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Verbi e vocaboli Spagnolo
Italiano
Inglese

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sinonimi di
ideate
  Cerca  frasi:
Vocabolario e frasi
ideare
= verbo transitivo , concepire nella mente , determinare col pensiero
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architettare
= verbo trans. ideare il progetto di un edificio concepire , ordire , macchinare
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ideabile
= che si può ideare , pensabile .
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progettare
= verbo trans . pensare , ideare qualcosa e studiare il modo di realizzarla
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Vocabolario e frasi
think
= pensare , credere , stimare , sembrare , capire , inventare , pensiero , idea ,
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"In such cases, a woman has not often much beauty to think of.
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"But consider your daughters. Only think what an establishment it would
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hearty consent to his marrying whichever he chooses of the girls; though
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had always intended to visit him, though to the last always assuring
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she will think it an act of kindness, if you decline the office, I will
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Bennet perhaps surpassing the rest; though, when the first tumult of joy
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for your sakes, we would do anything. Lydia, my love, though you are
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"Oh!" said Lydia stoutly, "I am not afraid; for though I am the
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her mother could be, though in a quieter way. Elizabeth felt Jane's
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she looked; and Mr. Bingley thought her quite beautiful, and danced with
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her twice! Only think of that, my dear; he actually danced with her
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entitled to think well of themselves, and meanly of others. They were of
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easiness, openness, and ductility of his temper, though no disposition
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could offer a greater contrast to his own, and though with his own he
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reserved, and fastidious, and his manners, though well-bred, were not
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commendation to think of her as he chose.
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where he could think with pleasure of his own importance, and,
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the world. For, though elated by his rank, it did not render him
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assemblies, and whether he did not think there were a great many
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pretty women in the room, and which he thought the prettiest? and his
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should think highly of himself. If I may so express it, he has a right
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things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may
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ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.
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the goodwill of Mrs. Hurst and Miss Bingley; and though the mother was
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* "Perhaps he must, if he sees enough of her. But, though Bingley and Jane
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if she were married to him to-morrow, I should think she had as good a
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this discovery succeeded some others equally mortifying. Though he had
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himself agreeable nowhere, and who had not thought her handsome enough
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* On his approaching them soon afterwards, though without seeming to have
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* Her performance was pleasing, though by no means capital. After a song
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* Mary had neither genius nor taste; and though vanity had given her
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much more pleasure, though not playing half so well; and Mary, at the
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much engrossed by his thoughts to perceive that Sir William Lucas was
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* "Do you not think it would be a proper compliment to the place?"
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* "I had once had some thought of fixing in town myself--for I am fond
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And, taking her hand, he would have given it to Mr. Darcy who, though
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me the happiness of seeing you; and though this gentleman dislikes the
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fortune, though ample for her situation in life, could but ill supply
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ready to think your own children silly. If I wished to think slightingly
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so far differ from you as to think our two youngest daughters uncommonly
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not think about officers any more than we do. I remember the time when
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should want one of my girls I shall not say nay to him; and I thought
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* Elizabeth, feeling really anxious, was determined to go to her, though
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* "How can you be so silly," cried her mother, "as to think of such a
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Bennet had slept ill, and though up, was very feverish, and not
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being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their
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she had no conversation, no style, no beauty. Mrs. Hurst thought the
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all lost upon me. I thought Miss Elizabeth Bennet looked remarkably
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inclined to think that you would not wish to see your sister make such
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* "I think I have heard you say that their uncle is an attorney in
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credit; but I am an idle fellow, and though I have not many, I have more
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* "Upon my word, Caroline, I should think it more possible to get
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"I think she will. She is now about Miss Elizabeth Bennet's height, or
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moved. Mr. Jones says we must not think of moving her. We must trespass
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* "Removed!" cried Bingley. "It must not be thought of. My sister, I am
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a vast deal, though with the greatest patience in the world, which is
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country that is equal to Netherfield. You will not think of quitting it
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in a hurry, I hope, though you have but a short lease.
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gentleman," looking at Darcy, "seemed to think the country was nothing
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saying something that might turn her mother's thoughts, now asked her if
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did not. Perhaps he thought her too young. However, he wrote some verses
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speak, but could think of nothing to say; and after a short silence Mrs.
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continued, though slowly, to mend; and in the evening Elizabeth joined
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year! Letters of business, too! How odious I should think them!"
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little design for a table, and I think it infinitely superior to Miss
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intend; for he would certainly think better of me, if under such a
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very great moment, should you think ill of that person for complying
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* Mr. Darcy smiled; but Elizabeth thought she could perceive that he was
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ten words to her through the whole of Saturday, and though they were
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wondered at their coming, and thought them very wrong to give so much
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father, though very laconic in his expressions of pleasure, was really
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I answered it, for I thought it a case of some delicacy, and requiring
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Pray do not talk of that odious man. I do think it is the hardest thing
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* "No, that I am sure I shall not; and I think it is very impertinent of
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"No, my dear, I think not. I have great hopes of finding him quite the
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were withdrawn, he thought it time to have some conversation with his
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* "I think you said she was a widow, sir? Has she any family?"
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"They arise chiefly from what is passing at the time, and though I
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of a serious stamp, though written solely for their benefit. It amazes
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miserly father; and though he belonged to one of the universities, he
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estate; and he thought it an excellent one, full of eligibility and
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always sure of leisure and tranquillity; and though prepared, as he told
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between the two gentlemen; but though Jane would have defended either
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conversation, though it was only on its being a wet night, made her feel
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him, though what she chiefly wished to hear she could not hope to be
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spent four days in the same house with him, and I think him very
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and thought he had done it; but when the living fell, it was given
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* Elizabeth honoured him for such feelings, and thought him handsomer than
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* "I had not thought Mr. Darcy so bad as this--though I have never liked
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him. I had not thought so very ill of him. I had supposed him to be
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* Elizabeth was again deep in thought, and after a time exclaimed, "To
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connected together, as I think you said, in the closest manner!"
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* This information made Elizabeth smile, as she thought of poor Miss
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done, but to think well of them both, to defend the conduct of each,
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business? Do clear them too, or we shall be obliged to think ill of
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* But Jane could think with certainty on only one point--that Mr. Bingley,
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Elizabeth thought with pleasure of dancing a great deal with Mr.
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less on any single event, or any particular person, for though they
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* Elizabeth's spirits were so high on this occasion, that though she did
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he did, whether he would think it proper to join in the evening's
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compliment on her wit and vivacity; and though more astonished than
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pleasure in the Bingleys' invitation to the officers; and though
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* This part of his intelligence, though unheard by Lydia, was caught by
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* But Elizabeth was not formed for ill-humour; and though every prospect
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features, but he said not a word, and Elizabeth, though blaming herself
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* "I do not think we were speaking at all. Sir William could not have
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* "What think you of books?" said he, smiling.
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* "I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be
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silence; and on each side dissatisfied, though not to an equal degree,
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always been remarkably kind to him, though George Wickham has treated
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cannot bear to hear George Wickham mentioned, and that though my brother
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been too pleasantly engaged to think of any third person; in which case
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"He does not exactly recollect the circumstances, though he has heard
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the rest from that friend himself, I shall venture to still think of
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delight to the happy, though modest hopes which Jane entertained of Mr.
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guide, though in the case before us I consider myself more fitted by
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his speech with a solemn bow and though she could not hear a word of
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handsome thought. Upon the whole, I am much pleased with him.
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endeavouring even to like Bingley's two sisters. Her mother's thoughts
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then it was such a comfort to think how fond the two sisters were of
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fortunate, though evidently and triumphantly believing there was no
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glancing her eye at Mr. Darcy, though every glance convinced her of what
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she dreaded; for though he was not always looking at her mother, she was
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* Mary, though pretending not to hear, was somewhat disconcerted; and
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as comfortable as possible. And I do not think it of light importance
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him of that duty; nor could I think well of the man who should omit an
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finer success; and happy did she think it for Bingley and her sister
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Mr. Collins, who continued most perseveringly by her side, and though
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months. Of having another daughter married to Mr. Collins, she thought
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with equal certainty, and with considerable, though not equal, pleasure.
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Elizabeth was the least dear to her of all her children; and though the
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"My reasons for marrying are, first, that I think it a right thing for
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* "Were it certain that Lady Catherine would think so," said Mr. Collins
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me; though I am far from accusing you of cruelty at present, because I
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sometimes with playful gaiety, replied to her attacks. Though her manner
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He thought too well of himself to comprehend on what motives his cousin
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could refuse him; and though his pride was hurt, he suffered in no other
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fun here! What do you think has happened this morning? Mr. Collins has
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and though the suddenness of their removal surprised her, she saw
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* "Why will you think so? It must be his own doing. He is his own
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"What do you think of this sentence, my dear Lizzy?" said Jane as she
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* "If we thought alike of Miss Bingley," replied Jane, "your
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* "I did not think you would; and that being the case, I cannot consider
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conclusion of all was the comfortable declaration, that though he had
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till its success might be known likewise; for though feeling almost
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was to make him the happiest of men; and though such a solicitation must
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and probably would blame her; and though her resolution was not to be
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again, which I should think exceedingly probable, stay quietly at home,
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regard during my stay in Hertfordshire. As for my fair cousins, though
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understand by it that he thought of paying his addresses to one of her
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a solidity in his reflections which often struck her, and though by no
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means so clever as herself, she thought that if encouraged to read
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reproach; though, as it was no more than she expected, she soon regained
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"Why should you be surprised, my dear Eliza? Do you think it incredible
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you. But when you have had time to think it over, I hope you will be
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him through it all; and though he begged leave to be positive as to the
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been used to think tolerably sensible, was as foolish as his wife, and
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did not come back she would think herself very ill used. It needed
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* "Indeed, Mr. Bennet," said she, "it is very hard to think that Charlotte
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"My dear, do not give way to such gloomy thoughts. Let us hope for
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* "I cannot bear to think that they should have all this estate. If it was
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could not think without anger, hardly without contempt, on that easiness
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whatever manner he thought best, but her sister's was involved in it, as
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she thought he must be sensible himself. It was a subject, in short,
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could think of nothing else; and yet whether Bingley's regard had really
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observation; whatever were the case, though her opinion of him must be
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* "Nay," said Elizabeth, "this is not fair. You wish to think all the
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to think you perfect, and you set yourself against it. Do not
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whom I really love, and still fewer of whom I think well. The more I see
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Charlotte had any regard for him, I should only think worse of her
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cannot have a proper way of thinking. You shall not defend her, though
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* "I must think your language too strong in speaking of both," replied
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unhappy, there may be error, and there may be misery. Thoughtlessness,
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I think of persons you esteem. Stop me whilst you can.
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more, and though a day seldom passed in which Elizabeth did not account
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no more; but though the probability of the statement was admitted at
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It is something to think of, and it gives her a sort of distinction
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* "True," said Mr. Bennet, "but it is a comfort to think that whatever of
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so in my own family, and to have neighbours who think of themselves
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independent fortune to think no more of a girl whom he was violently in
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would have laughed yourself out of it sooner. But do you think she
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a part of London! My dear aunt, how could you think of it? Mr. Darcy may
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would hardly think a month's ablution enough to cleanse him from its
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hopeless. It was possible, and sometimes she thought it probable, that
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Bingleys were no otherwise in her thoughts at the same time, than as she
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acquaintances in common; and though Wickham had been little there since
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honestly telling her what she thought, she thus went on:
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ought to have, I should think you could not do better. But as it is, you
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honour, I will try to do what I think to be the wisest; and now I hope
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* Elizabeth could not refuse, though she foresaw little pleasure in the
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and though determined not to slacken as a correspondent, it was for the
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be; though, when the letters were read, Elizabeth felt that Charlotte
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"I did not think Caroline in spirits," were her words, "but she was very
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though the event has proved you right, do not think me obstinate if I
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cause of it. I need not explain myself farther; and though we know
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in all this. But I will endeavour to banish every painful thought,
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and think only of what will make me happy--your affection, and the
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watchfulness has been effectual; and though I certainly should be a more
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Elizabeth to Hunsford. She had not at first thought very seriously of
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her minute inquiries, that though Jane always struggled to support her
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should be sorry to think our friend mercenary.
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to think ill of a young man who has lived so long in Derbyshire.
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creature. Who would have thought that she could be so thin and small?"
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for anything more. Lady Catherine will not think the worse of you
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Elizabeth saw much to be pleased with, though she could not be in such
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miraculous virtue, and the mere stateliness of money or rank she thought
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apologies and thanks which he would have thought necessary.
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features, though not plain, were insignificant; and she spoke very
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she was indisposed. Maria thought speaking out of the question, and the
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occasion for entailing estates from the female line. It was not thought
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much in company. But really, ma'am, I think it would be very hard upon
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at the first. And to be kept back on such a motive! I think it would
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for every fish he won, and apologising if he thought he won too many.
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commendation, though costing her some trouble, could by no means satisfy
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which he never failed coming to inform them of, though it happened
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not many in which his wife did not think it necessary to go likewise;
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* Elizabeth soon perceived, that though this great lady was not in
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expected there in the course of a few weeks, and though there were not
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the Bingleys and Jane, and she thought he looked a little confused as he
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will never play really well unless she practises more; and though Mrs.
