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Italiano
Vocabolario e frasi
abbonare
= verbo trans. fare un abbonamento a favore di qualcuno abbonarsi
= verbo rifl. contrarre un abbonamento
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abbonato
= participio passato di abbonare
= che , colui che ha contratto un abbonamento .
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abbuonare
= abbonare .
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riabbonare
= verbo trans. abbonare di nuovo
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riabbonarsi
= verbo riflessivo abbonarsi di nuovo
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Inglese
Vocabolario e frasi
"(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Mr. Bennet was so odd a mixture of quick parts, sarcastic humour,reserve, and caprice, that the experience of three-and-twenty years hadbeen insufficient to make his wife understand his character.<>
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Bennet deigned not to make any reply, but, unable to containherself, began scolding one of her daughters (Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Don't keep coughing so, Kitty, for Heaven's sake! Have a littlecompassion on my nerves.<>
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What say you,Mary? For you are a young lady of deep reflection, I know, and readgreat books and make extracts.<>
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"I do not know how you will ever make him amends for his kindness;or me, either, for that matter.<>
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But to be candid without ostentation or design--to take thegood of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothingof the bad--belongs to you alone.<>
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Jane shouldtherefore make the most of every half-hour in which she can command hisattention.<>
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This is not quiteenough to make her understand his character.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "You make me laugh, Charlotte; but it is not sound.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) He paused in hopes of an answer; but his companion was not disposedto make any; and Elizabeth at that instant moving towards them, he wasstruck with the action of doing a very gallant thing, and called out toher:"My dear Miss Eliza, why are you not dancing? Mr. Darcy, you must allowme to present this young lady to you as a very desirable partner.<>
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Bennet's eyes sparkled with pleasure, and she waseagerly calling out, while her daughter read,"Well, Jane, who is it from? What is it about? What does he say? Well,Jane, make haste and tell us; make haste, my love.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "If we make haste," said Lydia, as they walked along, "perhaps we maysee something of Captain Carter before he goes.<>
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To the civil inquiries which thenpoured in, and amongst which she had the pleasure of distinguishing themuch superior solicitude of Mr. Bingley's, she could not make a veryfavourable answer.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "You observed it, Mr. Darcy, I am sure," said Miss Bingley; "and I aminclined to think that you would not wish to see your sister make suchan exhibition.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "If they had uncles enough to fill all Cheapside," cried Bingley, "itwould not make them one jot less agreeable.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "But I would really advise you to make your purchase in thatneighbourhood, and take Pemberley for a kind of model.<>
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When she was only fifteen, there was a man at my brotherGardiner's in town so much in love with her that my sister-in-law wassure he would make her an offer before we came away.<>
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I cannot be otherwise than concerned at being themeans of injuring your amiable daughters, and beg leave to apologise forit, as well as to assure you of my readiness to make them every possibleamends--but of this hereafter.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "There is some sense in what he says about the girls, however, and ifhe is disposed to make them any amends, I shall not be the person todiscourage him.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Though it is difficult," said Jane, "to guess in what way he can meanto make us the atonement he thinks our due, the wish is certainly to hiscredit.<>
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"I cannot make himout.<>
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She had also asked him twice to dine at Rosings,and had sent for him only the Saturday before, to make up her pool ofquadrille in the evening.<>
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This was exactly as it should be; for theyoung man wanted only regimentals to make him completely charming.<>
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" Some of them were to dine with the Phillipsesthe next day, and their aunt promised to make her husband call on Mr.Wickham, and give him an invitation also, if the family from Longbournwould come in the evening.<>
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Phillips began to express her concern thereupon,he assured her with much earnest gravity that it was not of the leastimportance, that he considered the money as a mere trifle, and beggedthat she would not make herself uneasy.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I know very well, madam," said he, "that when persons sit down to acard-table, they must take their chances of these things, and happily Iam not in such circumstances as to make five shillings any object.<>
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Mr. Collins might never make the offer, andtill he did, it was useless to quarrel about him.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) But Elizabeth was not formed for ill-humour; and though every prospectof her own was destroyed for the evening, it could not dwell long on herspirits; and having told all her griefs to Charlotte Lucas, whom she hadnot seen for a week, she was soon able to make a voluntary transitionto the oddities of her cousin, and to point him out to her particularnotice.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) When the dancing recommenced, however, and Darcy approached to claim herhand, Charlotte could not help cautioning her in a whisper, not to be asimpleton, and allow her fancy for Wickham to make her appear unpleasantin the eyes of a man ten times his consequence.<>
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I talkedabout the dance, and you ought to make some sort of remark on the sizeof the room, or the number of couples.<>
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"I am trying to make it out.<>
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On their being joined by Mr. Bingley himself, Elizabeth withdrewto Miss Lucas; to whose inquiry after the pleasantness of her lastpartner she had scarcely replied, before Mr. Collins came up to them,and told her with great exultation that he had just been so fortunate asto make a most important discovery.<>
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It wasnecessary to make this circumstance a matter of pleasure, because onsuch occasions it is the etiquette; but no one was less likely than Mrs.<>
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He assured her, that as to dancing, he was perfectly indifferent to it;that his chief object was by delicate attentions to recommend himself toher and that he should therefore make a point of remaining close to herthe whole evening.<>
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Bennet was most pressinglycivil in her hope of seeing the whole family soon at Longbourn, andaddressed herself especially to Mr. Bingley, to assure him how happy hewould make them by eating a family dinner with them at any time, withoutthe ceremony of a formal invitation.<>
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Having resolved to do it without loss of time, ashis leave of absence extended only to the following Saturday, and havingno feelings of diffidence to make it distressing to himself even atthe moment, he set about it in a very orderly manner, with all theobservances, which he supposed a regular part of the business.<>
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Choose properly, choosea gentlewoman for my sake; and for your own, let her be an active,useful sort of person, not brought up high, but able to make a smallincome go a good way.<>
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To fortune I am perfectly indifferent, andshall make no demand of that nature on your father, since I am wellaware that it could not be complied with; and that one thousand poundsin the four per cents, which will not be yours till after your mother'sdecease, is all that you may ever be entitled to.<>
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You could not make mehappy, and I am convinced that I am the last woman in the world whocould make you so.<>
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You must come and makeLizzy marry Mr. Collins, for she vows she will not have him, and if youdo not make haste he will change his mind and not have her.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "If we thought alike of Miss Bingley," replied Jane, "yourrepresentation of all this might make me quite easy.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) In as short a time as Mr. Collins's long speeches would allow,everything was settled between them to the satisfaction of both; and asthey entered the house he earnestly entreated her to name the day thatwas to make him the happiest of men; and though such a solicitation mustbe waived for the present, the lady felt no inclination to trifle withhis happiness.<>
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The stupidity with which he was favoured by nature mustguard his courtship from any charm that could make a woman wish for itscontinuance; and Miss Lucas, who accepted him solely from the pureand disinterested desire of an establishment, cared not how soon thatestablishment were gained.<>
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Lady Lucas began directly to calculate, with moreinterest than the matter had ever excited before, how many years longerMr. Bennet was likely to live; and Sir William gave it as his decidedopinion, that whenever Mr. Collins should be in possession of theLongbourn estate, it would be highly expedient that both he and his wifeshould make their appearance at St.<>
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The chief of every day was spent byhim at Lucas Lodge, and he sometimes returned to Longbourn only in timeto make an apology for his absence before the family went to bed.<>
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You do not make allowance enough for differenceof situation and temper.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I am far from attributing any part of Mr. Bingley's conduct to design,"said Elizabeth; "but without scheming to do wrong, or to make othersunhappy, there may be error, and there may be misery.<>
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By supposing such anaffection, you make everybody acting unnaturally and wrong, and me mostunhappy.<>
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The pain of separation, however, might be alleviated on hisside, by preparations for the reception of his bride; as he had reasonto hope, that shortly after his return into Hertfordshire, the day wouldbe fixed that was to make him the happiest of men.<>
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Without supposing them,from what she saw, to be very seriously in love, their preferenceof each other was plain enough to make her a little uneasy; andshe resolved to speak to Elizabeth on the subject before she leftHertfordshire, and represent to her the imprudence of encouraging suchan attachment.<>
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Do not involveyourself or endeavour to involve him in an affection which the wantof fortune would make so very imprudent.<>
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But I will endeavour to banish every painful thought,and think only of what will make me happy--your affection, and theinvariable kindness of my dear uncle and aunt.<>
