alle strette,
---------------
i won't put up with it any longer
= non ho più intenzione di sopportarlo,
---------------
prepared to put your hand in your pocket
= preparato a metter mano al portafoglio, preparato a metter mano alla tasca,
---------------
this job has put years on me
= questo lavoro mi ha fatto invecchiare! ,
---------------
to put it another way
= per dirla in altri termini ,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - accodare
Ausiliare:avere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io accodo
tu accodi
egli accoda
noi accodiamo
voi accodate
essi accodano
Imperfetto
io accodavo
tu accodavi
egli accodava
noi accodavamo
voi accodavate
essi accodavano
Passato remoto
io accodai
tu accodasti
egli accodò
noi accodammo
voi accodaste
essi accodarono
Passato prossimo
io ho accodato
tu hai accodato
egli ha accodato
noi abbiamo accodato
voi avete accodato
essi hanno accodato
Trapassato prossimo
io avevo accodato
tu avevi accodato
egli aveva accodato
noi avevamo accodato
voi avevate accodato
essi avevano accodato
Trapassato remoto
io ebbi accodato
tu avesti accodato
egli ebbe accodato
noi avemmo accodato
voi eveste accodato
essi ebbero accodato
Futuro semplice
io accoderò
tu accoderai
egli accoderà
noi accoderemo
voi accoderete
essi accoderanno
Futuro anteriore
io avrò accodato
tu avrai accodato
egli avrà accodato
noi avremo accodato
voi avrete accodato
essi avranno accodato
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io accodi
che tu accodi
che egli accodi
che noi accodiamo
che voi accodiate
che essi accodino
Passato
che io abbia accodato
che tu abbia accodato
che egli abbia accodato
che noi abbiamo accodato
che voi abbiate accodato
che essi abbiano accodato
Imperfetto
che io accodassi
che tu accodassi
che egli accodasse
che noi accodassimo
che voi accodaste
che essi accodassero
Trapassato
che io avessi accodato
che tu avessi accodato
che egli avesse accodato
che noi avessimo accodato
che voi aveste accodato
che essi avessero accodato
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io accoderei
tu accoderesti
egli accoderebbe
noi accoderemmo
voi accodereste
essi accoderebbero
Passato
io avrei accodato
tu avresti accodato
egli avrebbe accodato
noi avremmo accodato
voi avreste accodato
essi avrebbero accodato
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
accoda
accodi
accodiamo
accodate
accodino
Futuro
-
accoderai
accoderà
accoderemo
accoderete
accoderanno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
accodar
Passato
essersi accodato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
accodante
Passato
accodato
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
accodando
Passato
avendo accodato
Verb: to put-put-put
Ausiliar: to have - transitivo/intransitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I put in...
you put in...
he/she/it puts in...
we put in...
you put in...
they put in...
Simple past
I put in...
you put in...
he/she/it put in...
we put in...
you put in...
they put in...
Simple past
I put in...
you put in...
he/she/it put in...
we put in...
you put in...
they put in...
Present perfect
I have put in...
you have put in...
he/she/it has put in...
we have put in...
you have put in...
they have put in...
Past perfect
I had put in...
you had put in...
he/she/it had put in...
we had put in...
you had put in...
they had put in...
Past perfect
I had put in...
you had put in...
he/she/it had put in...
we had put in...
you had put in...
they had put in...
Simple future
I will put in...
you will put in...
he/she/it will put in...
we will put in...
you will put in...
they will put in...
Future perfect
I will have put in...
you will have put in...
he/she/it will have put in...
we will have put in...
you will have put in...
they will have put in...
Present continuous
I am putting in...
you are putting in...
he/she/it is putting in...
we are putting in...
you are putting in...
they are putting in...
Past simple continuous
I was putting in...
you were putting in...
he/she/it was putting in...
we were putting in...
you were putting in...
they were putting in...