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me? I will not be alarmed though your sister does play so well. There
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was at a ball--and at this ball, what do you think he did? He danced
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only four dances, though gentlemen were scarce; and, to my certain
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of fingering, though her taste is not equal to Anne's. Anne would have
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visitor. As she had heard no carriage, she thought it not unlikely to
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necessary, therefore, to think of something, and in this emergence
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"I think I have understood that Mr. Bingley has not much idea of ever
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former favourite George Wickham; and though, in comparing them, she saw
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Collins did not think it right to press the subject, from the danger of
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but he actually thought it necessary to turn back and walk with her. He
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Fitzwilliam in his thoughts? She supposed, if he meant anything, he must
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* "Unless where they like women of fortune, which I think they very often
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* "Is this," thought Elizabeth, "meant for me?" and she coloured at the
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Miss Bingley. I think I have heard you say that you know them.
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our journey hither, I have reason to think Bingley very much indebted to
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was so thoughtful.
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as soon as their visitor left them, she could think without interruption
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could anything be urged against my father, who, though with some
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respectability which he will probably never reach." When she thought of
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to think that his visit to Rosings was to end on the day after the
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* She could not think of Darcy's leaving Kent without remembering that
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the compliment of such a man's affection, and though her intentions did
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"I have every reason in the world to think ill of you. No motive can
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Jane--his unpardonable assurance in acknowledging, though he could
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Elizabeth awoke the next morning to the same thoughts and meditations
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surprise of what had happened; it was impossible to think of anything
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her name. She had turned away; but on hearing herself called, though
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from the evening's scrutiny, that though she received his attentions
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there were other causes of repugnance; causes which, though still
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me. These causes must be stated, though briefly. The situation of your
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mother's family, though objectionable, was nothing in comparison to that
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was unknowingly done and though the motives which governed me may to
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many, many years since I first began to think of him in a very different
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he hoped I should not think it unreasonable for him to expect some more
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between us seemed now dissolved. I thought too ill of him to invite him
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gone through the whole letter, though scarcely knowing anything of the
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* In this perturbed state of mind, with thoughts that could rest on
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he had related himself; and the kindness of the late Mr. Darcy, though
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character, though he had assured her that respect for the father would
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could she think without feeling she had been blind, partial, prejudiced,
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* From herself to Jane--from Jane to Bingley, her thoughts were in a line
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description of Jane. She felt that Jane's feelings, though fervent, were
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variety of thought--re-considering events, determining probabilities,
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longer an object; she could think only of her letter.
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grievous then was the thought that, of a situation so desirable in every
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way, that Maria thought herself obliged, on her return, to undo all the
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humble home scene, I think we may flatter ourselves that your Hunsford
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not think anyone abiding in it an object of compassion, while they are
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had chosen it with her eyes open; and though evidently regretting that
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compliments to Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner, though unknown. He then handed her
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it is very pretty; but I thought I might as well buy it as not. I shall
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go too of all things! Only think what a miserable summer else we shall
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"Yes," thought Elizabeth, "that would be a delightful scheme indeed,
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"Aye, that is just like your formality and discretion. You thought the
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Elizabeth was shocked to think that, however incapable of such
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Collins; but I do not think there would have been any fun in it. Lord!
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was forced to come by herself; and then, what do you think we did? We
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lady, only think what fun! Not a soul knew of it, but Colonel and Mrs.
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Forster. I thought I should have died. And that made the men suspect
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had not been sick; and when we got to the George, I do think we behaved
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you too. And then when we came away it was such fun! I thought we never
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at the same time so vague and equivocal, that her mother, though often
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collected in one individual. Nor was Darcy's vindication, though
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* "I never thought Mr. Darcy so deficient in the appearance of it as you
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* "Oh well! it is just as he chooses. Nobody wants him to come. Though I
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Miller's regiment went away. I thought I should have broken my heart.
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* "Yes, very different. But I think Mr. Darcy improves upon acquaintance.
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banish from her thoughts that continual breach of conjugal obligation
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them threw a real gloom over their domestic circle; and, though Kitty
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was now the object of her happiest thoughts; it was her best consolation
---------------
* "But it is fortunate," thought she, "that I have something to wish for.
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less to be learnt--for her letters to Kitty, though rather longer, were
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the Lakes, and still thought there might have been time enough. But it
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* "And of this place," thought she, "I might have been mistress! With
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* "And do not you think him a very handsome gentleman, ma'am?"
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* "Except," thought Elizabeth, "when she goes to Ramsgate.
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very much to his credit, I am sure, that you should think so.
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replied the other. Elizabeth thought this was going pretty far; and she
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* Elizabeth almost stared at her. "Can this be Mr. Darcy?" thought she.
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lived; not like the wild young men nowadays, who think of nothing but
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* "In what an amiable light does this place him!" thought Elizabeth.
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eyes upon herself, she thought of his regard with a deeper sentiment of
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distraction of his thoughts.
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before Elizabeth was sensible of any of it; and, though she answered
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distinguished no part of the scene. Her thoughts were all fixed on that
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what manner he thought of her, and whether, in defiance of everything,
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who was not a great walker, could go no farther, and thought only
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progress was slow, for Mr. Gardiner, though seldom able to indulge the
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revolted in his offer to herself. "What will be his surprise," thought
---------------
* Elizabeth answered only by a slight bow. Her thoughts were instantly
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him think really ill of her.
---------------
* They now walked on in silence, each of them deep in thought. Elizabeth
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say with the housekeeper, that though some people may call him proud, I
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should not have thought that he could have behaved in so cruel a way by
---------------
to her husband all the interesting spots in its environs to think of
---------------
but think, and think with wonder, of Mr. Darcy's civility, and, above
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* Miss Darcy was tall, and on a larger scale than Elizabeth; and, though
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inquired in a friendly, though general way, after her family, and looked
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each with an earnest though guarded inquiry; and they soon drew from
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* In seeing Bingley, her thoughts naturally flew to her sister; and, oh!
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at Pemberley, before they left the country. Miss Darcy, though with a
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satisfaction, though while it was passing, the enjoyment of it had been
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* Of Mr. Darcy it was now a matter of anxiety to think well; and, as far
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there in much estimation; for though the chief of his concerns with the
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* As for Elizabeth, her thoughts were at Pemberley this evening more than
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the last; and the evening, though as it passed it seemed long, was not
---------------
valuable qualities, though at first unwillingly admitted, had for some
---------------
sort to be encouraged, as by no means unpleasing, though it could not be
---------------
late breakfast, ought to be imitated, though it could not be equalled,
---------------
morning. They were, therefore, to go. Elizabeth was pleased; though when
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all the embarrassment which, though proceeding from shyness and the fear
---------------
of saying much. Her own thoughts were employing her. She expected every
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party--for though they could not all talk, they could all eat; and the
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feelings which prevailed on his entering the room; and then, though but
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instantly comprehended that he was uppermost in her thoughts; and the
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Wickham, Georgiana also recovered in time, though not enough to be able
---------------
had been designed to turn his thoughts from Elizabeth seemed to have
---------------
seemed to improve on you, and I believe you thought her rather pretty at
---------------
himself; yet Elizabeth was longing to know what Mrs. Gardiner thought of
---------------
wish this may be more intelligible, but though not confined for time, my
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day before, not many hours after the express. Though Lydia's short
---------------
worst, but I cannot think so ill of him. Many circumstances might make
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that I am not afraid of requesting it, though I have still something
---------------
the servant, therefore, she commissioned him, though in so breathless
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* But self, though it would intrude, could not engross her. Lydia--the
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the voice of her companion, who, in a manner which, though it spoke
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stay, but real, though unavailing concern. Would to Heaven that anything
---------------
a hope of Wickham's meaning to marry her. No one but Jane, she thought,
---------------
as this she might have sufficient charms; and though she did not suppose
---------------
requiring constant attendance; and though almost persuaded that nothing
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of the last with trembling energy, though Lydia had never been a
---------------
assistance in his power. Elizabeth, though expecting no less, thanked
---------------
"Do you really think so?" cried Elizabeth, brightening up for a moment.
---------------
interest, for him to be guilty of. I cannot think so very ill of
---------------
* "Well, then--supposing them to be in London. They may be there, though
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might strike them that they could be more economically, though less
---------------
do as little, and think as little about it, as any father could do, in
---------------
* "But can you think that Lydia is so lost to everything but love of him
---------------
been taught to think on serious subjects; and for the last half-year,
---------------
* "But you see that Jane," said her aunt, "does not think so very ill of
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* "Of whom does Jane ever think ill? And who is there, whatever might be
---------------
their former conduct, that she would think capable of such an attempt,
---------------
case, neither Jane, to whom I related the whole, nor I, thought it
---------------
enough from my thoughts.
---------------
the whole of the journey. From Elizabeth's thoughts it was never absent.
---------------
"My mother is tolerably well, I trust; though her spirits are greatly
---------------
well looked after. I always thought they were very unfit to have the
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* But Mr. Gardiner, though he assured her again of his earnest endeavours
---------------
* Though her brother and sister were persuaded that there was no real
---------------
* "And did Colonel Forster appear to think well of Wickham himself? Does
---------------
I shall think you a simpleton, for there is but one man in the world I
---------------
* "Oh! thoughtless, thoughtless Lydia!" cried Elizabeth when she had
---------------
very difficult. My mother was in hysterics, and though I endeavoured to
---------------
fatigue, I am sure; but I did not think it right for either of them.
---------------
with a fare from London; and as he thought that the circumstance of a
---------------
days longer, as the former thought her presence might be serviceable
---------------
* Elizabeth, though she did not credit above
---------------
his power to satisfy us on this head. But, on second thoughts, perhaps,
---------------
and though she was not very sanguine in expecting it, the application
---------------
proceeded from a faulty degree of indulgence; though, at the same time,
---------------
fairly conjectured from that, though Elizabeth, who was by this time
---------------
Lydia's infamy somewhat better. It would have spared her, she thought,
---------------
as far as I thought myself privileged, for you. I shall send this by
---------------
"Wickham is not so undeserving, then, as we thought him," said her
---------------
less than ten thousand pounds. I should be sorry to think so ill of him,
---------------
Mr. Bennet made no answer, and each of them, deep in thought, continued
---------------
not marry Lydia if he had not a real regard for her. Though our kind
---------------
these transports, by leading her thoughts to the obligations which Mr.
---------------
not Jane, though with some difficulty, persuaded her to wait till her
---------------
refuge in her own room, that she might think with freedom.
---------------
no worse, she had need to be thankful. She felt it so; and though, in
---------------
dispatched; for, though dilatory in undertaking business, he was quick
---------------
accomplishment, and her thoughts and her words ran wholly on those
---------------
blow as this. She was humbled, she was grieved; she repented, though she
---------------
* What a triumph for him, as she often thought, could he know that the
---------------
temper, though unlike her own, would have answered all her wishes. It
---------------
his marriage was fixed on. And I think you will agree with me, in
---------------
prevailed on to think as they thought, and act as they wished. And their
---------------
been the culprit, and was wretched in the thought of what her sister
---------------
* "Only think of its being three months," she cried, "since I went away;
---------------
I had no more idea of being married till I came back again! though I
---------------
room, "and what do you think of my husband? Is not he a charming man? I
---------------
"No really," replied Elizabeth; "I think there cannot be too little said
---------------
* "Well, and so we breakfasted at ten as usual; I thought it would never
---------------
me, I did not once put my foot out of doors, though I was there a
---------------
* "Oh! certainly," said Elizabeth, though burning with curiosity; "we will
---------------
to think necessary; and then I must endeavour to be satisfied with
---------------
* "Not that I shall, though," she added to herself, as she finished
---------------
application; I did not expect it from you. Don't think me angry,
---------------
confessed that he had before thought it beneath him to lay his private
---------------
of disapprobation, though he did not say what. She then took a large
---------------
it only remained, he thought, to secure and expedite a marriage, which,
---------------
* "Mr. Darcy asked him why he had not married your sister at once. Though
---------------
Nothing was to be done that he did not do himself; though I am sure (and
---------------
in this; though I doubt whether his reserve, or anybody's reserve,
---------------
him. I thought him very sly;--he hardly ever mentioned your name. But
---------------
to be sure, done much. She was ashamed to think how much. But he had
---------------
pleasure, though mixed with regret, on finding how steadfastly both she
---------------
* "Undoubtedly. Did you see him while you were at Lambton? I thought I
---------------
"I have heard from authority, which I thought as good, that it was
---------------
* She held out her hand; he kissed it with affectionate gallantry, though
---------------
that I care about it, though. He is nothing to us, you know, and I am
---------------
other view than what was acknowledged; but she still thought him partial
---------------
* "Yet it is hard," she sometimes thought, "that this poor man cannot
---------------
husband's incivility; though it was very mortifying to know that her
---------------
her eyes, as she thought for that space of time that his affection and
---------------
she thought, more as he had been used to look in Hertfordshire, than as
---------------
the ground. More thoughtfulness and less anxiety to please, than when
---------------
regulars. Thank Heaven! he has some friends, though perhaps not so
---------------
as unaffected, though not quite so chatty. Jane was anxious that no
---------------
there that day; but, though she always kept a very good table, she did
---------------
not think anything less than two courses could be good enough for a man
---------------
* "My dear Lizzy, you cannot think me so weak, as to be in danger now?"