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His character sunk onevery review of it; and as a punishment for him, as well as a possibleadvantage to Jane, she seriously hoped he might really soon marry Mr.Darcy's sister, as by Wickham's account, she would make him abundantlyregret what he had thrown away.<>
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His present pursuit could not make him forget thatElizabeth had been the first to excite and to deserve his attention, thefirst to listen and to pity, the first to be admired; and in his mannerof bidding her adieu, wishing her every enjoyment, reminding her ofwhat she was to expect in Lady Catherine de Bourgh, and trusting theiropinion of her--their opinion of everybody--would always coincide, therewas a solicitude, an interest which she felt must ever attach her tohim with a most sincere regard; and she parted from him convinced that,whether married or single, he must always be her model of the amiableand pleasing.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Her fellow-travellers the next day were not of a kind to make herthink him less agreeable.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth was prepared to see him in his glory; and she could not helpin fancying that in displaying the good proportion of the room, itsaspect and its furniture, he addressed himself particularly to her,as if wishing to make her feel what she had lost in refusing him.<>
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She openedthe door and met Maria in the landing place, who, breathless withagitation, cried out--"Oh, my dear Eliza! pray make haste and come into the dining-room, forthere is such a sight to be seen! I will not tell you what it is.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) When the ladies were separating for the toilette, he said to Elizabeth--"Do not make yourself uneasy, my dear cousin, about your apparel.<>
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James's Sir William was so completelyawed by the grandeur surrounding him, that he had but just courageenough to make a very low bow, and take his seat without saying a word;and his daughter, frightened almost out of her senses, sat on the edgeof her chair, not knowing which way to look.<>
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Her air was notconciliating, nor was her manner of receiving them such as to make hervisitors forget their inferior rank.<>
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Jenkinson to make up herparty.<>
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Where there is fortune to make the expenses oftravelling unimportant, distance becomes no evil.<>
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Collins knew not what to make of him.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Our habits of expense make us too dependent, and there are not manyin my rank of life who can afford to marry without some attention tomoney.<>
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To interrupta silence which might make him fancy her affected with what had passed,she soon afterwards said:"I imagine your cousin brought you down with him chiefly for the sake ofhaving someone at his disposal.<>
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Your superior knowledge of your sister must make the latterprobable.<>
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If your abhorrence of meshould make my assertions valueless, you cannot be prevented bythe same cause from confiding in my cousin; and that there may bethe possibility of consulting him, I shall endeavour to find someopportunity of putting this letter in your hands in the course of themorning.<>
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Again she readon; but every line proved more clearly that the affair, which she hadbelieved it impossible that any contrivance could so represent as torender Mr. Darcy's conduct in it less than infamous, was capable of aturn which must make him entirely blameless throughout the whole.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) After wandering along the lane for two hours, giving way to everyvariety of thought--re-considering events, determining probabilities,and reconciling herself, as well as she could, to a change so sudden andso important, fatigue, and a recollection of her long absence, madeher at length return home; and she entered the house with the wishof appearing cheerful as usual, and the resolution of repressing suchreflections as must make her unfit for conversation.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Chapter 37The two gentlemen left Rosings the next morning, and Mr. Collins havingbeen in waiting near the lodges, to make them his parting obeisance, wasable to bring home the pleasing intelligence, of their appearing in verygood health, and in as tolerable spirits as could be expected, after themelancholy scene so lately gone through at Rosings.<>
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To Rosings he thenhastened, to console Lady Catherine and her daughter; and on his returnbrought back, with great satisfaction, a message from her ladyship,importing that she felt herself so dull as to make her very desirous ofhaving them all to dine with her.<>
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Howgrievous then was the thought that, of a situation so desirable in everyrespect, so replete with advantage, so promising for happiness, Jane hadbeen deprived, by the folly and indecorum of her own family!When to these recollections was added the development of Wickham'scharacter, it may be easily believed that the happy spirits which hadseldom been depressed before, were now so much affected as to make italmost impossible for her to appear tolerably cheerful.<>
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Our plainmanner of living, our small rooms and few domestics, and the little wesee of the world, must make Hunsford extremely dull to a young lady likeyourself; but I hope you will believe us grateful for the condescension,and that we have done everything in our power to prevent your spendingyour time unpleasantly.<>
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Shehad spent six weeks with great enjoyment; and the pleasure of being withCharlotte, and the kind attentions she had received, must make herfeel the obliged.<>
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I shallpull it to pieces as soon as I get home, and see if I can make it up anybetter.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "This will not do," said Elizabeth; "you never will be able to make bothof them good for anything.<>
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There is but such a quantity of merit between them; justenough to make one good sort of man; and of late it has been shiftingabout pretty much.<>
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I want to be told whether Iought, or ought not, to make our acquaintances in general understandWickham's character.<>
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Mr. Darcy has not authorised meto make his communication public.<>
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We must not make him desperate.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "No; it would have been strange if they had; but I make no doubt theyoften talk of it between themselves.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) In vain did Elizabeth attempt to make her reasonable, and Jane to makeher resigned.<>
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As for Elizabeth herself, this invitation was so far fromexciting in her the same feelings as in her mother and Lydia, that sheconsidered it as the death warrant of all possibility of common sensefor the latter; and detestable as such a step must make her were itknown, she could not help secretly advising her father not to let hergo.<>
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Vain,ignorant, idle, and absolutely uncontrolled! Oh! my dear father, can yousuppose it possible that they will not be censured and despised whereverthey are known, and that their sisters will not be often involved in thedisgrace?"Mr. Bennet saw that her whole heart was in the subject, andaffectionately taking her hand said in reply:"Do not make yourself uneasy, my love.<>
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Bennetwas restored to her usual querulous serenity; and, by the middle ofJune, Kitty was so much recovered as to be able to enter Meryton withouttears; an event of such happy promise as to make Elizabeth hope that bythe following Christmas she might be so tolerably reasonable as not tomention an officer above once a day, unless, by some cruel and maliciousarrangement at the War Office, another regiment should be quartered inMeryton.<>
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She wanted to ascertain thefeelings of each of her visitors; she wanted to compose her own, andto make herself agreeable to all; and in the latter object, where shefeared most to fail, she was most sure of success, for those to whom sheendeavoured to give pleasure were prepossessed in her favour.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) As for Elizabeth, her thoughts were at Pemberley this evening more thanthe last; and the evening, though as it passed it seemed long, was notlong enough to determine her feelings towards one in that mansion;and she lay awake two whole hours endeavouring to make them out.<>
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Had Miss Bingley known whatpain she was then giving her beloved friend, she undoubtedly wouldhave refrained from the hint; but she had merely intended to discomposeElizabeth by bringing forward the idea of a man to whom she believedher partial, to make her betray a sensibility which might injure her inDarcy's opinion, and, perhaps, to remind the latter of all the folliesand absurdities by which some part of her family were connectedwith that corps.<>
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I am afraid you will not be able to make it out, but I hardlyknow what I have written.<>
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Itwas, on the contrary, exactly calculated to make her understand her ownwishes; and never had she so honestly felt that she could have lovedhim, as now, when all love must be vain.<>
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And what claims has Lydia--what attraction has shebeyond youth, health, and good humour that could make him, for her sake,forego every chance of benefiting himself by marrying well? As to whatrestraint the apprehensions of disgrace in the corps might throw on adishonourable elopement with her, I am not able to judge; for I knownothing of the effects that such a step might produce.<>
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As that was thecase, neither Jane, to whom I related the whole, nor I, thought itnecessary to make our knowledge public; for of what use couldit apparently be to any one, that the good opinion which all theneighbourhood had of him should then be overthrown? And even when it wassettled that Lydia should go with Mrs.<>
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And now do, when you get to town, find them out,wherever they may be; and if they are not married already, make themmarry.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) In the dining-room they were soon joined by Mary and Kitty, who had beentoo busily engaged in their separate apartments to make their appearancebefore.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth lifted up her eyes in amazement, but was too much oppressedto make any reply.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) You need not send them word at Longbourn of mygoing, if you do not like it, for it will make the surprise the greater,when I write to them and sign my name 'Lydia Wickham.<>
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Pray make my excuses toPratt for not keeping my engagement, and dancing with him to-night.<>