Future continuous
I will be putting in...
you will be putting in...
he/she/it will be putting in...
we will be putting in...
you will be putting in...
they will be putting in...
Future perfect continuous
I will have been putting in...
you will have been putting in...
he/she/it will have been putting in...
we will have been putting in...
you will have been putting in...
they will have been putting in...
Present perfect continuous
I have been putting in...
you have been putting in...
he/she/it has been putting in...
we have been putting in...
you have been putting in...
they have been putting in...
Past perfect continuous
I had been putting in...
you had been putting in...
he/she/it had been putting in...
we had been putting in...
you had been putting in...
they had been putting in...
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I put in...
That you put in...
That he/she/it put in...
That we put in...
That you put in...
That they put in...
Present perfect
That I have put in...
That you have put in...
That he/she/it have put in...
That we have put in...
That you have put in...
That they have put in...
Simple past
That I put in...
That you put in...
That he/she/it put in...
That we put in...
That you put in...
That they put in...
Past perfect
That I had put in...
That you had put in...
That he/she/it had put in...
That we had put in...
That you had put in...
That they had put in...
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would put in...
you would put in...
we would put in...
we would put in...
you would put in...
they would put in...
Past
I would have put
you would have put
he/she/it would have put
we would have put
you would have put
they would have put
Present continous
I would be putting in...
you would be putting in...
we would be putting in...
we would be putting in...
you would be putting in...
they would be putting in...
Past continous
I would have been putting
you would have been putting
he/she/it would have been putting
we would have been putting
you would have been putting
they would have been putting
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
let me put in...
put in...
let him put in...
let us put in...
put in...
let them put in...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to put
Past
to have put
Present continous
to be putting
Perfect continous
to have been putting
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
putting
Past
put
Perfect
having put
Affermative - GERUND
Present
putting
Past
having put
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do not put in...
you do not put in...
he/she/it does not puts in...
we do not put in...
you do not put in...
they do not put in...
Simple past
I did not put in...
you did not put in...
he/she/it did not put in...
we did not put in...
you did not put in...
they did not put in...
Simple past
I did not put in...
you did not put in...
he/she/it did not put in...
we did not put in...
you did not put in...
they did not put in...
Present perfect
I have not put in...
you have not put in...
he/she/it has not put in...
we have not put in...
you have not put in...
they have not put in...
Past perfect
I had not put in...
you had not put in...
he/she/it had not put in...
we had not put in...
you had not put in...
they had not put in...
Past perfect
I had not put in...
you had not put in...
he/she/it had not put in...
we had not put in...
you had not put in...
they had not put in...
Simple future
I will not put in...
you will not put in...
he/she/it will not put in...
we will not put in...
you will not put in...
they will not put in...
Future perfect
I will not have put in...
you will not have put in...
he/she/it will not have put in...
we will not have put in...
you will not have put in...
they will not have put in...
Present continuous
I am not putting in...
you are not putting in...
he/she/it is not putting in...
we are not putting in...
you are not putting in...
they are not putting in...
Past simple continuous
I was not putting in...
you were not putting in...
he/she/it was not putting in...
we were not putting in...
you were not putting in...
they were not putting in...
Future continuous
I will not be putting in...
you will not be putting in...
he/she/it will not be putting in...
we will not be putting in...
you will not be putting in...
they will not be putting in...
Future perfect continuous
I will not have been putting in...
you will not have been putting in...
he/she/it will not have been putting in...
we will not have been putting in...
you will not have been putting in...
they will not have been putting in...
Present perfect continuous
I have not been putting in...
you have not been putting in...
he/she/it has not been putting in...
we have not been putting in...
you have not been putting in...
they have not been putting in...
Past perfect continuous
I had not been putting in...
you had not been putting in...
he/she/it had not been putting in...
we had not been putting in...
you had not been putting in...
they had not been putting in...
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do not put in...
That you do not put in...
That he/she/it does not put in...
That we do not put in...
That you do not put in...
That they do not put in...