---------------
"I think you are in very great danger of making him as much in love with
---------------
admiration of her, which, though more guarded than formerly, persuaded
---------------
own, would be speedily secured. Though she dared not depend upon the
---------------
* The gentlemen came; and she thought he looked as if he would have
---------------
* She could think of nothing more to say; but if he wished to converse
---------------
say you to the day? I think every thing has passed off uncommonly well,
---------------
what do you think she said besides? 'Ah! Mrs. Bennet, we shall have her
---------------
at Netherfield at last.' She did indeed. I do think Mrs. Long is as good
---------------
instruct, though we can teach only what is not worth knowing. Forgive
---------------
* "I hope not so. Imprudence or thoughtlessness in money matters would be
---------------
he first came into Hertfordshire last year, I thought how likely it was
---------------
detested, had given him an invitation to dinner which he thought himself
---------------
learn to be contented, and we shall be on good terms again; though we
---------------
world, though only a few weeks before, when Lydia had first run away,
---------------
continued, though with little satisfaction, till the door was thrown
---------------
Bennet and Kitty, though she was perfectly unknown to them, even
---------------
name to her mother on her ladyship's entrance, though no request of
---------------
* Mrs. Bennet, all amazement, though flattered by having a guest of such
---------------
different walks. I think she will be pleased with the hermitage.
---------------
* "How could I ever think her like her nephew?" said she, as she looked in
---------------
afterwards united to my nephew, my own nephew, Mr. Darcy. Though I
---------------
know it must be a scandalous falsehood, though I would not injure him
---------------
you think I can be worked on by such persuasions as these. How far your
---------------
Meryton, thought she might as well call on you. I suppose she had
---------------
hours, learn to think of it less than incessantly. Lady Catherine, it
---------------
that he thought much higher of her ladyship than she could do; and it
---------------
as these; but I think I may defy even your sagacity, to discover the
---------------
"Mr. Darcy, you see, is the man! Now, Lizzy, I think I have
---------------
consent to what she termed so disgraceful a match. I thought it my duty
---------------
mistaken light, have given you uneasiness. I did not think Mrs. Gardiner
---------------
* "You must not blame my aunt. Lydia's thoughtlessness first betrayed to
---------------
family owe me nothing. Much as I respect them, I believe I thought
---------------
his situation, now forced herself to speak; and immediately, though not
---------------
but, though she could not look, she could listen, and he told her of
---------------
be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects. She
---------------
* "What did you say of me, that I did not deserve? For, though your
---------------
unpardonable. I cannot think of it without abhorrence.
---------------
* "I can easily believe it. You thought me then devoid of every proper
---------------
preservation of my regard; but, though we have both reason to think my
---------------
adieu is charity itself. But think no more of the letter. The feelings
---------------
of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you
---------------
being all my life, in practice, though not in principle. As a child I
---------------
by my parents, who, though good themselves (my father, particularly, all
---------------
circle; to think meanly of all the rest of the world; to wish at least
---------------
to think meanly of their sense and worth compared with my own. Such I
---------------
"Indeed I had. What will you think of my vanity? I believed you to be
---------------
* "I am almost afraid of asking what you thought of me, when we met at
---------------
before he quitted the inn, and that his gravity and thoughtfulness
---------------
* At night she opened her heart to Jane. Though suspicion was very far
---------------
"Oh, yes! You will only think I feel more than I ought to do, when I
---------------
having him. But let me advise you to think better of it. I know
---------------
comprehend what she heard; though not in general backward to credit
---------------
have thought it! And is it really true? Oh! my sweetest Lizzy! how rich
---------------
* "My dearest child," she cried, "I can think of nothing else! Ten
---------------
himself might be; and Elizabeth found that, though in the certain
---------------
is my favourite; but I think I shall like your husband quite as well
---------------
it; and really, all things considered, I begin to think it perfectly
---------------
affected; and though feeling no reliance on her, could not help writing
---------------
was a sincere pleasure to Elizabeth, though in the course of their
---------------
meetings she must sometimes think the pleasure dearly bought, when she
---------------
forbearance; and though Mrs. Phillips, as well as her sister, stood in
---------------
Nor was her respect for him, though it made her more quiet, at all
---------------
without mortification; and though the uncomfortable feelings arising
---------------
amiable, well-informed woman for the rest of her life; though perhaps it
---------------
society she was of course carefully kept, and though Mrs. Wickham
---------------
rich, and when you have nothing else to do, I hope you will think of us.
---------------
* Though Darcy could never receive him at Pemberley, yet, for
---------------
in the world of Elizabeth; though at first she often listened with
---------------
* 'Such,' thought Mr. Pickwick, 'are the narrow views
---------------
* 'Did he though?' inquired another cabman. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
listener, carried conviction with it. 'Ain't you, though--ain't you?'
---------------
* 'Present! think I was;* fired a musket--fired with an idea--rushed into
---------------
* Mr. Tupman said nothing; but he thought of Donna Christina, the stomach
---------------
* 'I was about to observe, Sir,' he said, 'that though my apparel would
---------------
bewildered with wine, negus, lights, and ladies, thought the whole
---------------
'It's been given out to brush,' thought Mr. Pickwick, 'and the man has
---------------
* Such were his thoughts when he returned to the coffee-room, and
---------------
'Fear of interruption!' thought Mr. Winkle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
up at the declining orb and painfully thought of the probability of his
---------------
* 'I think we may,' replied Mr. Snodgrass; who would have assented to
---------------
* 'I think we may adjourn,' said Lieutenant Tappleton. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I think we shall leave here the day after to-morrow,' was the reply. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
was connected with the theatre in this place, though he is not desirous
---------------
idea, and which, to this day, I shudder to think of. His voice was
---------------
'I sickened at the thought of the long course of cruelty and neglect
---------------
frightful alteration. The eyes, though deeply sunk and heavy, shone with
---------------
bestowing a scrutinising glance on the green-coated stranger. 'I think I
---------------
gave that person a very pressing invitation last night, which he thought
---------------
* 'I--I--really think they are,' urged Mr. Snodgrass, somewhat alarmed. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
pleasantly all the time, as if you thought it as good a joke as anybody
---------------
you very well, gentlemen, though you mayn't remember me. I spent some
---------------
* 'Do you think my dear nieces pretty?' whispered their affectionate aunt
---------------
little better, don't you think they would be nice-looking girls--by
---------------
'Yes; I think they would,' said Mr. Tupman, with an air of indifference. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
mean, that you don't think Isabella's stooping is as bad as Emily's
---------------
boldness. Well, she is bold! You cannot think how wretched it makes me
---------------
quite certain it would break his heart. I wish I could think it was only
---------------
* 'I have thought so, often,' said the dismal man, without noticing the
---------------
certainly thought--'
---------------
never thought of that.'
---------------
round him, 'that they think we have come by this horse in some dishonest
---------------
* 'Hollo, you fellow,' said the angry Mr. Pickwick,'do you think we stole
---------------
day's adventures as they thought proper to communicate, led the way to
---------------
* 'Well, I think it is,' said Mr. Wardle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'Ought I, though?' said the unfortunate, with a doubtful appeal to his
---------------
in reality were not quite so far off as some people thought for;
---------------
table made the good old man feel happy too; and though the merriment was
---------------
the substantial though homely supper had been despatched, and the little
---------------
party formed a social circle round the fire, Mr. Pickwick thought he
---------------
* Fast he stealeth on, though he wears no wings,
---------------
boy at her side; and though they were both poorly dressed--much more
---------------
from her, perhaps for ever. Oh! how the long-forgotten thoughts of
---------------
may be attributed the fact, that though several letters were despatched,
---------------
what bitter tears hers were. He thought how often he had run merrily
---------------
sorrow. The paling was low, though he well remembered the time that it
---------------
joyous sports. The convict thought on the many times he had shrunk from
---------------
word, and the hard stripe, and his mother's wailing; and though the
---------------
staring hard at the stranger, and though his eyes were lustreless and
---------------
Wardle. The spinster aunt heeded not the remark; she thought it applied
---------------
by his loquacity. 'Played it! Think I have--thousands of times--not
---------------
and Emily's thoughts appeared to be engrossed by some distant
---------------
'I should think so,' replied the jolly host.--'My dears, here's my
---------------
* Mr. Tupman thought of the widow at Rochester, and his mind was troubled.
---------------
he thought, with horrid delight, on the satisfaction it would afford
---------------
* 'What do you think I see in this very arbour last night?' inquired the
---------------
'Worse than that, Joe!' said the old lady, who had thought this the
---------------
* 'Damn that boy!' thought old Mr. Wardle to himself.--He had heard the
---------------
'Traitor!' thought the spinster aunt. 'Dear Mr. Jingle was not deceiving
---------------
and forgive me if I have ever, even in thought, done you the injustice
---------------
don't think I've heard his voice for two hours at least. Emily, my dear,
---------------
* 'Pretty situation,' thought Mr. Pickwick, when he had had a moment's
---------------
he had so thoughtlessly embarked. He was roused by a loud shouting of
---------------
father, "I never thought o' that."--"I think you wants one, Sir," says
---------------
Monday."--"Did you, though?" said my father.--"To be sure, we did," says
---------------
the lawyer.--"Wery well," says my father, after he'd thought a moment,
---------------
* 'You're one o' the adwice gratis order,' thought Sam, 'or you wouldn't
---------------
* 'I rather think it can be done,' said the bustling little man. 'Mr.
---------------
dear Sir, she is rather old. She comes of an old family though, my dear
---------------
destroying or preserving, as I thought proper. I can hardly believe that
---------------
the manuscript is genuine, though it certainly is not in my friend's
---------------
founded upon the ravings of some unhappy being (which I think more
---------------
'I think so too,' said Mr. Winkle. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
brandy-and-water, or the strange bed--whatever it was, his thoughts kept
---------------
partially dressed himself. Anything, he thought, was better than lying
---------------
entered his head. It was a good thought. If it failed to interest him,
---------------
knocked together with fright! I like it now though. It's a fine name.
---------------
found it out years before, though they had tried to keep it from me. Ha!
---------------
ha! I was too cunning for them, madman as they thought me. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
used to hug myself with delight, when I thought of the fine trick I was
---------------
laugh for joy, when I was alone, and thought how well I kept my secret,
---------------
with some fine roaring fellow, to think how pale he would have turned,
---------------
the faces of her needy relatives, as they thought of their well-planned
---------------
merriment. They little thought they had married her to a madman. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
mad--for though we madmen are sharp-witted enough, we get bewildered
---------------
found it out at last though. They could not keep it from me long. She
---------------
had never liked me; I had never thought she did: she despised my wealth,
---------------
She loved another. This I had never thought of. Strange feelings came
---------------
over me, and thoughts, forced upon me by some secret power, whirled
---------------
round and round my brain. I did not hate her, though I hated the boy she
---------------
live long; but the thought that before her death she might give birth
---------------
* 'For many weeks I thought of poison, and then of drowning, and then of
---------------
smouldering away to cinders. Think of the jest of a large reward, too,
---------------
all through a madman's cunning! I thought often of this, but I gave
---------------
* 'But though I had carried my object and killed her, I was restless and
---------------
last. Ha! ha! I think I see their frightened looks now, and feel the
---------------
I think of it. There--see how this iron bar bends beneath my furious
---------------
with many doors--I don't think I could find my way along them; and even
---------------
he thought I had not treated her well. He wished to know whether he was
---------------
The thoughtless riot, dissipation, and debauchery of his younger days
---------------
he detailed, though distorted in the description by his diseased
---------------
landscape, and his thoughts and feelings were as light and gay as the
---------------
* 'Sir,' said Mrs. Bardell again. 'Do you think it a much greater expense
---------------
eye (here he looked very hard at Mrs. Bardell) I think possesses these
---------------
* 'You'll think it very strange now,' said the amiable Mr. Pickwick, with
---------------
'Oh, I never thought anything of the trouble, sir,' replied Mrs.
---------------
'Ah, to be sure,' said Mr. Pickwick; 'I never thought of that. When I am
---------------
* 'I should think so,' replied Sam, with a patronising wink. 'Queer start
---------------
'Have you, though?' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
little man beside him, though, who took off his hat at intervals
---------------
* 'We are pretty confident, though,' said Mr. Perker, sinking his
---------------
* 'I have an idea upon this subject,' said Mr. Pott, 'which I think may be
---------------
protestations on that of Mr. Pickwick that he could not think of
---------------
rather think they'll amuse you.'
---------------
gen'l'm'n.--"Well, it is a wery bad 'un," says my father.--"I thought
---------------
* 'Why,' replied Sam very slowly, 'I rather think one old gen'l'm'n was
---------------
yourself, my dear Sir, I think it would make you very popular.'