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It had comewith a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of agentleman and lady's removing from one carriage into another mightbe remarked he meant to make inquiries at Clapham.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) If he could anyhowdiscover at what house the coachman had before set down his fare, hedetermined to make inquiries there, and hoped it might not be impossibleto find out the stand and number of the coach.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth, though she did not credit abovehalf of what was said, believed enough to make her former assurance ofher sister's ruin more certain; and even Jane, who believed still lessof it, became almost hopeless, more especially as the time was now comewhen, if they had gone to Scotland, which she had never before entirelydespaired of, they must in all probability have gained some news ofthem.<>
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Who is to fight Wickham,and make him marry her, if he comes away?"As Mrs.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Well, well," said he, "do not make yourself unhappy.<>
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They are not married, nor can I find therewas any intention of being so; but if you are willing to perform theengagements which I have ventured to make on your side, I hope it willnot be long before they are.<>
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By this time she isactually with them! If such goodness does not make her miserable now,she will never deserve to be happy! What a meeting for her, when shefirst sees my aunt!""We must endeavour to forget all that has passed on either side," saidJane: "I hope and trust they will yet be happy.<>
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Their mutual affection will steady them; and I flatter myselfthey will settle so quietly, and live in so rational a manner, as may intime make their past imprudence forgotten.<>
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Girls, can I doanything for you in Meryton? Oh! Here comes Hill! My dear Hill, have youheard the good news? Miss Lydia is going to be married; and you shallall have a bowl of punch to make merry at her wedding.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth was now most heartily sorry that she had, from the distress ofthe moment, been led to make Mr. Darcy acquainted with their fears forher sister; for since her marriage would so shortly give theproper termination to the elopement, they might hope to conceal itsunfavourable beginning from all those who were not immediately on thespot.<>
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"It must make you better satisfied that your other four aresingle.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) Elizabeth did not know what to make of it.<>
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It drew from her,however, the exertion of speaking, which nothing else had so effectuallydone before; and she asked Bingley whether he meant to make any stay inthe country at present.<>
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At that instant, she feltthat years of happiness could not make Jane or herself amends formoments of such painful confusion.<>
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She knew how littlesuch a situation would give pleasure to either, or make either appear toadvantage.<>
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They were confined for the evening at different tables, and she hadnothing to hope, but that his eyes were so often turned towards her sideof the room, as to make him play as unsuccessfully as herself.<>
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Bennet, in short, was in very great spirits; she had seen enough ofBingley's behaviour to Jane, to be convinced that she would get him atlast; and her expectations of advantage to her family, when in a happyhumour, were so far beyond reason, that she was quite disappointed atnot seeing him there again the next day, to make his proposals.<>
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Forgiveme; and if you persist in indifference, do not make me your confidante.<>
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Bennet to her daughter's room, in her dressinggown, and with her hair half finished, crying out:"My dear Jane, make haste and hurry down.<>
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Make haste, make haste.<>
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Her youngersisters soon began to make interest with her for objects of happinesswhich she might in future be able to dispense.<>
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They proceeded in silence along the gravel walkthat led to the copse; Elizabeth was determined to make no effort forconversation with a woman who was now more than usually insolent anddisagreeable.<>
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Though Iknow it must be a scandalous falsehood, though I would not injure himso much as to suppose the truth of it possible, I instantly resolvedon setting off for this place, that I might make my sentiments known toyou.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "That will make your ladyship's situation at present more pitiable;but it will have no effect on me.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "And will you promise me, never to enter into such an engagement?""I will make no promise of the kind.<>
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Your ladyship wants Mr. Darcy to marryyour daughter; but would my giving you the wished-for promise make theirmarriage at all more probable? Supposing him to be attached to me, wouldmy refusing to accept his hand make him wish to bestow it on his cousin?Allow me to say, Lady Catherine, that the arguments with which you havesupported this extraordinary application have been as frivolous as theapplication was ill-judged.<>
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You are determined to ruin him inthe opinion of all his friends, and make him the contempt of the world.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) If he had been wavering before as to what he should do, which had oftenseemed likely, the advice and entreaty of so near a relation mightsettle every doubt, and determine him at once to be as happy as dignityunblemished could make him.<>
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For what do welive, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in ourturn?""Oh!" cried Elizabeth, "I am excessively diverted.<>
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Had they fixed on any other manit would have been nothing; but his perfect indifference, and yourpointed dislike, make it so delightfully absurd! Much as I abominatewriting, I would not give up Mr. Collins's correspondence for anyconsideration.<>
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Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make herfeelings appear what they were not.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "I was certainly very far from expecting them to make so strong animpression.<>
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"Did it," said he, "did it soon make youthink better of me? Did you, on reading it, give any credit to itscontents?"She explained what its effect on her had been, and how gradually all herformer prejudices had been removed.<>
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I can remember some expressions which mightjustly make you hate me.<>
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Itold him of all that had occurred to make my former interference in hisaffairs absurd and impertinent.<>
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But will they make you happy?""Have you any other objection," said Elizabeth, "than your belief of myindifference?""None at all.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Was there no good in your affectionate behaviour to Jane while she wasill at Netherfield?""Dearest Jane! who could have done less for her? But make a virtue of itby all means.<>
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(Jane Austen - Pride and prejudice ) "Lady Catherine has been of infinite use, which ought to make her happy,for she loves to be of use.<>
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But tell me, what did you come down toNetherfield for? Was it merely to ride to Longbourn and be embarrassed?or had you intended any more serious consequence?""My real purpose was to see you, and to judge, if I could, whether Imight ever hope to make you love me.<>
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My avowed one, or what I avowed tomyself, was to see whether your sister were still partial to Bingley,and if she were, to make the confession to him which I have since made.<>
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Nor was her respect for him, though it made her more quiet, at alllikely to make her more elegant.<>
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I wish I could say, for the sake of her family, that theaccomplishment of her earnest desire in the establishment of so manyof her children produced so happy an effect as to make her a sensible,amiable, well-informed woman for the rest of her life; though perhaps itwas lucky for her husband, who might not have relished domestic felicityin so unusual a form, that she still was occasionally nervous andinvariably silly.<>
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He bore with philosophy the conviction thatElizabeth must now become acquainted with whatever of his ingratitudeand falsehood had before been unknown to her; and in spite of everything, was not wholly without hope that Darcy might yet be prevailed onto make his fortune.<>
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) He had feltsome pride--he acknowledged it freely, and let his enemies make the mostof it--he had felt some pride when he presented his Tittlebatian Theoryto the world; it might be celebrated or it might not.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Now it so happened that Mr. Pickwick and his three companions hadresolved to make Rochester their first halting-place too; and havingintimated to their new-found acquaintance that they were journeying tothe same city, they agreed to occupy the seat at the back of the coach,where they could all sit together.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'No names at all;' and then he whispered Mr. Tupman, 'names won'tdo--not known--very good names in their way, but not great ones--capitalnames for a small party, but won't make an impression in publicassemblies--incog.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'With a doctor--Doctor Slammer, of the 97th,' said Mr. Winkle, wishingto make the matter appear as solemn as possible; 'an affair with anofficer, seconded by another officer, at sunset this evening, in alonely field beyond Fort Pitt.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'To be before the footlights,' continued the dismal man, 'is likesitting at a grand court show, and admiring the silken dresses ofthe gaudy throng; to be behind them is to be the people who make thatfinery, uncared for and unknown, and left to sink or swim, to starve orlive, as fortune wills it.<>
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The best way is tokeep gently up with the object of pursuit, to be wary and cautious, towatch your opportunity well, get gradually before it, then make a rapiddive, seize it by the crown, and stick it firmly on your head; smilingpleasantly all the time, as if you thought it as good a joke as anybodyelse.<>
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Joe, make room for one of these gentlemen on the box.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Now make haste,' said Mr. Wardle; for the fat boy was hanging fondlyover a capon, which he seemed wholly unable to part with.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Come, come,' said the bustling host, with a natural anxiety to changethe conversation, 'what say you to a rubber, Mr. Pickwick?I should like it of all things,' replied that gentleman; 'but praydon't make up one on my account.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The evening glided swiftly away, in these cheerful recreations; and whenthe substantial though homely supper had been despatched, and the littleparty formed a social circle round the fire, Mr. Pickwick thought hehad never felt so happy in his life, and at no time so much disposed toenjoy, and make the most of, the passing moment.<>
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You did make some notes, I think, about John Edmunds, did you not?'inquired Mr. Wardle, who appeared very desirous to draw his friend out,for the edification of his new visitors.<>