Present perfect
That I have not put in...
That you have not put in...
That he/she/it have not put in...
That we have not put in...
That you have not put in...
That they have not put in...
Simple past
That I did not put in...
That you did not put in...
That he/she/it did not put in...
That we did not put in...
That you did not put in...
That they did not put in...
Past perfect
That I had not put in...
That you had not put in...
That he/she/it had not put in...
That we had not put in...
That you had not put in...
That they had not put in...
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not put in...
you would not put in...
we would not put in...
we would not put in...
you would not put in...
they would not put in...
Past
I would not have put
you would not have put
he/she/it would not have put
we would not have put
you would not have put
they would not have put
Present continous
I would not be putting in...
you would not be putting in...
we would not be putting in...
we would not be putting in...
you would not be putting in...
they would not be putting in...
Past continous
I would not have been putting
you would not have been putting
he/she/it would not have been putting
we would not have been putting
you would not have been putting
they would not have been putting
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
do not let me put in...
do not put in...
do not let him put in...
do not let us put in...
do not put in...
do not let them put in...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to put
Past
not to have put
Present continous
not to be putting
Perfect continous
not to have been putting
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not putting
Past
not put
Perfect
not having put
Negative - GERUND
Present
not putting
Past
not having put
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I put in...?
do you put in...?
does she/he/it puts in...?
do we put in...?
do you put in...?
do they put in...?
Simple past
did I put in...?
did you put in...?
did she/he/it put in...?
did we put in...?
did you put in...?
did they put in...?
Simple past
did I put in...?
did you put in...?
did she/he/it put in...?
did we put in...?
did you put in...?
did they put in...?
Present perfect
have I put in...?
have you put in...?
has she/he/it put in...?
have we put in...?
have you put in...?
have they put in...?
Past perfect
had I put in...?
had you put in...?
had she/he/it put in...?
had we put in...?
had you put in...?
had they put in...?
Past perfect
had I put in...?
had you put in...?
had she/he/it put in...?
had we put in...?
had you put in...?
had they put in...?
Simple future
will I put in...?
will you put in...?
will she/he/it put in...?
will we put in...?
will you put in...?
will they put in...?
Future perfect
will I have put in...?
will you have put in...?
will she/he/it have put in...?
will we have put in...?
will you have put in...?
will they have put in...?
Present continuous
am I putting in...?
are you putting in...?
is she/he/it putting in...?
are we putting in...?
are you putting in...?
are they putting in...?
Past simple continuous
was I putting in...?
were you putting in...?
was she/he/it putting in...?
were we putting in...?
were you putting in...?
were they putting in...?
Future continuous
will I be putting in...?
will you be putting in...?
will she/he/it be putting in...?
will we be putting in...?
will you be putting in...?
will they be putting in...?
Future perfect continuous
will I have been putting in...?
will you have been putting in...?
will she/he/it have been putting in...?
will we have been putting in...?
will you have been putting in...?
will they have been putting in...?
Present perfect continuous
have I been putting in...?
have you been putting in...?
has she/he/it been putting in...?
have we been putting in...?
have you been putting in...?
have they been putting in...?
Past perfect continuous
had I been putting in...?
had you been putting in...?
had she/he/it been putting in...?
had we been putting in...?
had you been putting in...?
had they been putting in...?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I put in...?
That do you put in...?
That does she/he/it put in...?
That do we put in...?
That do you put in...?
That do they put in...?
Present perfect
That have I put in...?
That have you put in...?
That have she/he/it put in...?
That have we put in...?
That have you put in...?
That have they put in...?
Simple past
That did I put in...?
That did you put in...?
That did she/he/it put in...?
That did we put in...?
That did you put in...?
That did they put in...?
Past perfect
That had I put in...?
That had you put in...?
That had she/he/it put in...?
That had we put in...?
That had you put in...?
That had they put in...?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I put in...?
would you put in...?
would she/he/it put in...?
would we put in...?
would you put in...?
would they put in...?