---------------
* The speeches of the two candidates, though differing in every other
---------------
gifted, though prosy, Pott. It was in the evening that the 'commercial
---------------
* 'There's rummer things than women in this world though, mind you,' said
---------------
'I thought not.' Here the dirty-faced man fell into ecstasies of mirth
---------------
* 'I repudiate that qualification,' said Mr. Snodgrass, whose thoughts
---------------
it doesn't matter though, whether you did or not, because they retired
---------------
* 'The wind blew--not up the road or down it, though that's bad enough,
---------------
leading up to it. It was a comfortable-looking place though, for there
---------------
the more he thought of the tall man. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
chair at convivial dinners, and he had often thought how well he could
---------------
Tom would only have thought it was a queer chair, and there would have
---------------
again. He couldn't make anything of it though, so he got into bed,
---------------
whichever you like to call him. He stopped winking though, when Tom
---------------
rather staggered; though he pretended to carry it off so well. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
lap for hours together. What do you think of that, you dog, eh!" The old
---------------
* '"Just serves you right, old boy," thought Tom Smart; but he didn't say
---------------
And Tom sighed involuntarily, as he thought of the bar. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
modern abortions--all with arms, and with a degree of polish, though
---------------
lessen the queerness, he thought he might as well dress himself, and
---------------
he did it, only to show his white teeth; but Tom Smart thought that a
---------------
widow increased as she spoke. Thoughtful creature! Comfortable provider!
---------------
* 'The widow began to think it was high time to cry, so she took out her
---------------
he thought it like a gentleman to take away the character of another
---------------
whether it was with pleasure or bodily infirmity. He rather thought it
---------------
was the latter, though, for it never spoke afterwards.'
---------------
'I don't think I have,' said Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
geniuses, and any reasonable person would have thought it honour enough
---------------
thing to have it mangled when it's upon one, though--trying
---------------
'I think you are right, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'But I must first
---------------
* 'You're a rum 'un to look at, you are!' thought Mr. Weller, the first
---------------
'You're a rum 'un!' thought Mr. Weller; and thinking this, he went on
---------------
washing himself, and thought no more about him. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
you wear, and whose bread you eat, even though he is a scoundrel, Sir.'
---------------
they're so wery fine, and it's a pity he should lose 'em, I think he'd
---------------
'I think it might be very easily done.'
---------------
'I thought it very natural,' replied Job, 'that the old lady wouldn't
---------------
* 'I never see such a feller,' said Sam, 'Blessed if I don't think he's
---------------
* We cannot state the precise nature of the thoughts which passed through
---------------
other side of the wall, 'but I rather think that YOU have hurt me.'
---------------
* 'That's the time,' thought Mr. Pickwick, getting cautiously on his feet.
---------------
* 'This is very curious,' thought Mr. Pickwick. 'They are sitting up
---------------
purpose--exceedingly.' And with these thoughts, Mr. Pickwick cautiously
---------------
'That's not Job,' thought Mr. Pickwick, hastily drawing himself straight
---------------
governess, 'that his manservant keeps him, I think he's a madman, Miss
---------------
'I think you are very right, Miss Gwynn,' responded Miss Tomkins. 'Let
---------------
'I don't think he'll escape us quite so easily the next time, Sam!' said
---------------
* 'I don't think he will, Sir.'
---------------
The constitution of Mr. Pickwick, though able to sustain a very
---------------
* 'It IS matter of wonder, though, that anyone of Mr. Nathaniel Pipkin's
---------------
till night-time, and pondered on the beauty of Maria Lobbs. But though
---------------
he had often thought then, how briskly he would walk up to Maria Lobbs
---------------
But though he was afraid to make up to them, he couldn't bear to lose
---------------
seeming to disturb it, though; it had such a pleasant sound--and
---------------
to find that Maria Lobbs was not far off. And though the wicked little
---------------
might or might not have done, in consequence, if his thoughts had not
---------------
* 'The circumstance which directed his thoughts into a new channel was
---------------
swearing at him in a most Saracenic and ferocious manner, though
---------------
stormed away meanwhile, in the most wonderful manner. At last he thought
---------------
'I am sorry to record it of old Lobbs, but I think he would have struck
---------------
bright eyes, and, though they were tearful now, their influence was by
---------------
* 'Nathaniel Pipkin thought it best to keep his own counsel, and by so
---------------
Winkle thought. He returned Mr. Pott's gaze of stone, and in compliance
---------------
* Whatever thoughts the threat of a separation might have awakened in Mr.
---------------
* 'If he ever comes back, I'll poison him,' thought Mr. Pott, as he turned
---------------
* 'I'll have it explained, though,' said Mr. Pickwick, raising his head
---------------
steady goers to look at. I didn't think he'd ha' done it, though--I
---------------
didn't think he'd ha' done it!' Moralising in this strain, Mr. Samuel
---------------
observation; but he thought within himself, that if the party remained
---------------
good shots one of these days. I beg my friend Winkle's pardon, though;
---------------
'I think you had better, sir,' said the long gamekeeper, 'or you're
---------------
You are an older hand at this than I thought you, Tupman; you have been
---------------
'Why,' said the old gentleman, 'pretty hot. It's past twelve, though.
---------------
as made it, and is quite sure it ain't kittens; and arter all though,
---------------
in season till the winter though," says he. "Not in season!" says I.
---------------
prospect as if he thought the prospect ought to be highly gratified
---------------
* 'I beg your pardon, sir--but I think there have been trespassers here
---------------
* 'I think I'll wait,' said Mr. Pickwick. There was no reply; so Mr.
---------------
back; "the time was only out last night, Sir." "I do say it, though,"
---------------
writing, and to have as much thought or feeling. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'Pray, go on, sir--disgraceful and rascally proceedings, I think you
---------------
* 'I think it is, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'I KNOW it is,' said Mr.
---------------
seated at a respectful distance, though at the same table with his
---------------
as a vife, Sammy.' 'Don't she, though?' inquired Mr. Weller, junior. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'Well, what do you think of what your father says, Sam?' inquired Mr.
---------------
* 'Think, Sir!' replied Mr. Weller; 'why, I think he's the wictim o'
---------------
Mr. Pickwick glanced at the speaker, and thought that if it were washing
---------------
romantic. What fine places of slow torture they are! Think of the needy
---------------
only people never think of it.'
---------------
'I never thought of the romance of this particular subject before,
---------------
months. Everybody thought he'd gone out of town.'
---------------
dose of arsenic. The steward thought he had run away: opened the door,
---------------
* 'Strange!' said the little old man. 'Nonsense; you think them strange,
---------------
that's very true; I never thought of that before," said the ghost. "You
---------------
not wholly free from bugs; and I really think you might find much more
---------------
and anxious thoughts, were they there, a full hour too soon, and then
---------------
at that early hour, endeavour to interest his thoughts in the objects
---------------
and though the form of childhood was there, its light heart, its merry
---------------
on upon this, and upon each other, with thoughts of agony they dared
---------------
imprisonment; and though the change had been rendered necessary by their
---------------
away, from day to day; and though his brief existence had been a joyless
---------------
gnash his teeth in the other world, at the thought of the wealth his
---------------
* 'It was summer-time; and wrapped in his gloomy thoughts, he would issue
---------------
his hand--at our sufferings, then. What think you of them now! See
---------------
shall not think it dear, if you gain my object."
---------------
a moment's space; but if I had, one thought of her uncomplaining,
---------------
I think they calls it. I should wery much like to see that system in
---------------
'What do you think them women does t'other day,' continued Mr. Weller,
---------------
if they was a-dying. I thought it was rather sing'ler, but howsoever, I
---------------
* 'Yes, I think it is,' resumed Mr. Magnus. 'There's a good name before
---------------
Blessed if I don't think that ven a man's wery poor, he rushes out of
---------------
have any friends here or not, though. Is there any gentleman of the name
---------------
me or not, as you may think best; for I should never guess, if I were to
---------------
think so, Mr. Pickwick? Do you, though?'
---------------
* 'No; but you're joking, though.'
---------------
forenoon, and came down to seize the opportunity. I think an inn is a
---------------
'I think it is very probable,' replied that gentleman. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
a train of rambling meditations. First he thought of his friends, and
---------------
side, if he or she thought proper. Having carefully drawn the curtains
---------------
* 'Bless my soul!' thought Mr. Pickwick, 'what a dreadful thing!'
---------------
* 'I never met with anything so awful as this,' thought poor Mr. Pickwick,
---------------
* 'Most extraordinary female this,' thought Mr. Pickwick, popping in
---------------
* 'It's all over!' thought Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
gammoned by that 'ere mulberry man. I always thought, up to three days
---------------
one widder's equal to in pint o' comin' over you. I think it's
---------------
'Too much!' echoed Sam, 'I think it is too much--rayther! Now, what have
---------------
pause. 'To think that my master should have suspected the conversation
---------------
* 'Good-morning, Sir,' said Mr. Peter Magnus. 'What do you think of this,
---------------
* 'Yes, I think it'll do,' said Mr. Magnus. 'Mr. Pickwick, Sir, I have
---------------
'You think that may be taken for granted?' said Mr. Magnus; 'because, if
---------------
'I think she would,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'Upon this, sir, I should
---------------
a respectful kiss. I think I should kiss her, Mr. Magnus; and at this
---------------
which had only to be thought of to be done, as a matter of course. This
---------------
his thoughts from the failure of his enterprise, he stepped aside to see
---------------
* once more was a joint reply returned; and, though the words were
---------------
country attorney's office), whispered the magistrate that he thought
---------------
* 'I think you had better, sir,' whispered Jinks to the magistrate. 'An
---------------
'Therefore, I call upon you both, to--I think that's the course, Mr.
---------------
thought. He was a public man; and he turned paler, as he thought of
---------------
* 'What do you think of this request, Mr. Jinks?' murmured Mr. Nupkins. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* Mr. Jinks, who didn't exactly know what to think of it, and was afraid
---------------
'Wery sorry, Sir,' replied Mr. Weller; 'but when I think o' that 'ere
---------------
instance, though. At all events, Mr. Pickwick, we must despatch this
---------------
she had gained a little time to think the matter over; when she decided,
---------------
* 'Well, here's a game!' cried Sam. 'Only think o' my master havin' the
---------------
Porkenham--rich--fine fellow--not so rich as captain, though, eh?--turn
---------------
* 'I think you ought to see him,' replied Mrs. Cluppins. 'But on no
---------------
'I think two witnesses would be more lawful,' said Mrs. Sanders, who,
---------------
* 'I raly cannot contain myself,' said Mrs. Cluppins, 'when I think of
---------------
* 'The action's going on, and no mistake,' thought Sam, as Mrs. Bardell
---------------
* 'I rayther think he is,' said the imperturbable Sam; 'and I hope this
---------------
* 'No offence, sir, no offence,' replied Sam; 'you're wery right, though;
---------------
* Sam thought it was, too, but he held his peace. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
out, they rattled the pennies in it, till you'd ha' thought that no
---------------
d'ye think it was all for?'
---------------
alphabet, is a matter o' taste. I rayther think it isn't.' 'Well,' said
---------------
raly, Sammy-would you, though?'
---------------
but he thought you'd rather walk, being a cold day.'
---------------
to think it a very interesting sort of thing to see Mr. Weller working
---------------
* 'I should rayther ha' thought, to look at you, that you was a-labourin'
---------------
* 'Can you drive?' said the fat boy. 'I should rayther think so,' replied
---------------
raised towards the old lady's face, called up a thought of old times,
---------------
style; that the young ladies generally thought it far less shocking than
---------------
immortal Horner--he had been devouring a Christmas pie, though not with
---------------
However, there was no time to think more about the matter, for the
---------------
semi-cannibalic leer at Mr. Weller, as he thought of the roast legs and
---------------
of all beholders. The poor relations caught the people who they thought
---------------
feeling very low, he thought it might raise his spirits, perhaps, if
---------------
he had bought it of the smugglers, and he thought that perhaps his
---------------
'The sexton gasped for breath. '"What do you think of this, Gabriel?"
---------------
fright; "very curious, and very pretty, but I think I'll go back and
---------------
they can, Sir; they don't know me, Sir; I don't think the gentlemen have
---------------
* '"What do you think of THAT?" said the goblin, turning his large face
---------------
* 'But he was an altered man, and he could not bear the thought of
---------------
* 'Just that, sir,' replied Sam. 'These here ones as is below, though,
---------------
* 'I really think you had better,' said Allen. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
porter, and think there's nothing like 'life.' There are varieties of
---------------
* 'Ah! I thought so,' said Mr. Jackson, more affably than before. 'I've a
---------------
'I think I ain't mistaken when I say your name's Tupman, am I?'
---------------
* 'Now,' said Jackson, 'I'm afraid you'll think me rather troublesome, but
---------------
primest parts of the meat in the manafacter o' sassages, I'd think you'd
---------------
'When do you think he'll be back?' inquired the stranger. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'You don't think it would be of any use my waiting for him?' said the
---------------
exquisite piece of humour was going forward, though what it was Mr.
---------------
compromise, I suppose,' replied Perker. 'It don't matter much, though; I
---------------
don't think many counsel could get a great deal out of HIM.'
---------------
'I don't think they could,' said Mr. Pickwick, smiling, despite his
---------------
'Ah, I thought not,' said the Serjeant, in that sort of pitying tone in
---------------
before him in the course of the action, and had thought of nothing else,
---------------
conversation to me. I don't think I let these apartments to you, Sir.'