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He had not courage to make inquiries, orto present himself to the only person who was likely to receive him withkindness and compassion.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I wants to make your flesh creep,' replied the boy.<>
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It was impossibleto make any great way against such obstacles united; it was hard uponone o'clock already; and nearly two hours were consumed in getting tothe end of the stage.<>
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Come along! Make haste!'And before Mr. Pickwick knew precisely what he was about, he felthimself forced in at the other door, by one pull from the old gentlemanand one push from the hostler; and off they were again.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) He was yet on his way to the White Hart, when two plump gentlemanand one thin one entered the yard, and looked round in search of someauthorised person of whom they could make a few inquiries.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Oh, wery well, Sir,' replied Sam, 'we shan't be bankrupts, and weshan't make our fort'ns.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I'll make it payable the day after to-morrow,' said the littleman, with a look towards Mr. Wardle; 'and we can get the lady away,meanwhile.<>
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It alsoappears that a skilful artist executed a faithful delineation of thecuriosity, which was engraven on stone, and presented to the RoyalAntiquarian Society, and other learned bodies: that heart-burnings andjealousies without number were created by rival controversies which werepenned upon the subject; and that Mr. Pickwick himself wrote a pamphlet,containing ninety-six pages of very small print, and twenty-sevendifferent readings of the inscription: that three old gentlemen cut offtheir eldest sons with a shilling a-piece for presuming to doubt theantiquity of the fragment; and that one enthusiastic individual cuthimself off prematurely, in despair at being unable to fathom itsmeaning: that Mr. Pickwick was elected an honorary member of seventeennative and foreign societies, for making the discovery: that none of theseventeen could make anything of it; but that all the seventeen agreedit was very extraordinary.<>
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I am mosthappy, sir, to make the acquaintance of such a man.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Why, I am afraid it wouldn't,' replied the agent; 'if it were done byyourself, my dear Sir, I think it would make you very popular.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'The wind blew--not up the road or down it, though that's bad enough,but sheer across it, sending the rain slanting down like the lines theyused to rule in the copy-books at school, to make the boys slope well.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'In less than five minutes' time, Tom was ensconced in the room oppositethe bar--the very room where he had imagined the fire blazing--before asubstantial, matter-of-fact, roaring fire, composed of something shortof a bushel of coals, and wood enough to make half a dozen decentgooseberry bushes, piled half-way up the chimney, and roaring andcrackling with a sound that of itself would have warmed the heart ofany reasonable man.<>
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He couldn't make anything of it though, so he got into bed,covered himself up warm, and fell asleep.<>
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I shall be extremely happy to make the acquaintance of such a lady,sir,' replied Mr. Pickwick.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You SHALL make it, sir,' said the grave man.<>
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Leo Hunter, 'I must make you promise not tostir from my side the whole day.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'In the first place, here are my little girls; I had almost forgottenthem,' said Minerva, carelessly pointing towards a couple of full-grownyoung ladies, of whom one might be about twenty, and the other a yearor two older, and who were dressed in very juvenile costumes--whetherto make them look young, or their mamma younger, Mr. Pickwick does notdistinctly inform us.<>
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This interesting performancehaving concluded amidst the loud plaudits of the whole company, a boyforthwith proceeded to entangle himself with the rails of a chair,and to jump over it, and crawl under it, and fall down with it, and doeverything but sit upon it, and then to make a cravat of his legs, andtie them round his neck, and then to illustrate the ease with which ahuman being can be made to look like a magnified toad--all which featsyielded high delight and satisfaction to the assembled spectators.<>
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Pray make room, to let Mr. Fitz-Marshall pass.<>
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Let me order you a snug littledinner, and make my inquiries below while it's a-getting ready; I couldworm ev'ry secret out O' the boots's heart, in five minutes, Sir.<>
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But though he was afraid to make up to them, he couldn't bear to losesight of them; so when they walked faster he walked faster, when theylingered he lingered, and when they stopped he stopped; and so theymight have gone on, until the darkness prevented them, if Kate had notlooked slyly back, and encouragingly beckoned Nathaniel to advance.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Nathaniel Pipkin could make no reply, so old Lobbs shook him backwardsand forwards, for two or three minutes, by way of arranging his ideasfor him.<>
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He returned Mr. Pott's gaze of stone, and in compliancewith that gentleman's request, proceeded to make the most he couldof the 'serpent.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You mustn't handle your piece in that 'ere way, when you come to havethe charge in it, Sir,' said the tall gamekeeper gruffly; 'or I'm damnedif you won't make cold meat of some on us.<>
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And more than that," says he, "I can make a weal abeef-steak, or a beef-steak a kidney, or any one on 'em a mutton, at aminute's notice, just as the market changes, and appetites wary!"He must have been a very ingenious young man, that, Sam,' said Mr.Pickwick, with a slight shudder.<>
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Pray do it, Sir, if youwould; we will not make the smallest resistance.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) At first the evolutions of the stout man had escaped Mr. Weller'sobservation, but by degrees, as he saw Mr. Pickwick's eyes every now andthen turning towards him, he began to gaze in the same direction, at thesame time shading his eyes with his hand, as if he partially recognisedthe object before him, and wished to make quite sure of its identity.<>
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It's the only way to make a boysharp, sir.<>
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"I'll make the other roommy bedchamber, and this my sitting-room.<>
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"I can't make this out,"said he, when he came home from the play one night, and was drinking aglass of cold grog, with his back to the wall, in order that he mightn'tbe able to fancy there was any one behind him--"I can't make it out,"said he; and just then his eyes rested on the little closet that hadbeen always locked up, and a shudder ran through his whole frame fromtop to toe.<>
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Well, he had moved in allhis furniture--it wasn't quite a truck-full--and had sprinkled it aboutthe room, so as to make the four chairs look as much like a dozen aspossible, and was sitting down before the fire at night, drinking thefirst glass of two gallons of whisky he had ordered on credit, wonderingwhether it would ever be paid for, and if so, in how many years' time,when his eyes encountered the glass doors of the wooden press.<>
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How soonhave those same eyes, deeply sunken in the head, glared from faceswasted with famine, and sallow from confinement, in days when it was nofigure of speech to say that debtors rotted in prison, with no hope ofrelease, and no prospect of liberty! The atrocity in its full extentno longer exists, but there is enough of it left to give rise tooccurrences that make the heart bleed.<>
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Topics of conversationwere never wanting, for even when any pause occurred in Mr. Weller'sloquacity, it was abundantly supplied by the desire evinced by Mr.Magnus to make himself acquainted with the whole of the personal historyof his fellow-travellers, and his loudly-expressed anxiety at everystage, respecting the safety and well-being of the two bags, the leatherhat-box, and the brown-paper parcel.<>
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Why, then, he-he-he!' said Mr. Peter Magnus, with a bashful titter,'what should you think, Mr. Pickwick, if I had come down here to make aproposal, Sir, eh? He, he, he!Think! That you are very likely to succeed,' replied Mr. Pickwick, withone of his beaming smiles.<>
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There was a momentary look of deep slyness in Job Trotter's eye, as hesaid this, which ran a thrill through Mr. Weller's clenched fist, ashe burned with a desire to make a demonstration on his ribs.<>
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Mr. Pickwick, I beg to make you knownto Miss Witherfield.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) If the middle-aged lady had mingled much with the busy world, or hadprofited at all by the manners and customs of those who make the lawsand set the fashions, she would have known that this sort of ferocityis the most harmless thing in nature; but as she had lived for the mostpart in the country, and never read the parliamentary debates, shewas little versed in these particular refinements of civilised life.<>
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He was immediatelysurrounded and secured; and it is but common justice both to him and Mr.Winkle to say, that they did not make the slightest attempt to rescueeither themselves or Mr. Weller; who, after a most vigorous resistance,was overpowered by numbers and taken prisoner.<>
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Why,' said Mr. Nupkins, 'that might be very easily done, for he willbe here to-night, and then there would be no occasion to make the matterpublic, just--just--for the young man's own sake, you know.<>
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So Mr. Pickwick and his friends, having washed off allmarks of their late encounter, were introduced to the ladies, and soonafterwards to their dinner; and Mr. Weller, whom the magistrate, withhis peculiar sagacity, had discovered in half an hour to be one of thefinest fellows alive, was consigned to the care and guardianship of Mr.Muzzle, who was specially enjoined to take him below, and make much ofhim.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Now, the cook no sooner heard the concluding words of this desperatechallenge, and saw Mr. Muzzle about to put it into execution, than sheuttered a loud and piercing shriek; and rushing on Mr. Job Trotter, whorose from his chair on the instant, tore and buffeted his large flatface, with an energy peculiar to excited females, and twining her handsin his long black hair, tore therefrom about enough to make five or sixdozen of the very largest-sized mourning-rings.<>
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Tupman, Winkle,and Snodgrass repaired to their several homes to make such preparationsas might be requisite for their forthcoming visit to Dingley Dell;and Mr. Pickwick and Sam took up their present abode in very good,old-fashioned, and comfortable quarters, to wit, the George and VultureTavern and Hotel, George Yard, Lombard Street.<>
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I don't wish to say anything to make you uncomfortable,young man, but your master's an old brute, and I wish I had him here totell him so.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'To see how dreadful she takes on, going moping about, and taking nopleasure in nothing, except when her friends comes in, out of charity,to sit with her, and make her comfortable,' resumed Mrs.<>