Past
would I have put?
would you have put?
would she/he/it have put?
would we have put?
would you have put?
would they have put?
Present continous
would I be putting in...?
would you be putting in...?
would she/he/it be putting in...?
would we be putting in...?
would you be putting in...?
would they be putting in...?
Past continous
would I have been putting?
would you have been putting?
would she/he/it have been putting?
would we have been putting?
would you have been putting?
would they have been putting?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not put in...?
do you not put in...?
does she/he/it not puts in...?
do we not put in...?
do you not put in...?
do they not put in...?
Simple past
did I not put in...?
did you not put in...?
did she/he/it not put in...?
did we not put in...?
did you not put in...?
did they not put in...?
Simple past
did I not put in...?
did you not put in...?
did she/he/it not put in...?
did we not put in...?
did you not put in...?
did they not put in...?
Present perfect
have I not put in...?
have you not put in...?
has she/he/it not put in...?
have we not put in...?
have you not put in...?
have they not put in...?
Past perfect
had I not put in...?
had you not put in...?
had she/he/it not put in...?
had we not put in...?
had you not put in...?
had they not put in...?
Past perfect
had I not put in...?
had you not put in...?
had she/he/it not put in...?
had we not put in...?
had you not put in...?
had they not put in...?
Simple future
will I not put in...?
will you not put in...?
will she/he/it not put in...?
will we not put in...?
will you not put in...?
will they not put in...?
Future perfect
will I not have put in...?
will you not have put in...?
will she/he/it not have put in...?
will we not have put in...?
will you not have put in...?
will they not have put in...?
Present continuous
am I not putting in...?
are you not putting in...?
is she/he/it not putting in...?
are we not putting in...?
are you not putting in...?
are they not putting in...?
Past simple continuous
was I not putting in...?
were you not putting in...?
was she/he/it not putting in...?
were we not putting in...?
were you not putting in...?
were they not putting in...?
Future continuous
will I not be putting in...?
will you not be putting in...?
will she/he/it not be putting in...?
will we not be putting in...?
will you not be putting in...?
will they not be putting in...?
Future perfect continuous
will I not have been putting in...?
will you not have been putting in...?
will she/he/it not have been putting in...?
will we not have been putting in...?
will you not have been putting in...?
will they not have been putting in...?
Present perfect continuous
have I not been putting in...?
have you not been putting in...?
has she/he/it not been putting in...?
have we not been putting in...?
have you not been putting in...?
have they not been putting in...?
Past perfect continuous
had I not been putting in...?
had you not been putting in...?
had she/he/it not been putting in...?
had we not been putting in...?
had you not been putting in...?
had they not been putting in...?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not put in...?
That do you not put in...?
That does she/he/it not put in...?
That do we not put in...?
That do you not put in...?
That do they not put in...?
Present perfect
That have I not put in...?
That have you not put in...?
That have she/he/it not put in...?
That have we not put in...?
That have you not put in...?
That have they not put in...?
Simple past
That did I not put in...?
That did you not put in...?
That did she/he/it not put in...?
That did we not put in...?
That did you not put in...?
That did they not put in...?
Past perfect
That had I not put in...?
That had you not put in...?
That had she/he/it not put in...?
That had we not put in...?
That had you not put in...?
That had they not put in...?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not put in...?
would you not put in...?
would she/he/it not put in...?
would we not put in...?
would you not put in...?
would they not put in...?
Past
would I not have put?
would you not have put?
would she/he/it not have put?
would we not have put?
would you not have put?
would they not have put?
Present continous
would I not be putting in...?
would you not be putting in...?
would she/he/it not be putting in...?
would we not be putting in...?
would you not be putting in...?
would they not be putting in...?
Past continous
would I not have been putting?
would you not have been putting?
would she/he/it not have been putting?
would we not have been putting?
would you not have been putting?
would they not have been putting?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present