---------------
say he wouldn't. There must be a splendid operation, though,
---------------
swallowed a bead. Child thought it capital fun, went back next day, and
---------------
eagerly at the door, as he thought he heard the noise of glasses
---------------
'Hush! I beg your pardon. I thought I heard somebody calling from
---------------
* 'I think I hear it now,' said Mr. Pickwick. 'Have the goodness to open
---------------
Hopkins,' said the wretched Mr. Bob Sawyer, 'but I think the best plan
---------------
air to the young lady in the bar; 'blessed if I think he hardly knows
---------------
reproachful accents, 'I didn't think you'd ha' done it. Arter the
---------------
dyin' day! I didn't think you'd ha' done it, Sammy, I didn't think you'd
---------------
* 'But don't you think it means more?' inquired Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'Yes, I think it is rayther good,' observed Sam, highly flattered. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* '"Afore I see you, I thought all women was alike."'
---------------
though I like you better than nothin' at all." I thought it best to make
---------------
'"Except of me Mary my dear as your walentine and think over what I've
---------------
mean?' said Sam; 'you don't think he's a-goin' to be tried at the Old
---------------
winked so indefatigably after doing so, that Sam began to think he must
---------------
I rather think--but don't let that influence you--I RATHER think the
---------------
that they think so too--as of course they do; and then they get on very
---------------
best terms with themselves, and makes them think what sharp fellows
---------------
jury with the belief that he always thought most deeply with his eyes
---------------
* Mrs. Cluppins having once broken the ice, thought it a favourable
---------------
Mr. Winkle obeyed the mandate, and looked at the place where he thought
---------------
the baker, but should think that the baker was not very fond of Mrs.
---------------
Bardell, or he wouldn't have married somebody else. Thought Mrs. Bardell
---------------
his spirits; 'I thought we should get at something at last.'
---------------
'I rayther thought that, too, sir,' replied Sam; and at this the
---------------
that Mr. Pickwick was wrong, and if they thought the evidence of Mrs.
---------------
damages as they thought proper; and if, on the other hand, it appeared
---------------
* Fogg said they thought it rather probable. Dodson smiled, and said
---------------
'Ha! ha!' laughed Dodson. 'You'll think better of that, before next
---------------
destination, I say Bath. I think none of us have ever been there.'
---------------
change and gaiety he would be inclined to think better of his
---------------
them away when he thought nobody was looking at him. There was a third
---------------
'The reports of the trial in those confounded papers,' thought Mr.
---------------
'I should think they wos,' replied Sam. 'Affable, unaffected,
---------------
only think what a loss you would be!' With these pathetic words, Sam
---------------
waistcoat, and was, if possible, just a thought more scented. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'Gwacious heavens!' said his Lordship, 'I thought evewebody had seen the
---------------
* 'Good God, Jane, how can you think of such things?' replied the mamma
---------------
I thought I wasn't engaged, ma.'
---------------
were very much delighted, though they had not been previously aware that
---------------
had a fellow-feeling--for he too was wise--a pig of thoughtful and
---------------
he looked upon the countenance of the majestic swine; he thought of his
---------------
already begun to dawn, though feebly), but in the cold, sharp days of
---------------
hardships by sweet thoughts of the Athenian maid, who was the innocent
---------------
the more you think of this, the more your hopes of their speedy arrival
---------------
'I must keep awake. I suppose I shall hear a knock here. Yes. I thought
---------------
so. I can hear the watchman. There he goes. Fainter now, though. A
---------------
everything in; and ultimately he began to think it just within the
---------------
superscription; and, as a last resource, thought perhaps he might as
---------------
immovable state of calmness, he thought better of it, and looked affable
---------------
* 'What did you think of 'em, Sir?'
---------------
'I thought they was particklery unpleasant,' replied Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'I don't know much about that 'ere,' said Sam. 'I thought they'd a wery
---------------
'They won't be wery cruel, though, will they?' inquired Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
'Well, well, Mr. Weller,' said the gentleman in blue, 'I think she has
---------------
'I should think she couldn't wery well be off o' that,' said Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
course I should ha' made up to vun on 'em. As it is, I don't think I
---------------
Sam thought it would be a pity to contradict him, and so let him have
---------------
has thought proper to pursue.'
---------------
* 'You think you can find him, Sam?' said Mr. Pickwick, looking earnestly
---------------
* 'Perfectly,' replied Pickwick. 'Thoroughly. Do what you think necessary.
---------------
you in my arms,' said Bob Sawyer; 'but upon my life, I thought you were
---------------
I think the Church-rates guesses who I am, and I know the Water-works
---------------
'I shouldn't have thought it!' exclaimed Mr. Winkle, much surprised. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* We think we have hinted elsewhere, that Mr. Benjamin Allen had a way of
---------------
* 'And I think,' said Mr. Ben Allen, in conclusion. 'I think there's a
---------------
* 'I'd show him what I thought of him,' said Mr. Ben Allen. And round went
---------------
cunning; 'I didn't think Wardle's exactly the place for a headstrong
---------------
few months at an old aunt's, in a nice, dull, close place. I think that
---------------
Winkle, he thought it better to bear with them, than, by any act of
---------------
* 'I thought it better to come myself,' said Mr. Pickwick, addressing Mr.
---------------
* Sam thought he might as well talk to this groom as to any one else,
---------------
o' my acquaintance, which I thought he had. Don't wait here out o'
---------------
belonging to as many houses, which though detached from each other, were
---------------
* Sam was so very busy with his own thoughts, that it is probable he would
---------------
he began to think it was not going to take place at all, when he heard
---------------
* 'Ah, indeed,' said Sam. 'Ve thought ve should ha' been obliged to
---------------
resolutely declined (most unaccountably, as Sam thought) to avail
---------------
Weller; 'but wen you don't want to be seen, I think they're more useful
---------------
* 'Now, it's in the stable, and they'll think the place is afire,' said
---------------
if I don't think his heart must ha' been born five-and-twenty year arter
---------------
'What do you think of it, Pruffle?'
---------------
'Come betveen us, sir. Not half a mile to run. Think you're vinnin' a
---------------
* One of these was a mere boy of nineteen or twenty, who, though it
---------------
of course the boy (who thought his companion one of the most dashing
---------------
'I rather think I have!' replied the boy. He had looked at it through
---------------
most intent and thoughtful faces. Mr. Pickwick winced a good deal under
---------------
* 'You wouldn't think to find such a room as this in the Farringdon Hotel,
---------------
thought it, or that he would not have thought it, or that he had
---------------
never thought anything at all about it, as the observer's imagination
---------------
with a look of excessive disgust--'I should think poppies was nothing to
---------------
to rest at whatever hour he thought proper, without any further notice
---------------
'I think you're right, Sam,' said Mr. Pickwick, after a few moments'
---------------
After a few thoughtful turns in the Painted Ground, which, as it was now
---------------
dark, was nearly deserted, he intimated to Mr. Weller that he thought
---------------
entered his thoughts. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'You don't think there is any probability of his appropriating the money
---------------
* 'I should think so,' replied the party addressed, with a strong emphasis
---------------
Fox-under-the-Hill by the wharf there. I think I can see him now,
---------------
of a taciturn and thoughtful cast, merely echoed the inquiry; Mr. Roker,
---------------
shaking off the poetical and gloomy train of thought into which he had
---------------
'Ah, so I thought,' rejoined Mr. Roker, closing the book, and placing
---------------
* 'I think Roker might have chummed you somewhere else,' said Mr. Simpson
---------------
* Mr. Pickwick thought so also; but, under all the circumstances, he
---------------
else? I thought I could not.'
---------------
* 'Vell, sir,' rejoined Sam, after a short pause, 'I think I see your
---------------
* 'Are you, though?' replied the person to whom the assurance was pledged. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
should think it would be his turn in about half an hour. I told my clerk
---------------
'I think you was remarkin' as you wouldn't have no objection to another
---------------
'Wery queer,' said Sam. 'I think she's a-injurin' herself gradivally
---------------
Some thoughts of the rum appeared to obtrude themselves on Mr. Weller's
---------------
mind, as he said this; for he looked gloomy and thoughtful; but he very
---------------
'I think I'd better see arter it at once,' said Sam, still hesitating. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
Weller thought it prudent to change the theme of the discourse. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
many crumpets, at a sittin', do you think 'ud kill me off at once?"
---------------
half-a-crown's wurth 'ud do it?" says the patient. "I think it might,"
---------------
* 'I don't think that,' said Sam, shaking his head. 'There's wery little
---------------
when he had finished speaking; and though the glance they exchanged was
---------------
topics, and Mr. Winkle gradually appeared more at ease, though still
---------------
when he thought he heard his own name proclaimed in some distant
---------------
replied the old gentleman. 'I think a pipe vould benefit me a good deal.
---------------
rubbed his head with a rueful visage. 'Wot do you think o' that, for a
---------------
lady and Mr. Stiggins; 'I think there must be somethin' wrong in your
---------------
he thought all this, but kept it to himself. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I think it vill, mum,' replied Sam. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
Dodson and Fogg's hung (wich last ewent I think is the most likely to
---------------
I think you are. Hush! not a word, Sam; not a syllable. Here he is.'
---------------
* 'I should think they had,' exclaimed Mr. Weller, surveying his
---------------
'Better, Sir. I think I am better,' responded Job. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
and gaiters--not even in spectacles, as I remember, though that may ha'
---------------
will see how your health becomes, and think about it meanwhile. Make
---------------
'Oh! I should think you was a deal too lively and sought after, to be
---------------
must be, to you, to think how it's been done! This is the Fleet, ma'am.
---------------
his house; but as it's Mr. Pickwick's, I think I may venture to take a
---------------
was sitting at the window in a thoughtful attitude. 'Wery glad you've
---------------
looked in accidentally, Sir. I rather think the gov'nor wants to have a
---------------
decided as they thought right, and it IS against you. You have now
---------------
I ask you to think of them. Turn them over in your mind as long as you
---------------
head. 'If you know'd who was near, sir, I rayther think you'd change
---------------
forgotten it. I have never ceased to think how great your sufferings
---------------
wos wery gen'rous and thoughtful, and he only wished you could have
---------------
tampering with her, and attempting to engage her affections. I think I
---------------
but I think I had better speak to Mr. Sawyer, alone, for a moment. Only
---------------
'I should be very sorry to think it was the heart,' said the old lady,
---------------
no suspicion that an immediate marriage was even contemplated. Though,
---------------
'but merely this here. P'raps that gen'l'm'n may think as there wos a
---------------
principal inducement for going away. He thought of Mrs. Bardell; and
---------------
'I think I've seen you before.'
---------------
* 'He was a wonderful man, that uncle of yours, though,' remarked the
---------------
* 'Well, I think he was; I think I may say he was,' answered the one-eyed
---------------
him, gentlemen. On second thoughts, gentlemen, I don't wish you had
---------------
size; he was a thought stouter too, than the ordinary run of people, and
---------------
she wouldn't have known him. Indeed, when I come to think of the matter,
---------------
was two years and seven months old, and I think it's very likely that,
---------------
them too often before, to think them worthy of much notice now, my
---------------
which had a little cleared up, though the moon was sinking, walked on
---------------
* 'My uncle rested his head upon his hands, and thought of the busy,
---------------
and were now as silent and changed; he thought of the numbers of people
---------------
they all now? 'Gentlemen, my uncle used to SAY that he thought all
---------------
Now, my uncle was never a fast thinker, and if he had thought all these
---------------
* 'At present, however, his thoughts were occupied with the young lady who
---------------
leaned back in the coach, and thought of the beautiful face, and the
---------------
* '"Oh! you've thought better of it, have you?" said the guard, when he
---------------
smoke. On second thoughts, however, he abandoned this plan, as being a
---------------
room specially ordered for the occasion, I should think the public room
---------------
there?" My uncle was rather disappointed, gentlemen, for he thought
---------------
The lady happened to bend forward at the same time, and my uncle thought
---------------
excursions. And I think he was right, gentlemen--at least I never heard
---------------
* 'Oh, ah! To be sure,' rejoined the landlord. 'I never thought of that.'
---------------
* 'Bless me, you are surely not mad enough to think of leaving your
---------------
'Don't think of me for a minute,' replied Bob. 'I've arranged it all;
---------------
question through his spectacles with some interest; 'I rather think it
---------------
'I think it would be best to take it in,' replied Mr. Ben Allen; 'it
---------------
'I think it the most proper course we could possibly adopt,' replied
---------------
* 'I THINK so,' rejoined Mr. Pickwick, very properly guarding himself
---------------
'Do you think so?' replied Mr. Pickwick. 'Well; if you are curious to
---------------
reading the letter, as Mr. Bob Sawyer thought, chanced to be looking
---------------
* 'I thought you did, Sir,' replied the old gentleman, with indignant
---------------
party went silent and supperless to bed; and Mr. Pickwick thought, just
---------------
* 'No,' replied Bob Sawyer. 'I don't think I ever did.'
---------------
* 'I think it's quite impossible to go on to-night,' interposed Ben. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
profound and thoughtful features of Mr. Pott, of the Eatanswill GAZETTE. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
GAZETTE. I think I may venture to say that you would not be long in
---------------
appointments for mortal combat next day. When they came to think it
---------------
first time, ejaculated thoughtfully, as he folded it up--
---------------
room, and arrange the cap and curls before she could think of presenting
---------------
'No, Sammy,' replied Mr. Weller, again looking thoughtfully at the fire.