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Hows'ever, there is law for us women, mis'rablecreeturs as they'd make us, if they could; and that your master willfind out, young man, to his cost, afore he's six months older.<>
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It camefrom a rather stout lady of comfortable appearance, who was seatedbeside the fireplace in the bar, blowing the fire to make the kettleboil for tea.<>
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The moment he saw him eat, all doubt onthe subject was removed, and he perceived at once that if he purposedto take up his temporary quarters where he was, he must make his footinggood without delay.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Borrows eighteenpence on Monday, and comes on Tuesday for a shillin' tomake it up half-a-crown; calls again on Vensday for another half-crownto make it five shillin's; and goes on, doubling, till he gets it up toa five pund note in no time, like them sums in the 'rithmetic book 'boutthe nails in the horse's shoes, Sammy.<>
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And if he ain't got enough out on 'em, Sammy, to make him freeof the water company for life,' said Mr. Weller, in conclusion, 'I'm oneDutchman, and you're another, and that's all about it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) But if they were social and happy outside the house, what was the warmthand cordiality of their reception when they reached the farm! Thevery servants grinned with pleasure at sight of Mr. Pickwick; andEmma bestowed a half-demure, half-impudent, and all-pretty look ofrecognition, on Mr. Tupman, which was enough to make the statue ofBonaparte in the passage, unfold his arms, and clasp her within them.<>
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No doubt of that, ma'am,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'and that's the reason whyI would make much of the few that have any traces of the old stock'--andsaying this, Mr. Pickwick gently pulled Bella towards him, and bestowinga kiss upon her forehead, bade her sit down on the little stool at hergrandmother's feet.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Gabriel Grub was paralysed, and could make no reply.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'That you sent him up to the plaintiff 's to make some offer of acompromise, I suppose,' replied Perker.<>
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The marks of hairpowder on his coat-collar, and the ill-washed and worsetied white neckerchief round his throat, showed that he had not foundleisure since he left the court to make any alteration in his dress;while the slovenly style of the remainder of his costume warranted theinference that his personal appearance would not have been very muchimproved if he had.<>
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Thenp'raps, Sir, you'll confine yourself to breaking the arms and legs ofthe poor people in the hospitals, and keep yourself TO yourself, Sir, orthere may be some persons here as will make you, Sir.<>
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But will you have the goodness just to call methat again, sir?I didn't make use of the word in any invidious sense, ma'am,' repliedMr. Benjamin Allen, growing somewhat uneasy on his own account.<>
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But who do you call a woman? Did you make thatremark to me, sir?Why, bless my heart!' said Mr. Benjamin Allen.<>
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" He gave the child a shaketo make him obedient, and such a rattling ensued as nobody ever heardbefore.<>
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The prim man in thecloth boots, who had been unsuccessfully attempting to make a jokeduring the whole time the round game lasted, saw his opportunity, andavailed himself of it.<>
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"That's a wery pretty sentiment,' said the elder Mr. Weller, removinghis pipe to make way for the remark.<>
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I've beena-turnin' the bis'ness over in my mind, and he may make his-self easy,Sammy.<>
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The little judgelooked doubtful, and said he'd make a note of it.<>
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You were on thestaircase, and didn't distinctly hear; but you will not swear thatPickwick did not make use of the expressions I have quoted? Do Iunderstand that?No, I will not,' replied Mr. Winkle; and down sat Mr. Skimpin with atriumphant countenance.<>
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Mr. Winkle had not yet sufficientlyrecovered the recollection of his evidence at the trial, to make anyobservation on any subject, so Mr. Pickwick paused in vain.<>
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,took Mr. Pickwick's hand; retaining it in his, meantime, and shruggingup his shoulders with a constant succession of bows, as if he reallycould not make up his mind to the trial of letting it go again.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'A very singular young man that,' said the powdered-headed footman,looking after Mr. Weller, with a countenance which clearly showed hecould make nothing of him.<>
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Mingled with these groups, were three or four match-makingmammas, appearing to be wholly absorbed by the conversation in whichthey were taking part, but failing not from time to time to cast ananxious sidelong glance upon their daughters, who, remembering thematernal injunction to make the best use of their youth, had alreadycommenced incipient flirtations in the mislaying scarves, putting ongloves, setting down cups, and so forth; slight matters apparently,but which may be turned to surprisingly good account by expertpractitioners.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Just at the very moment of their entrance, the Dowager Lady Snuphanuphand two other ladies of an ancient and whist-like appearance, werehovering over an unoccupied card-table; and they no sooner set eyesupon Mr. Pickwick under the convoy of Angelo Bantam, than they exchangedglances with each other, seeing that he was precisely the very personthey wanted, to make up the rubber.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'My dear Bantam,' said the Dowager Lady Snuphanuph coaxingly, 'findus some nice creature to make up this table; there's a good soul.<>
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To make quite certain, however, he remained quiet in bed forten minutes or so, and listened; and when he had counted two orthree-and-thirty knocks, he felt quite satisfied, and gave himself agreat deal of credit for being so wakeful.<>
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Craddock had heard the knocking and the voices at last; and,only waiting to put something smarter on her head than her nightcap,ran down into the front drawing-room to make sure that it was the rightparty.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) Dowler came up to the outside of the door; avowed, through the keyhole,his steadfast determination of cutting Mr. Winkle's throat next day;and, after a great confusion of voices in the drawing-room, amidst whichthat of Mr. Pickwick was distinctly heard endeavouring to make peace,the inmates dispersed to their several bed-chambers, and all was quietonce more.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I feel a great delicacy, gentlemen, in coming for'ard,' said the man inthe long coat, 'having the misforchune to be a coachman, and being onlyadmitted as a honorary member of these agreeable swarrys, but I dofeel myself bound, gentlemen--drove into a corner, if I may use theexpression--to make known an afflicting circumstance which has cometo my knowledge; which has happened I may say within the soap of myeveryday contemplation.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) There was no singing, because Mr. Bob Sawyer said it wouldn't lookprofessional; but to make amends for this deprivation there was so muchtalking and laughing that it might have been heard, and very likely was,at the end of the street.<>
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Mr. Winkle then recounted what had passed between himself and Mr. BenAllen, relative to Arabella; stated that his object was to gain aninterview with the young lady, and make a formal disclosure of hispassion; and declared his conviction, founded on certain dark hintsand mutterings of the aforesaid Ben, that, wherever she was at presentimmured, it was somewhere near the Downs.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'It may seem wery strange talkin' to me about these here affairs, miss,'said Sam, with great vehemence; 'but all I can say is, that I'm not onlyready but villin' to do anythin' as'll make matters agreeable; and ifchuckin' either o' them sawboneses out o' winder 'ull do it, I'm theman.<>
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Mr. Weller touched his hat, as an earnest of his obedience, and withdrewto make all needful preparations for the expedition.<>
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He was up again in an instant however; and bidding Mr. Winkle make hasteand get the interview over, ran out into the lane to keep watch, withall the courage and ardour of youth.<>
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If not, I must make the best I can of that.<>
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There were yetanother class of persons--those who were waiting to attend summonsestheir employers had taken out, which it was optional to the attorney onthe opposite side to attend or not--and whose business it was, from timeto time, to cry out the opposite attorney's name; to make certain thathe was not in attendance without their knowledge.<>
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Walk in, sir, and make yourself at home.<>
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Mr. Pickwick winced a good deal underthe operation, and appeared to sit very uneasily in his chair; but hemade no remark to anybody while it was being performed, not even toSam, who reclined upon the back of the chair, reflecting, partly on thesituation of his master, and partly on the great satisfaction it wouldhave afforded him to make a fierce assault upon all the turnkeys thereassembled, one after the other, if it were lawful and peaceable so todo.<>
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It would make any one go to sleep, that bedstead would, whetherthey wanted to or not.<>
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20, Coffee-room Flight": and that wos true, sure enough,for wen he wanted to make the acquaintance of any new-comer, he used topull out a little limp card vith them words on it and nothin' else; inconsideration of vich, he vos alvays called Number Tventy.<>
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After a few thoughtful turns in the Painted Ground, which, as it was nowdark, was nearly deserted, he intimated to Mr. Weller that he thoughtit high time for him to withdraw for the night; requesting him to seeka bed in some adjacent public-house, and return early in the morning,to make arrangements for the removal of his master's wardrobe from theGeorge and Vulture.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) All this was very genteel and pleasant; and, to make matters still morecomfortable, Mr. Smangle assured Mr. Pickwick a great many more timesthat he entertained a very high respect for the feelings of a gentleman;which sentiment, indeed, did him infinite credit, as he could be in nowise supposed to understand them.<>
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But I think, perhaps, ifsomebody went down, just to see that he didn't dip his beak into the jugby accident, or make some confounded mistake in losing the money as hecame upstairs, it would be as well.<>
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What the word was, Mr. Pickwick could not distinguish; but herather inferred that it must be some nickname which distinguished Mr.Martin, from the fact of a great number of gentlemen on the groundbelow, immediately proceeding to cry 'Butcher!' in imitation of the tonein which that useful class of society are wont, diurnally, to make theirpresence known at area railings.<>
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Is the vay-bill all clear and straight for'erd?The schedule, sir,' said Pell, guessing at Mr. Weller's meaning, 'theschedule is as plain and satisfactory as pen and ink can make it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Will you allow me to in-quire wy you make up your bed under that 'eredeal table?' said Sam.<>
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By the bye--'As Smangle pronounced the last three words, he stopped suddenly,reclosed the door which he had opened, and, walking softly back to Mr.Pickwick, stepped close up to him on tiptoe, and said, in a very softwhisper--'You couldn't make it convenient to lend me half-a-crown till the latterend of next week, could you?'Mr. Pickwick could scarcely forbear smiling, but managing to preservehis gravity, he drew forth the coin, and placed it in Mr. Smangle'spalm; upon which, that gentleman, with many nods and winks, implyingprofound mystery, disappeared in quest of the three strangers, with whomhe presently returned; and having coughed thrice, and nodded as manytimes, as an assurance to Mr. Pickwick that he would not forget to pay,he shook hands all round, in an engaging manner, and at length tookhimself off.<>
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I have no right to make any further inquiry into the private affairs ofa friend, however intimate a friend,' said Mr. Pickwick, after a shortsilence; 'at present let me merely say, that I do not understand this atall.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You make my blood run cold,' said Mr. Pickwick.<>
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Blessed, if they was a-callin' me to the bar, theycouldn't make more noise about it!'Accompanying these words with a gentle rap on the head of the younggentleman before noticed, who, unconscious of his close vicinity tothe person in request, was screaming 'Weller!' with all his might, Samhastened across the ground, and ran up the steps into the hall.<>
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Set down, Sir, ve make no extra charge for settin' down, as theking remarked wen he blowed up his ministers.<>
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I'm wery much mistaken if that 'ere Jingle worn'ta-doin somethin' in the water-cart way!'The area formed by the wall in that part of the Fleet in which Mr.Pickwick stood was just wide enough to make a good racket-court; oneside being formed, of course, by the wall itself, and the other by thatportion of the prison which looked (or rather would have looked, but forthe wall) towards St.<>
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The body! It is the lawyer's term for therestless, whirling mass of cares and anxieties, affections, hopes, andgriefs, that make up the living man.<>
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DODSON AND FOGGIt was within a week of the close of the month of July, that a hackneycabriolet, number unrecorded, was seen to proceed at a rapid pace upGoswell Street; three people were squeezed into it besides the driver,who sat in his own particular little dickey at the side; over the apronwere hung two shawls, belonging to two small vixenish-looking ladiesunder the apron; between whom, compressed into a very small compass, wasstowed away, a gentleman of heavy and subdued demeanour, who, wheneverhe ventured to make an observation, was snapped up short by one of thevixenish ladies before-mentioned.<>
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Why doesn'the make haste!'As the lady spoke these words, Mr. Jackson turned from the coach wherehe had been addressing some observations to a shabby man in blackleggings, who had just emerged from the vehicle with a thick ash stickin his hand, and made his way to the place where the ladies were seated;winding his hair round the brim of his hat, as he came along.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I wouldn't make too sure o' that, Sir,' urged Mr. Weller, shaking hishead.<>
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They knock me up, at all hours of the night; they takemedicine to an extent which I should have conceived impossible; they puton blisters and leeches with a perseverance worthy of a better cause;they make additions to their families, in a manner which is quite awful.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'You must make yourself, with as little delay as possible, master ofArabella's one thousand pounds.<>
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I wish to make a wery few remarks in addition to wot has been putfor'ard by the honourable gen'l'm'n as has jist give over,' said Mr.Weller, stepping forth, 'wich is this here: a indiwidual in company hascalled me a feller.<>
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He used to go back for aweek, just to look up his old friends; and what with breakfasting withthis one, lunching with that, dining with the third, and supping withanother, a pretty tight week he used to make of it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'Yes,' replied Bob Sawyer, 'and a regular expedition we'll make of it.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'I wonder,' said Mr. Pickwick, stopping in the midst of a most sedateconversation with Ben Allen, bearing reference to the numerous goodqualities of Mr. Winkle and his sister--'I wonder what all the people wepass, can see in us to make them stare so.<>
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If they persist in accompanying me, I must make the interview asbrief as possible, and be content that, for their own sakes, they willnot expose themselves.<>
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I am very happy to find that you do me the justice to make theadmission, sir,' said Mr. Winkle, senior, looking contemptuously at BenAllen, who was shaking his head profoundly.<>
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Lights in the Sun, John; make up the fire; the gentlemen are wet!'cried the landlord.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The buxom female shook her head with a compassionate and sympathisingair; and, appealing to Sam, inquired whether his father really oughtnot to make an effort to keep up, and not give way to that lowness ofspirits.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) The elder Mr. Weller, who still continued to make various strange anduncouth attempts to appear asleep, offered not a single word duringthese proceedings; but when Stiggins stopped for breath, he darted uponhim, and snatching the tumbler from his hand, threw the remainder of therum-and-water in his face, and the glass itself into the grate.<>
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If not, I have thought of half a dozenplans, any one of which would make you happy at once.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) 'We shall make Mr. Pickwick pay for peeping,' said Fogg, withconsiderable native humour, as he unfolded his papers.<>
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Both my girls are pictures of their dear mother, and as I growold I like to sit with only them by me; for their voices and looks carryme back to the happiest period of my life, and make me, for the moment,as young as I used to be then, though not quite so light-hearted.<>
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There now, Mr. Pickwick, if you can make it convenient to reduce youreyes to their usual size again, and to let me hear what you think weought to do, I shall feel rather obliged to you!'The testy manner in which the hearty old gentleman uttered this lastsentence was not wholly unwarranted; for Mr. Pickwick's face had settleddown into an expression of blank amazement and perplexity, quite curiousto behold.<>
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The unfortunate youth had only interchanged a dozen words with Mr.Snodgrass, that gentleman having implored him to make a privateappeal to some friend to release him, and then pushed him out with thesnuff-box, lest his prolonged absence should lead to a discovery.<>
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Where everybody took soactive a part, it is almost invidious to make a distinction; but if oneindividual evinced greater powers than another, it was the coachman withthe hoarse voice, who took an imperial pint of vinegar with his oysters,without betraying the least emotion.<>
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We want to make alittle transfer, if you please.<>
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I shall be proud, Sam,' said Mr.Pickwick, whose voice had faltered a little hitherto, but now resumedits customary tone, 'proud and happy to make your future prospects inlife my grateful and peculiar care.<>
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Then, that's the wery best reason wy youshould alvays have somebody by you as understands you, to keep you upand make you comfortable.<>
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Shall I make any more apologies, Mr. Pickwick?Not one,' replied that gentleman.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) In addition to these points of distraction, Wardle was intrustedwith two small letters to two small young ladies who were to act asbridesmaids; upon the receipt of which, the two young ladies were drivento despair by having no 'things' ready for so important an occasion, andno time to make them in--a circumstance which appeared to afford thetwo worthy papas of the two small young ladies rather a feeling ofsatisfaction than otherwise.<>
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( Dickens The Pickwick papers ) It is the fate of most men who mingle with the world, and attain eventhe prime of life, to make many real friends, and lose them in thecourse of nature.<>
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(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "An interviewer might very well get over the wall," he said, "for Icouldn't make anybody hear at the front door.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Did he," asked Underhill, "give any excuse for his curious way ofslipping in?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) 'No, none that I can make sense of," answered the detective.<>
---------------
You see, the Dark Ages tried to make a science aboutgood people.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Well, they say we should make hay while the sun shines," said Devine.<>
---------------
"Perhaps you make honey while the moon shines.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Perhaps there is a good deal of moonshine in the business," he said:"but I warn you my bees do not only make honey.<>
---------------
Well, it took me a little time to make out the memorandum, whichwas in cipher, and Father Brown's telephone message from the House cameas I was near the end.<>
---------------
He was one of those great penitents who manage to make more outof penitence than others can make out of virtue.<>
---------------
Sometimes he seemed to haveforgotten the matter in hand altogether, for he would make passingremarks on historical and social questions, or on the prospects ofdevelopment in the district.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "I had better make sure, don't you think?" asked Father Brownapologetically, and scuttled softly downstairs again.<>
---------------
I braved the colonel's curry-seasoned temper toverify the fact that the front pavement was washed yesterday and not to-day; it was wet enough to make wet footprints all along the road.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) And he lifted the bar out of its socket and let it fall with a clang atthe side of the door,"It does make a noise if you unbar the door," said Father Brown gravely,"even if you do it pretty carefully.<>
---------------
But even I can't make anything ofwhat I know, except a mystery.<>
---------------
Peter will make thatthe only test at the gate of heaven.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "But what is the use of all this tirade?" asked the actor, who hadhardly ever heard his clerical friend, make so long a speech before.<>
---------------
I feel rather as if I were going to make a confession.<>
---------------
"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Evan Smith turned with a rather desperate appearance of carelessness andapproached the girl; but she was not the sort of person whom it is hardto make busy with small jobs for others.<>
---------------