---------------
than me; but I hope ven I'm gone, Veller, that you'll think on me as I
---------------
eighty mile o' females, and yet nobody think that he ever means to marry
---------------
'Wery kind o' the old lady to think o' me,' said Sam, 'and I'm wery much
---------------
* 'I think there's something,' said Stiggins, turning as pale as he could
---------------
'I think that's wery likely, from what he said,' rejoined Sam; 'he wos
---------------
'Was he, though?' exclaimed Stiggins, brightening up. 'Ah! He's changed,
---------------
of your husband's communication. If not, I have thought of half a dozen
---------------
* 'This is a distressing predicament for these young people,' thought Mr.
---------------
half hour as I came through the Polygon. I'm here before him, though, so
---------------
'Ah!' said Mr. Pickwick, with a smile. 'I always thought him the
---------------
only shows how one may be deceived. What do you think of his going to
---------------
* 'Yes, I think you had better. Here, you Sir, what's your name, walk in,
---------------
* 'Do you think he will come round?' inquired Mr. Pickwick. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
* 'I think he will,' rejoined Perker. 'If not, we must try the young
---------------
Sir. I thought I knew the face,' said Fogg, drawing up a chair, and
---------------
'I don't think you are looking quite so stout as when I had the pleasure
---------------
you thought proper to express in our office in Freeman's Court,
---------------
* 'Take care, Sir,' said Dodson, who, though he was the biggest man of the
---------------
he supposed he ought to be very angry, but he couldn't think of the
---------------
* 'I think it is a knock at the door,' said Mr. Pickwick, as if there
---------------
* 'Mean!' replied Wardle. 'Why, I think the girls are all running mad;
---------------
make the least impression upon them. They thought it such a much
---------------
over this marriage affair. "Well, pa," she says, "what do you think of
---------------
fire at the time, drinking my grog rather thoughtfully, and I knew my
---------------
as young as I used to be then, though not quite so light-hearted. "It's
---------------
disposed to both of them, they had thought it better in the first
---------------
eyes to their usual size again, and to let me hear what you think we
---------------
heavy sigh, and, remaining thoughtful for a few moments, drank a long
---------------
'Don't I, though?' replied the fat boy. 'I say?'
---------------
The fat boy looked from the pie-dish to the steak, as if he thought a
---------------
* 'Very lucky I had the presence of mind to avoid them,' thought Mr.
---------------
* 'I think you're right,' whispered Wardle across the table. 'He is
---------------
Ben Allen replied that he thought he was; and, as that gentleman had
---------------
'Inflammable,' mildly suggested Mr. Pickwick, who thought something
---------------
funeral, 'I've found it, Sammy. I thought it wos there.'
---------------
* 'You think so now,' said Mr. Weller, with the gravity of age, 'but
---------------
I actually thought more than once that he'd have sunk under 'em; I did,
---------------
* 'I don't think he ever quite recovered them,' replied Pell; 'in fact I'm
---------------
man has no right to think of his private friendships when his legal
---------------
* 'Stop! I bar,' said Wilkins Flasher, Esquire, thoughtfully. 'Perhaps he
---------------
* 'How should I know?' retorted Mr. Weller; 'I thought they looked wery
---------------
been for the prompt, though, at first sight, undutiful behaviour of Sam,
---------------
his chin with his left hand as he did so, appeared lost in thought. ( Dickens The Pickwick papers )
---------------
Mr. Weller shook his head. He was wholly unable to speak; vague thoughts
---------------
* 'What did you think of her, now? Candidly, Mr. Weller, what did you
---------------
'I thought she wos wery plump, and vell made,' said Mr. Weller, with a
---------------
* 'So she is,' said Mr. Pickwick, 'so she is. What did you think of her
---------------
to obtain a decent living, what should you think of it, Mr. Weller?'
---------------
'How do I know that 'ere, sir?' argued Sam. 'You think so now! S'pose
---------------
should. You know my name, though, ma'am.'
---------------
'Do I?' said Arabella, trembling, though she scarcely knew why. 'May I
---------------
work, and becoming greatly agitated as a thought, that had occurred to
---------------
fell in love with you, I suppose? Yes it was, though,' said the old
---------------
Mr. Tupman) were disposed to think that Mr. Pickwick contemplated
---------------
* They were welcomed heartily though, for riches or poverty had no
---------------
address: in a castle in Spain. The castle, however, was solid though
---------------
some people got to think you knew without looking, so to speak. And
---------------
Carlotta Brownson gave a lecture on Thought-Forms with illustrations
---------------
can think of stopping it is for you to tell us the secret after all."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
moment, as if full of a silent convulsion of thought. Then he lifted his
---------------
Brown, "I had thought out exactly how a thing like that could be done,
---------------
merely moral, people always think it's merely metaphorical. A real live
---------------
believe it?' And then he thought I meant he needn't believe in anything
---------------
means. I mean that I thought and thought about how a man might come to
---------------
dry light may sometimes do good; though in one sense it's the very
---------------
inside a murderer, thinking his thoughts, wrestling with his passions;
---------------
secret magic connected with Thought-Forms, could I? I've put it badly,
---------------
Chace, lifting his glass thoughtfully. "Can you give me any examples, I
---------------
* "And you don't think detective stories allow for that?" asked his
---------------
* "Well, I think he's innocent myself," said the little priest in a
---------------
* "Why do you think he is innocent?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Yes, I think it does," said the priest mildly. "The truth is, that when
---------------
I came in at the front door I saw something I don't think any of the
---------------
glass, though they might have broken it with a stray kick or anything.
---------------
* The other rooms, however, revealed very little, though Bagshaw pointed
---------------
* "That's rather odd," said Bagshaw sharply. "I thought the front door
---------------
across the lawn. Bagshaw thought it a curious cul-de-sac in which to
---------------
developing his line of accusation. With a boldness which some thought
---------------
two whole families almost in silence. I think he says that Williams had
---------------
hair of a vivid unnatural yellow; and that he thought it had been dyed
---------------
* "Well, Father Brown," he said with a smile; "what do you think of our
---------------
* "Well," replied the priest rather absently, "I think the thing that
---------------
They would think he must be rather eccentric; but he isn't at all
---------------
eccentric, he's only conventional. They would think so, because they
---------------
a poet would think nothing of walking about in the same backyard for ten
---------------
* "Have you thought about the servant, Green?" asked Father Brown,
---------------
* "Ah," cried Bagshaw quickly, "you think Green did it, after all."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
was a very good one, though I don't quite agree with it. You suppose the
---------------
didn't say that. I never thought that. What I think I said, was that
---------------
all short and shabby; none of them could have thought his own image was
---------------
was thoughtful enough to follow his accuser home; he also being in
---------------
in a science about bad ones. Yet I think our general experience is that
---------------
Crake. "The list sounds rather long and dull; but I think it's
---------------
abstract. There is such a thing as irrational antipathy, though it's
---------------
breakfast table of a worthy though wealthy suburban family named Bankes,
---------------
interesting to talk to. I think John has had some business with him."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
expression of concentrated thought. His thoughts would, perhaps, have
---------------
Carver, though he threw off the momentary air of sinister significance
---------------
in an ox wagon. Do you think cars haven't changed in ten years --and
---------------
are going round. You think you're just flying."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "But think what fun it will be for your sister to see you arrive in a
---------------
* "Well," said Mr. Smith, blinking thoughtfully, "I don't want to be
---------------
selfish, and I don't think I'm afraid-I'll come with you if you put it
---------------
* "Yes," replied Father Brown. "And what do you think about it?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
said. "But I think I can explain how the business happens to concern
---------------
disgust. "Bolted off while I was looking at what I thought was a
---------------
equably, "and I think the face you saw----"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
great goggles and a red, ragged beard like Judas. I thought it was a
---------------
for him to so defend himself. But even as he had the thought, came the
---------------
solemnity, though not without nervousness.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
"But I think there will be nothing for you to worry about. There's a
---------------
be friends with all our neighbours. But you can't think we do nothing.
---------------
You can't think we know nothing. We mind our own business; but we know
---------------
* "No, the more I thought of it the more I felt there was something funny
---------------
* "The very last man I should have thought of," said Devine.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "The very first man I thought of," said Father Brown; "in so far as I
---------------
had any right to think of anybody. My friend, there are no good or bad
---------------
the neighbouring provincial town, he traced a rapid train of thought
---------------
named Francis Boyle, though an Irishman and not credited with caution,
---------------
conversation of which the goldfish were the text, though the offensive
---------------
doors as if it were a mediaeval fortress, though really these rotten old
---------------
forgotten we were talking with words. In the east we talk with thoughts,
---------------
mass psychology. I don't think those tricks have ever been played in an
---------------
realized that, though neither he nor the gate had moved, he was actually
---------------
* "Anything may happen anywhere," said the smiling Mr. Smith. "I think you
---------------
sleeper of the two. Though active enough when he was once awake, he
---------------
and he thought he was still dreaming.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
to smash. But the fish are gone, God knows how, though I think our
---------------
from London though by a later train, seemed again and again to attract
---------------
you thought so improbable look a little more realistic to-day than
---------------
Mr. Pinner's, especially about me. I rather think I am under suspicion."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "I think we are all under suspicion," said the Count.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
who was frowning thoughtfully at the ground as he listened, suddenly
---------------
* "I've never even seen him," answered Boyle. "I don't think anybody's
---------------
* "Very well," answered Father Brown, "then I think we'll go indoors
---------------
* "No; I think that settles the matter of entrances," said the turnip
---------------
these Eastern travellers have anything to do with it? Do you think it
---------------
life we hardly see it, and if we did we might think it quite odd. If the
---------------
* "Well, I rather thought you wouldn't," said the other equably. "There's
---------------
"You thought it very wild and wonderful that an Arab should come through
---------------
wizard or a troubadour for six minutes, do you think he could not act a
---------------
were mad; but the thought of his good fortune in inhabiting the only
---------------
mantelpieces and his autograph in many albums. For though Norman Knight
---------------
drama. But her husband did not think much of problem plays; and
---------------
on a hat peg, I really thought perhaps he'd better be here. Jarvis has
---------------
lamb. But he did not seem to think much of the suggestion of suicide.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "They always are," growled Mr. Mundon Mandeville. "And I thought my wife
---------------
* "It's not to be thought of," declared Norman Knight firmly. "Why, I
---------------
lower voice: "Do you think she can have done herself in?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
If she had been a German, gone away to think quietly about metaphysics
---------------
great actresses of the age; indeed, the highbrow critics still think a
---------------
the door; but I think I once saw a veiled or cloaked figure passing out
---------------
don't think it's love-making. I think it's blackmail."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "What makes you think that?" asked the other.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "You think he's a bigamist," said Father Brown reflectively. "Well,
---------------
unknown visitor has got in here again? Do you think it's anything
---------------
* "Perhaps we think too much about the stranger," said Father Brown.
---------------
afterwards he said thoughtfully: "That Mrs. Sands is a grumpy and gloomy
---------------
* "No," said the priest calmly; "I think I meant it more or less as a
---------------
or question a dead body. Lying beside it, though not immediately visible
---------------
* "We must send for the police," he said; "and for a doctor, though the
---------------
* "The Italian!" cried his friend; "I should think not. I should have
---------------
have got in this end. I think she might have got out the other end."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Nil nisi bonum indeed," said Jarvis grimly. "I don't think Randall at
---------------
don't you think it probably was the strange woman?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
meeting; the woman who said she was his wife. Do you think she really
---------------
chiefly on Lady Miriam and her friend in the box; though there is the
---------------
* There was a silence and then the actor said: "You think she slipped
---------------
probable fashion," said the other. "I think it all the more probable
---------------
difficulties, of course, but I think they could all be met in time and
---------------
* "Yes," said the secretary harshly, "I think I know what has happened to
---------------
* "I think you and Dalmon can testify," he said, "that you saw me sitting
---------------
* "The only thing I can think of," went on Dr. Abbott slowly; and then the
---------------
you will come with me, I think I can give you his address and --and tell
---------------
stick to it, though it really isn't my confession, but somebody else's."
---------------
river; and I suppose the mystery made him attractive, though I admit he
---------------
is attractive enough; a gentleman, and quite witty, though very
---------------
he wants out of him. In plain words, you think Dalmon is a blackmailer."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* Father Brown reflected for a moment and then said: "I think I should
---------------
that. It's all very beastly, but we don't think there's been-- any
---------------
thing you've seen," he said. "I think it's seeing the face upside down.