You steppedoutside for a moment, as shopmen often do, to make sure of what hemeant; and in that moment of time he perceived in the inner room therazor you had just laid down, and the yellow-white head of Sir Arthurin the barber's chair; probably both glimmering in the light of thatlittle window beyond.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "What a horrible tale of hatred! What a vengeance for one mortal worm totake on another! Shall we ever get to the bottom of this bottomlesshuman heart, where such abominable imaginations can abide? God save usall from pride; but I cannot yet make any picture in my mind of hate andvengeance like that.<>
---------------
" He controlled the shudderin his voice, and went on:"Remembering that story of a fantastic and yet patient plot to make thevengeance fit the crime, consider the other story before us.<>
---------------
Sometimes they make up suits of armour out ofdifferent bits; but that suit all covered one man, and covered him verycompletely.<>
---------------
I would not suggest that it is in the least likely thatyour son would do anything to make you doubt his fitness for the charge.<>
---------------
Nothing will make me believethat a man who arranged all the rest of that room with that exaggeratedsymmetry left that one feature of it lopsided.<>
---------------
But, I confess, I can't quite make head or tail of the wayin which he is talking about it.<>
---------------
Hark! Do you hear the cry with whichhe lifts his head and sees in that socket of stone, that has been hollowfor ages, the one red and angry moon that is the eye of the mountain?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Do you really mean," cried Lord Mounteagle, a little shaken, "that youcould make it pass from here to Mount Meru? I used to believe you hadgreat spiritual powers, but----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "Perhaps," said the Master, "I have more than you will ever believe.<>
---------------
He liked us to think that he hadmarvellous mental powers that could make a material object fly throughspace; and even when he hadn't done it, he allowed us to think he had.<>
---------------
The question wouldn't present itself in the form: 'Shall I steal thispebble?' but only in the form: 'Could I make a pebble vanish and re-appear on a distant mountain?' The question of whose pebble would strikehim as irrelevant.<>
---------------
Unfortunately, some people are likely to make it public.<>
---------------
(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) "General," said Father Brown, "suppose Cockspur or his sort were goingto make the world ring with tales against your country and your flag.<>
---------------
I thought he did not need any monkish vampires to make himmiserable.<>
---------------
" Then headded, after reflection: "I don't know whether you would make a reallygood criminal.<>
---------------
But you ought to make a rattling good novelist.<>
---------------
But was there not something wrong with the man whotalked in that calm way about being a murderer? Was it possible that thepriest was a little mad?"Don't you think," he said, abruptly; "that this notion of yours, of aman trying to feel like a criminal, might make him a little too tolerantof crime?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown ) Father Brown sat up and spoke in a more staccato style.<>
---------------
anybody can make a mistake
= può capitare a tutti di fare un errore ,
---------------
anyone can make a mistake
= può capitare a tutti di fare un errore ,
---------------
as you make your bed so you must lie on it
= chi è causa del suo male , pianga se stesso , hai voluto la bicicletta e ora pedala ,
---------------
at make
= nel punto in cui si chiude il circuito , nel punto in cui avviene il contatto ,
---------------
can you make sense of this article
= ci capisci qualcosa in questo articolo? ,
---------------
did you make out the drift of the conversation
= hai colto il senso del discorso? ,
---------------
don't let the children make such a noise
= non lasciare che i bambini facciano tanto chiasso! ,
---------------
don't make as if you had no time
= non fingere di non avere tempo ,
---------------
don't make so much disturbance
= non metterti in agitazione ,
---------------
don't make so much disturbance about
= non metterti in agitazione per ,
---------------
don't make so much disturbance about a little thing
= non metterti in agitazione per un nonnulla ,
---------------
don't make such a loud noise
= non fare tanto chiasso! ,
---------------
don't make such a noise
= non fare tanto chiasso! ,
---------------
don't make yourself cheap
= non comportarti in modo indegno! ,
---------------
film stock make
= marca della pellicola ,
---------------
he'll make old bones
= camperà cent'anni,
---------------
i make no apology for reminding
= mi permetto di ricordare,
---------------
i make no apology for reminding you
= mi permetto di ricordarti, mi permetto di ricordarvi,
---------------
i'll tell you something that will make you blink
= ti dirò una cosa che ti farà restare a bocca aperta,
---------------
it's not beyond him to make the dinner
= è ancora in grado di preparare la cena! ,
---------------
md
= make directory, mini disk , monochrome display, md,
---------------
mkdir
= make directory, mkdir,
---------------
move your arse and make space for me too
= sposta il culo e fammi posto!,
---------------
on the make
= intento a far quattrini, intento a far carriera, indaffarato, impegnato a farsi una donna,
---------------
shift your arse and make space for me too
= sposta il culo e fammi posto! ,
---------------
the cowl does make the monk
= l'abito non fa il monaco ,
---------------
they could be dead for all the difference it would make
= potrebbero anche essere morti , per quello che importa! ,
---------------
unable to make head or tail of it
= incapace di capirci qualcosa ,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - abbonare
Ausiliare:essere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io mi abbono
tu ti abboni
egli si abbona
noi ci abboniamo
voi vi abbonate
essi si abbonano
Imperfetto
io mi abbonavo
tu ti abbonavi
egli si abbonava
noi ci abbonavamo
voi vi abbonavate
essi si abbonavano
Passato remoto
io mi abbonai
tu ti abbonasti
egli si abbonò
noi ci abbonammo
voi vi abbonaste
essi si abbonarono
Passato prossimo
io mi sono abbonato
tu ti sei abbonato
egli si é abbonato
noi ci siamo abbonati
voi vi siete abbonati
essi si sono abbonati
Trapassato prossimo
io mi ero abbonato
tu ti eri abbonato
egli era abbonato
noi ci eravamo abbonati
voi vi eravate abbonati
essi si erano abbonati
Trapassato remoto
io mi fui abbonato
tu ti fosti abbonato
egli si fu abbonato
noi ci fummo abbonati
voi vi foste abbonati
essi si furono abbonati
Futuro semplice
io mi abbonerò
tu ti abbonerai
egli si abbonerà
noi ci abboneremo
voi vi abbonerete
essi si abboneranno
Futuro anteriore
io mi sarò abbonato
tu ti sarai abbonato
egli si sarà abbonato
noi ci saremo abbonati
voi vi sarete abbonati
essi si saranno abbonati
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io mi abboni
che tu ti abboni
che egli si abboni
che noi ci abboniamo
che voi vi abboniate
che essi si abbonino
Passato
che io mi sia abbonato
che tu ti sia abbonato
che egli si sia abbonato
che noi ci siamo abbonati
che voi vi siate abbonati
che essi si siano abbonati
Imperfetto
che io mi abbonassi
che tu ti abbonassi
che egli si abbonasse
che noi ci abbonassimo
che voi vi abbonaste
che essi si abbonassero
Trapassato
che io mi fossi abbonato
che tu ti fossi abbonato
che egli si fosse abbonato
che noi ci fossimo abbonati
che voi vi foste abbonati
che essi si fossero abbonati
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io mi abbonerei
tu ti abboneresti
egli si abbonerebbe
noi ci abboneremmo
voi vi abbonereste
essi si abbonerebbero
Passato
io mi sarei abbonato
tu ti saresti abbonato
egli si sarebbe abbonato
noi ci saremmo abbonati
voi vi sareste abbonati
essi si sarebbero abbonati
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
abbonati
si abboni
abboniamoci
abbonatevi
si abbonino
Futuro
-
ti abbonerai
si abbonerà
ci abboneremo
vi abbonerete
si abboneranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
abbonar
Passato
essersi abbonato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
abbonante
Passato
abbonatosi
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
abbonando
Passato
essendo abbonato
Verb: to make-made-made
Ausiliar: to have - transitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I make a...
you make a...
he/she/it makes a...
we make a...
you make a...
they make a...
Simple past
I made a...
you made a...
he/she/it made a...
we made a...
you made a...
they made a...
Simple past
I made a...
you made a...
he/she/it made a...
we made a...
you made a...
they made a...
Present perfect
I have made a...
you have made a...
he/she/it has made a...
we have made a...
you have made a...
they have made a...
Past perfect
I had made a...
you had made a...
he/she/it had made a...
we had made a...
you had made a...
they had made a...
Past perfect
I had made a...
you had made a...
he/she/it had made a...
we had made a...
you had made a...
they had made a...
Simple future
I will make a...
you will make a...
he/she/it will make a...
we will make a...
you will make a...
they will make a...
Future perfect
I will have made a...
you will have made a...
he/she/it will have made a...
we will have made a...
you will have made a...
they will have made a...
Present continuous
I am making a...
you are making a...
he/she/it is making a...
we are making a...
you are making a...
they are making a...
Past simple continuous
I was making a...
you were making a...
he/she/it was making a...
we were making a...
you were making a...
they were making a...
Future continuous
I will be making a...
you will be making a...
he/she/it will be making a...
we will be making a...
you will be making a...
they will be making a...
Future perfect continuous
I will have been making a...
you will have been making a...
he/she/it will have been making a...
we will have been making a...
you will have been making a...
they will have been making a...
Present perfect continuous
I have been making a...
you have been making a...
he/she/it has been making a...
we have been making a...
you have been making a...
they have been making a...
Past perfect continuous
I had been making a...
you had been making a...
he/she/it had been making a...
we had been making a...
you had been making a...
they had been making a...
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I make a...
That you make a...
That he/she/it make a...
That we make a...
That you make a...
That they make a...
Present perfect
That I have made a...
That you have made a...
That he/she/it have made a...
That we have made a...
That you have made a...
That they have made a...
Simple past
That I made a...
That you made a...
That he/she/it made a...
That we made a...
That you made a...
That they made a...
Past perfect
That I had made a...
That you had made a...
That he/she/it had made a...
That we had made a...
That you had made a...
That they had made a...
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would make a...
you would make a...
we would make a...
we would make a...
you would make a...
they would make a...
Past
I would have made
you would have made
he/she/it would have made
we would have made
you would have made
they would have made
Present continous
I would be making a...
you would be making a...
we would be making a...
we would be making a...
you would be making a...
they would be making a...
Past continous
I would have been making
you would have been making
he/she/it would have been making
we would have been making
you would have been making
they would have been making
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
let me make a...
make a...
let him make a...
let us make a...
make a...
let them make a...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to make
Past
to have made
Present continous
to be making
Perfect continous
to have been making
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
making
Past
made
Perfect
having made
Affermative - GERUND
Present
making
Past
having made
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do not make a...
you do not make a...
he/she/it does not makes a...
we do not make a...
you do not make a...
they do not make a...
Simple past
I did not make a...
you did not make a...
he/she/it did not make a...
we did not make a...
you did not make a...
they did not make a...
Simple past
I did not make a...
you did not make a...
he/she/it did not make a...
we did not make a...
you did not make a...
they did not make a...
Present perfect
I have not made a...
you have not made a...
he/she/it has not made a...
we have not made a...
you have not made a...
they have not made a...
Past perfect
I had not made a...
you had not made a...
he/she/it had not made a...
we had not made a...
you had not made a...
they had not made a...
Past perfect
I had not made a...
you had not made a...
he/she/it had not made a...
we had not made a...
you had not made a...
they had not made a...
Simple future
I will not make a...
you will not make a...
he/she/it will not make a...
we will not make a...
you will not make a...
they will not make a...
Future perfect
I will not have made a...
you will not have made a...
he/she/it will not have made a...
we will not have made a...
you will not have made a...
they will not have made a...
Present continuous
I am not making a...
you are not making a...
he/she/it is not making a...
we are not making a...
you are not making a...
they are not making a...
Past simple continuous
I was not making a...
you were not making a...
he/she/it was not making a...
we were not making a...
you were not making a...
they were not making a...
Future continuous
I will not be making a...
you will not be making a...
he/she/it will not be making a...
we will not be making a...
you will not be making a...
they will not be making a...
Future perfect continuous
I will not have been making a...
you will not have been making a...
he/she/it will not have been making a...
we will not have been making a...
you will not have been making a...
they will not have been making a...
Present perfect continuous
I have not been making a...
you have not been making a...
he/she/it has not been making a...
we have not been making a...
you have not been making a...
they have not been making a...
Past perfect continuous
I had not been making a...
you had not been making a...
he/she/it had not been making a...
we had not been making a...
you had not been making a...
they had not been making a...
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do not make a...
That you do not make a...
That he/she/it does not make a...
That we do not make a...
That you do not make a...
That they do not make a...
Present perfect
That I have not made a...
That you have not made a...
That he/she/it have not made a...
That we have not made a...
That you have not made a...
That they have not made a...
Simple past
That I did not make a...
That you did not make a...
That he/she/it did not make a...
That we did not make a...
That you did not make a...
That they did not make a...
Past perfect
That I had not made a...
That you had not made a...
That he/she/it had not made a...
That we had not made a...
That you had not made a...
That they had not made a...
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not make a...
you would not make a...
we would not make a...
we would not make a...
you would not make a...
they would not make a...
Past
I would not have made
you would not have made
he/she/it would not have made
we would not have made
you would not have made
they would not have made
Present continous
I would not be making a...
you would not be making a...
we would not be making a...
we would not be making a...
you would not be making a...
they would not be making a...
Past continous
I would not have been making
you would not have been making
he/she/it would not have been making
we would not have been making
you would not have been making
they would not have been making
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
do not let me make a...
do not make a...
do not let him make a...
do not let us make a...
do not make a...
do not let them make a...
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to make
Past
not to have made
Present continous
not to be making
Perfect continous
not to have been making
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not making
Past
not made
Perfect
not having made
Negative - GERUND
Present
not making
Past
not having made
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I make a...?
do you make a...?
does she/he/it makes a...?
do we make a...?
do you make a...?
do they make a...?
Simple past
did I make a...?
did you make a...?
did she/he/it make a...?
did we make a...?
did you make a...?
did they make a...?
Simple past
did I make a...?
did you make a...?
did she/he/it make a...?
did we make a...?
did you make a...?
did they make a...?
Present perfect
have I made a...?
have you made a...?
has she/he/it made a...?
have we made a...?
have you made a...?
have they made a...?
Past perfect
had I made a...?
had you made a...?
had she/he/it made a...?
had we made a...?
had you made a...?
had they made a...?
Past perfect
had I made a...?
had you made a...?
had she/he/it made a...?
had we made a...?
had you made a...?
had they made a...?
Simple future
will I make a...?
will you make a...?
will she/he/it make a...?
will we make a...?
will you make a...?
will they make a...?
Future perfect
will I have made a...?
will you have made a...?
will she/he/it have made a...?
will we have made a...?
will you have made a...?
will they have made a...?
Present continuous
am I making a...?
are you making a...?
is she/he/it making a...?
are we making a...?
are you making a...?
are they making a...?
Past simple continuous
was I making a...?
were you making a...?
was she/he/it making a...?
were we making a...?
were you making a...?
were they making a...?
Future continuous
will I be making a...?
will you be making a...?
will she/he/it be making a...?
will we be making a...?
will you be making a...?
will they be making a...?
Future perfect continuous
will I have been making a...?
will you have been making a...?
will she/he/it have been making a...?
will we have been making a...?
will you have been making a...?
will they have been making a...?
Present perfect continuous
have I been making a...?
have you been making a...?
has she/he/it been making a...?
have we been making a...?
have you been making a...?
have they been making a...?
Past perfect continuous
had I been making a...?
had you been making a...?
had she/he/it been making a...?
had we been making a...?
had you been making a...?
had they been making a...?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I make a...?
That do you make a...?
That does she/he/it make a...?
That do we make a...?
That do you make a...?
That do they make a...?
Present perfect
That have I made a...?
That have you made a...?
That have she/he/it made a...?
That have we made a...?
That have you made a...?
That have they made a...?
Simple past
That did I make a...?
That did you make a...?
That did she/he/it make a...?
That did we make a...?
That did you make a...?
That did they make a...?
Past perfect
That had I made a...?
That had you made a...?
That had she/he/it made a...?
That had we made a...?
That had you made a...?
That had they made a...?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I make a...?
would you make a...?
would she/he/it make a...?
would we make a...?
would you make a...?
would they make a...?
Past
would I have made?
would you have made?
would she/he/it have made?
would we have made?
would you have made?
would they have made?
Present continous
would I be making a...?
would you be making a...?
would she/he/it be making a...?
would we be making a...?
would you be making a...?
would they be making a...?
Past continous
would I have been making?
would you have been making?
would she/he/it have been making?
would we have been making?
would you have been making?
would they have been making?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not make a...?
do you not make a...?
does she/he/it not makes a...?
do we not make a...?
do you not make a...?
do they not make a...?
Simple past
did I not make a...?
did you not make a...?
did she/he/it not make a...?
did we not make a...?
did you not make a...?
did they not make a...?
Simple past
did I not make a...?
did you not make a...?
did she/he/it not make a...?
did we not make a...?
did you not make a...?
did they not make a...?
Present perfect
have I not made a...?
have you not made a...?
has she/he/it not made a...?
have we not made a...?
have you not made a...?
have they not made a...?
Past perfect
had I not made a...?
had you not made a...?
had she/he/it not made a...?
had we not made a...?
had you not made a...?
had they not made a...?
Past perfect
had I not made a...?
had you not made a...?
had she/he/it not made a...?
had we not made a...?
had you not made a...?
had they not made a...?
Simple future
will I not make a...?
will you not make a...?
will she/he/it not make a...?
will we not make a...?
will you not make a...?
will they not make a...?
Future perfect
will I not have made a...?
will you not have made a...?
will she/he/it not have made a...?
will we not have made a...?
will you not have made a...?
will they not have made a...?
Present continuous
am I not making a...?
are you not making a...?
is she/he/it not making a...?
are we not making a...?
are you not making a...?
are they not making a...?
Past simple continuous
was I not making a...?
were you not making a...?
was she/he/it not making a...?
were we not making a...?
were you not making a...?
were they not making a...?
Future continuous
will I not be making a...?
will you not be making a...?
will she/he/it not be making a...?
will we not be making a...?
will you not be making a...?
will they not be making a...?
Future perfect continuous
will I not have been making a...?
will you not have been making a...?
will she/he/it not have been making a...?
will we not have been making a...?
will you not have been making a...?
will they not have been making a...?
Present perfect continuous
have I not been making a...?
have you not been making a...?
has she/he/it not been making a...?
have we not been making a...?
have you not been making a...?
have they not been making a...?
Past perfect continuous
had I not been making a...?
had you not been making a...?
had she/he/it not been making a...?
had we not been making a...?
had you not been making a...?
had they not been making a...?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not make a...?
That do you not make a...?
That does she/he/it not make a...?
That do we not make a...?
That do you not make a...?
That do they not make a...?
Present perfect
That have I not made a...?
That have you not made a...?
That have she/he/it not made a...?
That have we not made a...?
That have you not made a...?
That have they not made a...?
Simple past
That did I not make a...?
That did you not make a...?
That did she/he/it not make a...?
That did we not make a...?
That did you not make a...?
That did they not make a...?
Past perfect
That had I not made a...?
That had you not made a...?
That had she/he/it not made a...?
That had we not made a...?
That had you not made a...?
That had they not made a...?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not make a...?
would you not make a...?
would she/he/it not make a...?
would we not make a...?
would you not make a...?
would they not make a...?
Past
would I not have made?
would you not have made?
would she/he/it not have made?
would we not have made?
would you not have made?
would they not have made?
Present continous
would I not be making a...?
would you not be making a...?
would she/he/it not be making a...?
would we not be making a...?
would you not be making a...?
would they not be making a...?
Past continous
would I not have been making?
would you not have been making?
would she/he/it not have been making?
would we not have been making?
would you not have been making?
would they not have been making?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present