---------------
up in the hamlet, somehow; after all, I don't think he committed
---------------
row about it, of course, but many people thought Vaudrey had acted in a
---------------
* "Then you don't think it had anything to do with the story we are
---------------
considering?" asked the secretary, thoughtfully.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "I think it had a thundering lot to do with the story I am considering
---------------
"Tobacconist! Is the tobacconist by any chance... .? But I think I'll
---------------
act on my guess till I know. Only, I'll tell you what it was I thought
---------------
own thoughts. And what thoughts! Nor, I think, was Dalmon alarmed. He
---------------
that; though, of course, that was horrible enough, in its way. But that
---------------
point like that." He paused, as if collecting his thoughts after his
---------------
Indeed, he did not want to look at the pictures, though he liked
---------------
with a certain relief, though with a slight start as of awakening, that
---------------
* "No," answered the priest; "but I should hardly have thought he was a
---------------
secret, though they say be does hide himself in a castle. Isn't he the
---------------
"I thought I did. At least I think I thought I did. But I've just had
---------------
* "I don't think he's flirting with her," said Father Brown.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Look here," he cried, speaking naturally enough, though they fancied
---------------
* "I think he's a late sort of host, if it comes to chat," grumbled
---------------
Father Brown. "I think it's very decent of him to see us at all: two
---------------
seem either surprised or embarrassed at the rare visitation; though they
---------------
eyebrows and a long chin, and though the carefully-curled hair he wore
---------------
on, even though they do not grace it. From father to son our heritage
---------------
* "Yes," said Father Brown thoughtfully; "I see what you mean."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Thank you, Sir John," said the priest in a dull voice, "but I think we
---------------
people are blackmailing him about it. For the third, I think I do know.
---------------
and long-lived stock, and even in the ordinary way I should think you
---------------
can't last indefinitely. The old man is nearly eighty, though he still
---------------
"When you come to think of it, it's a very good plan for a murder, and
---------------
* "Ah," said Granby thoughtfully, "the legal negotiations! You mean, of
---------------
in his hard, legal face, "I think we must exhaust the possibilities of
---------------
the Germans--well! So I think if a fortune-teller is trading in truth
---------------
* "Yes," said the other; "I think he is trading with the enemy."(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
thinks they're good so long as they're frauds, I should think he'd
---------------
* "I think there is a via media between sense and nonsense," said
---------------
* "I think so," said his hostess equally gravely. "When he wants to be
---------------
except Oriental religion and philosophy; and had thought it necessary
---------------
the tactful Mr. Hardcastle thought it time to create a diversion. He
---------------
on a mummy-case. But though the figure of the Master of the Mountain
---------------
* "If you were to be utterly, unfathomably, silent, do you think you might
---------------
precisely the same spot where Hardcastle had thoughtlessly laid it down.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "I don't think you want to feel any more, do you?" said the priest good
---------------
without reason. Why don't you think the ruby had been there all the
---------------
besides, I don't think the Mounteagles would prosecute, now they've got
---------------
* After a pause he went on thoughtfully. "Right away back in that argument
---------------
style. But Hunter thought it all sheer fraud and wanted to show it up.
---------------
That seems inconsistent. He thought in this case it was crystal-
---------------
* "I thought so at first," replied the priest; "but I know now it was not
---------------
likely he wouldn't; very likely he wouldn't think it worth stealing. It
---------------
stealing that he yielded today. He liked us to think that he had
---------------
space; and even when he hadn't done it, he allowed us to think he had.
---------------
opposite shame. We should all be anxious that nobody should think we had
---------------
done it. He was actually anxious that everybody should think he had--even
---------------
never want us to think he did it, for he also was an English gentleman.
---------------
shock of light; for though the skies were rainy it was the first flash
---------------
"About a minute and half between the flash and the bang, but I think the
---------------
the lightning, but we shall want it soon for the rain. I think it will
---------------
leper, though he may he almost as lonely. And he had only one head and
---------------
* "I suppose it's a compliment to us," she replied thoughtfully, "that you
---------------
with a high-bridged nose; though I suppose the young people would
---------------
him, as a matter of fact, but I don't think it ever came first with him,
---------------
and I think it went with the rest when everything else went. Like Hamlet
---------------
* "You think he knows more than she does?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "I think he knows more than she says," answered Father Brown. "You tell
---------------
made me think so.(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Better than the ugly things you thought of, I suppose?" said the
---------------
survivor. I thought he did not need any monkish vampires to make him
---------------
friend; though he's richer now than any aristocrat. So his serving as
---------------
second proves very little about what he thought of the quarrel. They
---------------
probably part of the links, though in those days no Englishman had heard
---------------
* "Did Romaine stand motionless?" asked the priest. "I should have thought
---------------
had made a good choice in the matter of doctors; though the doctor came
---------------
too late, he came quicker than I should have thought possible. This
---------------
would think it would be done for the sake of appearances. Anyhow, when
---------------
* "Really, Father Brown," said General Outram, "do you honestly think he
---------------
* "Are you mad?" demanded the other. "Or why should you think I am blind?"(Chesterton The secret of father Brown )
---------------
* "Hang it all," exploded the general; "if you think I'm going to be
---------------
if you think what it would really be like to be a revolutionary poet.
---------------
of them. Then I thought of another sort of heathen; the sort that is not
---------------
destroying the world but entirely depending on the world. I thought
---------------
who would commit any crime--to save his respectability. Think what
---------------
* "Some people would think it was rather morbid," said Grandison Chace
---------------
* "Some people," said Father Brown gravely, "undoubtedly do think that
---------------
it by morbidity. But I most certainly don't want them to think I do it
---------------
* "Well, I'm afraid I do think it's morbid," he said frankly. "And I'm not
---------------
ruby; or the Count the goldfish; though a man like Bankes might easily
---------------
* "It takes you quite a long time to feel so crudely as that, though. It's
---------------
* "You may think a crime horrible because you could never commit it. I
---------------
think it horrible because I could commit it. You think of it as
---------------
* "If a criminal appeared in this room," said Chace, smiling, "I think you
---------------
or cut his mother's throat. Frankly, I don't think it's practical. I
---------------
and pursuers really had to deal with crime. Do you think I do not know
---------------
dreamed of such depravity? Do you think all that ever did anything but
---------------
suppose you thought me capable of playing you such a trick while I was
---------------
accrued asset
= rateo attivo ,
---------------
accrued income
= rateo attivo ,
---------------
accrued revenue
= rateo attivo ,
---------------
activate
= attivare , rendere attivo , rendere radioattivo , azionare , allestire , lanciare ,
---------------
activated
= attivato , reso attivo , reso radioattivo , azionato , allestito , lanciato , ubriaco , brillo ,
---------------
activated carbon
= carbone attivo , carbone attivato ,
---------------
activated complex
= complesso attivo ,
---------------
activates
= attiva , rende attivo , rende radioattivo , aziona , allestisce , lancia ,
---------------
activating
= attivando , rendendo attivo , rendendo radioattivo , azionando , allestendo , lanciando ,
---------------
active
= attivo , sveglio , svelto , vivace , pronto , fattivo , effettivo , in movimento , in corso di esecuzione , in corso di utilizzazione , in servizio ,
---------------
active account
= conto attivo ,
---------------
active balance
= saldo attivo ,
---------------
active balance of payments
= bilancia dei pagamenti attiva , saldo attivo della bilancia dei pagamenti ,
---------------
active balance of trade
= bilancia commerciale attiva , saldo attivo della bilancia commerciale ,
---------------
active duty
= servizio attivo , servizio permanente effettivo ,
---------------
active file
= file attivo , fascicolo attivo ,
---------------
active ingredient
= principio attivo ,
---------------
active market
= mercato attivo ,
---------------
active money
= denaro attivo ,
---------------
active role
= ruolo attivo ,
---------------
active service
= servizio attivo , servizio permanente effettivo ,
---------------
active support
= sostegno attivo ,
---------------
active trade balance
= bilancia commerciale in attivo ,
---------------
active trade balances
= bilance commerciali in attivo ,
---------------
active trust
= fedecommesso attivo ,
---------------
active vocabulary
= vocabolario attivo , lessico attivo ,
---------------
active volcano
= vulcano attivo ,
---------------
activize
= attivare , rendere attivo ,
---------------
activized
= attivato , reso attivo ,
---------------
activizes
= attiva , rende attivo ,
---------------
activizing
= attivando , rendendo attivo ,
---------------
aggressive
= aggressivo , litigioso , energico , intraprendente , attivo , grintoso , offensivo ,
---------------
alive
= vivo , in vita , in vigore , vivace , vitale , pronto , attivo , conscio , consapevole , vibrante , in atto , in tensione , brulicante ,
---------------
alte kacker
= vecchio ripugnante e libidinoso , anziano attivo e sveglio ,
---------------
alter cocker
= vecchio ripugnante e libidinoso , anziano attivo e sveglio ,
---------------
alter kocker
= vecchio ripugnante e libidinoso , anziano attivo e sveglio ,
---------------
anybody would think you were deaf
= chiunque penserebbe che tu sia sordo ,
---------------
anyone would think you were deaf
= chiunque penserebbe che tu sia sordo ,
---------------
as quick as thought
= rapido come il pensiero ,
---------------
as though
= come se , quasi , che ,
---------------
assets
= beni , pregi , doni , qualità , attività , attivo , avere , patrimonio ,
---------------
assets account
= conto attivo ,
---------------
assets and liabilities
= attivo e passivo , attività e passività , avere e dare ,
---------------
assets side
= colonna delle attività , parte dell'avere , attivo , lato dell'attivo , attività ,
---------------
available assets
= liquidità , disponibilità , attivo disponibile , disponibilità finanziarie , attività disponibili ,
---------------
balance of payments surplus
= eccedenza della bilancia dei pagamenti , saldo attivo con l'estero ,
---------------
balance the accounts with a profit
= chiudere un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balance the books in the black
= chiudere un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balanced the accounts with a profit
= chiuso un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balanced the books in the black
= chiuso un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balances the accounts with a profit
= chiude un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balances the books in the black
= chiude un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balancing the accounts with a profit
= chiudendo un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
balancing the books in the black
= chiudendo un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
banish all thoughts of winter
= cacciare via i pensieri tristi ,
---------------
banished all thoughts of winter
= cacciato via i pensieri tristi ,
---------------
banishes all thoughts of winter
= caccia via i pensieri tristi ,
---------------
banishing all thoughts of winter
= cacciando via i pensieri tristi ,
---------------
bank leading rate
= tasso attivo bancario ,
---------------
bankruptcy assets
= attivo fallimentare , massa attiva nel fallimento , attività del fallimento ,
---------------
be a thought more careful
= sta' un po' più attento! ,
---------------
bean-fed
= assai attivo , energico , euforico ,
---------------
big trade
= commercio attivo ,
---------------
book debt
= debito attivo , credito chirografario ,
---------------
brisk
= vivace , attivo , vispo , veloce , animato , intenso , forte , corroborante , frizzante , rendere vivace , rendere forte , ravvivare , rianimare ,
---------------
brisk market
= mercato attivo ,
---------------
buried in thought
= assorto nei propri pensieri ,
---------------
busy
= occupato , attivo , indaffarato , affaccendato , laborioso , irrequieto , sempre in moto , che si fa avanti a gomitate , vivace , pieno d'attività , che ha molto lavoro , che ha un traffico intenso , tenere occupato , tenere impegnato ,
---------------
can you think of anyplace he might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anyplace she might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anywhere he might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
can you think of anywhere she might be
= ti viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? vi viene in mente qualche posto in cui potrebbe essere? ,
---------------
cash assets
= attivo liquido, attivo di cassa ,
---------------
ci 77266
= carbone attivo fu polvere, carbone attivo granulare ,
---------------
close a balance in the black
= chiudere un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
closed a balance in the black
= chiuso un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
closes a balance in the black
= chiude un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
closing a balance in the black
= chiudendo un bilancio in attivo ,
---------------
company's assets
= attivo sociale ,
---------------
corporate assets
= attivo sociale, patrimonio societario ,
---------------
credit balance
= saldo a credito, saldo creditore, differenza a credito, saldo attivo ,
---------------
deep in thought
= immerso nei propri pensieri ,
---------------
depth of thought
= profondità di pensiero ,
---------------
depths of thought
= profondità di pensiero ,
---------------
do as you think best
= fa' come credi! ,
---------------
do you think you can compass it by yourself
= credi di farcela da solo? ,
---------------
don't give it a moment's thought
= non farci caso! non curartene! ,
---------------
don't think badly of me
= non pensare male di me ,
---------------
drool at the thought of
= impazzire al pensiero di , sbavare al pensiero di ,
---------------
drooled at the thought of
= impazzito al pensiero di , sbavato al pensiero di ,
---------------
drooling at the thought of
= impazzendo al pensiero di , sbavando al pensiero di ,
---------------
drools at the thought of
= impazzisce al pensiero di , sbava al pensiero di ,
---------------
favourable balance of payments
= bilancia dei pagamenti in attivo ,
---------------
favourable balances of payments
= bilance dei pagamenti in attivo ,
---------------
favourable trade balance
= saldo attivo nella bilancia commerciale ,
---------------
i can't bear the thought of
= non posso sopportare l'idea di,
---------------
i think we're on to something big
= penso che stiamo per scoprire qualcosa di grosso,
---------------
i think we've had the best of the day
= penso che per oggi abbiamo fatto tanto,
---------------
i thought as much
= lo dicevo io! me l'aspettavo! era come pensavo!,
---------------
illiquid assets
= illiquidità, attivo non disponibile,
---------------
in pocket
= con quattrini, in attivo, in attivo in un affare,
---------------
liquid assets
= liquidità, attivo disponibile, disponibilità finanziarie,
---------------
on active service
= in servizio attivo , in zona d'operazioni ,
---------------
politically active
= attivo in politica,
---------------
sprier
= più animato - attivo - energico - vivace ,
---------------
spriest
= il più animato - attivo - energico - vivace ,
---------------
spry
= animato , attivo , energico , vivace ,
---------------
spryer
= più animato - attivo - energico - vivace ,
---------------
spryest
= il più animato - attivo - energico - vivace ,
---------------
spryly
= in modo animato - attivo - energico - vivace ,
---------------
stirring
= eccitante , emozionante , commovente , stimolante , attivo , agitazione ,
---------------
stirringly
= in modo eccitante - emozionante - commovente - stimolante - attivo ,
---------------
strenuous
= strenuo , energico , attivo , efficace , intenso , arduo , duro , stancante ,
---------------
strenuously
= in modo strenuo - energico - attivo - efficace - intenso - arduo - duro ,
---------------
surplus
= sovrappiù , eccesso , eccedenza , avanzo , residuo attivo , riserva ,
---------------
unavailable assets
= attivo non disponibile ,
---------------
up and going
= attivo ,
---------------
vespertine
= vespertino , attivo di sera , notturno ,
---------------
Coniugazione:1 - ideare
Ausiliare:avere transitivo
INDICATIVO - attivo
Presente
io ideo
tu idei
egli idea
noi ideiamo
voi ideate
essi ideano
Imperfetto
io ideavo
tu ideavi
egli ideava
noi ideavamo
voi ideavate
essi ideavano
Passato remoto
io ideai
tu ideasti
egli ideò
noi ideammo
voi ideaste
essi idearono
Passato prossimo
io ho ideato
tu hai ideato
egli ha ideato
noi abbiamo ideato
voi avete ideato
essi hanno ideato
Trapassato prossimo
io avevo ideato
tu avevi ideato
egli aveva ideato
noi avevamo ideato
voi avevate ideato
essi avevano ideato
Trapassato remoto
io ebbi ideato
tu avesti ideato
egli ebbe ideato
noi avemmo ideato
voi eveste ideato
essi ebbero ideato
Futuro semplice
io ideerò
tu ideerai
egli ideerà
noi ideeremo
voi ideerete
essi ideeranno
Futuro anteriore
io avrò ideato
tu avrai ideato
egli avrà ideato
noi avremo ideato
voi avrete ideato
essi avranno ideato
CONGIUNTIVO - attivo
Presente
che io idei
che tu idei
che egli idei
che noi ideiamo
che voi ideiate
che essi ideino
Passato
che io abbia ideato
che tu abbia ideato
che egli abbia ideato
che noi abbiamo ideato
che voi abbiate ideato
che essi abbiano ideato
Imperfetto
che io ideassi
che tu ideassi
che egli ideasse
che noi ideassimo
che voi ideaste
che essi ideassero
Trapassato
che io avessi ideato
che tu avessi ideato
che egli avesse ideato
che noi avessimo ideato
che voi aveste ideato
che essi avessero ideato
CONDIZIONALE - attivo
Presente
io ideerei
tu ideeresti
egli ideerebbe
noi ideeremmo
voi ideereste
essi ideerebbero
Passato
io avrei ideato
tu avresti ideato
egli avrebbe ideato
noi avremmo ideato
voi avreste ideato
essi avrebbero ideato
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - attivo
Presente
-
idea
idei
ideiamo
ideate
ideino
Futuro
-
ideerai
ideerà
ideeremo
ideerete
ideeranno
INFINITO - attivo
Presente
ideare
Passato
avere ideato
PARTICIPIO - attivo
Presente
ideante
Passato
ideato
 
 
GERUNDIO - attivo
Presente
ideando
Passato
avendo ideato
INDICATIVO - passivo
Presente
io sono ideato
tu sei ideato
egli é ideato
noi siamo ideati
voi siete ideati
essi sono ideati
Imperfetto
io ero ideato
tu eri ideato
egli era ideato
noi eravamo ideati
voi eravate ideati
essi erano ideati
Passato remoto
io fui ideato
tu fosti ideato
egli fu ideato
noi fummo ideati
voi foste ideati
essi furono ideati
Passato prossimo
io sono stato ideato
tu sei stato ideato
egli é stato ideato
noi siamo stati ideati
voi siete stati ideati
essi sono stati ideati
Trapassato prossimo
io ero stato ideato
tu eri stato ideato
egli era stato ideato
noi eravamo stati ideati
voi eravate stati ideati
essi erano statiideati
Trapassato remoto
io fui stato ideato
tu fosti stato ideato
egli fu stato ideato
noi fummo stati ideati
voi foste stati ideati
essi furono stati ideati
Futuro semplice
io sarò ideato
tu sarai ideato
egli sarà ideato
noi saremo ideati
voi sarete ideati
essi saranno ideati
Futuro anteriore
io sarò stato ideato
tu sarai stato ideato
egli sarà stato ideato
noi saremo stati ideati
voi sarete stati ideati
essi saranno stati ideati
CONGIUNTIVO - passivo
Presente
che io sia ideato
che tu sia ideato
che egli sia ideato
che noi siamo ideati
che voi siate ideati
che essi siano ideati
Passato
che io sia stato ideato
che tu sia stato ideato
che egli sia stato ideato
che noi siamo stati ideati
che voi siate stati ideati
che essi siano stati ideati
Imperfetto
che io fossi ideato
che tu fossi ideato
che egli fosse ideato
che noi fossimo ideati
che voi foste ideati
che essi fossero ideati
Trapassato
che io fossi stato ideato
che tu fossi stato ideato
che egli fosse stato ideato
che noi fossimo stati ideati
che voi foste stati ideati
che essi fossero stati ideati
CONDIZIONALE - passivo
Presente
io sarei ideato
tu saresti ideato
egli sarebbe ideato
noi saremmo ideati
voi sareste ideati
essi sarebbero ideati
Passato
io sarei stato ideato
tu saresti stato ideato
egli sarebbe stato ideato
noi saremmo stati ideati
voi sareste stati ideati
essi sarebbero stati ideati
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
IMPERATIVO - passivo
Presente
-
sii ideato
sia ideato
siamo ideati
siate ideati
siano ideati
Futuro
-
sarai ideato
sarà ideato
saremo ideati
sarete ideati
saranno ideati
INFINITO - passivo
Presente
essere ideato
Passato
essere stato ideato
PARTICIPIO - passivo
Presente
-
Passato
ideato
 
 
GERUNDIO - passivo
Presente
essendo ideato
Passato
essendo stato ideato
Verb: to think-thought-thought
Ausiliar: to have - transitivo/intransitivo
Affermative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I think up
you think up
he/she/it thinks up
we think up
you think up
they think up
Simple past
I thought up
you thought up
he/she/it thought up
we thought up
you thought up
they thought up
Simple past
I thought up
you thought up
he/she/it thought up
we thought up
you thought up
they thought up
Present perfect
I have thought up
you have thought up
he/she/it has thought up
we have thought up
you have thought up
they have thought up
Past perfect
I had thought up
you had thought up
he/she/it had thought up
we had thought up
you had thought up
they had thought up
Past perfect
I had thought up
you had thought up
he/she/it had thought up
we had thought up
you had thought up
they had thought up
Simple future
I I will think up
you you will think up
he/she/it he/she/it will think up
we we will think up
you I will think up
they they will think up
Future perfect
I will have thought up
you will have thought up
he/she/it will have thought up
we will have thought up
you will have thought up
they will have thought up
Present continuous
I am thinking up
you are thinking up
he/she/it is thinking up
we are thinking up
you are thinking up
they are thinking up
Past simple continuous
I was thinking up
you were thinking up
he/she/it was thinking up
we were thinking up
you were thinking up
they were thinking up
Future continuous
I will be thinking up
you will be thinking up
he/she/it will be thinking up
we will be thinking up
you will be thinking up
they will be thinking up
Future perfect continuous
I will have been thinking up
you will have been thinking up
he/she/it will have been thinking up
we will have been thinking up
you will have been thinking up
they will have been thinking up
Present perfect continuous
I have been thinking up
you have been thinking up
he/she/it has been thinking up
we have been thinking up
you have been thinking up
they have been thinking up
Past perfect continuous
I had been thinking up
you had been thinking up
he/she/it had been thinking up
we had been thinking up
you had been thinking up
they had been thinking up
Affermative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I think up
That you think up
That he/she/it think up
That we think up
That you think up
That they think up
Present perfect
That I have thought up
That you have thought up
That he/she/it have thought up
That we have thought up
That you have thought up
That they have thought up
Simple past
That I thought up
That you thought up
That he/she/it thought up
That we thought up
That you thought up
That they thought up
Past perfect
That I had thought up
That you had thought up
That he/she/it had thought up
That we had thought up
That you had thought up
That they had thought up
Affermative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would think up
you would think up
we would think up
we would think up
you would think up
they would think up
Past
I would have thought
you would have thought
he/she/it would have thought
we would have thought
you would have thought
they would have thought
Present continous
I would be thinking up
you would be thinking up
we would be thinking up
we would be thinking up
you would be thinking up
they would be thinking up
Past continous
I would have been thinking
you would have been thinking
he/she/it would have been thinking
we would have been thinking
you would have been thinking
they would have been thinking
Affermative - IMPERATIVE
Present
let me think up
think up
let him think up
let us think up
think up
let them think up
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Affermative - INFINITIVE
Present
to think
Past
to have thought
Present continous
to be thinking
Perfect continous
to have been thinking
Affermative - PARTICIPLE
Present
thinking
Past
thought
Perfect
having thought
Affermative - GERUND
Present
thinking
Past
having thought
Passive - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I am thought up
you are thought up
he/she/it is thought up
we are thought up
you are thought up
they are thought up
Past simple
I was thought up
you were thought up
he/she/it was thought up
we were thought up
you were thought up
they were thought up
Past simple
I was thought up
you were thought up
he/she/it was thought up
we were thought up
you were thought up
they were thought up
Present perfect
I have been thought up
you have been thought up
he/she/it has been thought up
we have been thought up
you have been thought up
they have been thought up
Past perfect
I had been thought up
you had been thought up
he/she/it had been thought up
we had been thought up
you had been thought up
they had been thought up
Past perfect
I had been thought up
you had been thought up
he/she/it had been thought up
we had been thought up
you had been thought up
they had been thought up
Future simple
I will be thought up
you will be thought up
he/she/it will be thought up
we will be thought up
you will be thought up
they will be thought up
Future perfect
I will have been thought up
you will have been thought up
he/she/it will have been thought up
we will have been thought up
you will have been thought up
they will have been thought up
Present continuous
I am being thought up
you are being thought up
he/she/it is being thought up
we are being thought up
you are being thought up
they are being thought up
Past simple continuous
I was being thought up
you were being thought up
he/she/it was being thought up
were being thought up
you were being thought up
they were being thought up
Future continuous
I will being thought up
you will being thought up
he/she/it will being thought up
we will being thought up
you will being thought up
they will being thought up
Future perfect continuous
I will have been thought up
you will have been thought up
he/she/it will have been thought up
we will have been thought up
you will have been thought up
they will have been thought up
Present perfect continuous
I have been thought up
you have been thought up
he/she/it has been thought up
we have been thought up
you have been thought up
they have been thought up
Past perfect continuous
I had been thought up
you had been thought up
he/she/it had been thought up
we had been thought up
you had been thought up
they had been thought up
Passive - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I be thought up
That you be thought up
That he/she/it be thought up
That we be thought up
That you be thought up
That they be thought up
Present perfect
That I have been thought up
That you have been thought up
That he/she/it have been thought up
That we have been thought up
That you have been thought up
That they have been thought up
Simple past
That I were thought up
That you were thought up
That he/she/it were thought up
That we were thought up
That you were thought up
That they were thought up
Past perfect
That I had been thought up
That you had been thought up
That he/she/it had been thought up
That we had been thought up
That you had been thought up
That they had been thought up
CONDITIONAL
Present
I would be thought
you would be thought
we would be thought
we would be thought
you would be thought
they would be thought
Past
I would have been thought
you would have been thought
he/she/it would have been thought
we would have been thought
you would have been thought
they would have been thought
IMPERATIVE
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
INFINITIVE
Present
to be thought
Past
to have been thought
PARTICIPLE
Present
being thought
Past
thought
Perfect
having been thought
GERUND
Present
being thought
Past
having been thought
Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
I do not think up
you do not think up
he/she/it does not thinks up
we do not think up
you do not think up
they do not think up
Simple past
I did not think up
you did not think up
he/she/it did not think up
we did not think up
you did not think up
they did not think up
Simple past
I did not think up
you did not think up
he/she/it did not think up
we did not think up
you did not think up
they did not think up
Present perfect
I have not thought up
you have not thought up
he/she/it has not thought up
we have not thought up
you have not thought up
they have not thought up
Past perfect
I had not thought up
you had not thought up
he/she/it had not thought up
we had not thought up
you had not thought up
they had not thought up
Past perfect
I had not thought up
you had not thought up
he/she/it had not thought up
we had not thought up
you had not thought up
they had not thought up
Simple future
I I will not think up
you you will not think up
he/she/it he/she/it will not think up
we we will not think up
you I will not think up
they they will not think up
Future perfect
I will not have thought up
you will not have thought up
he/she/it will not have thought up
we will not have thought up
you will not have thought up
they will not have thought up
Present continuous
I am not thinking up
you are not thinking up
he/she/it is not thinking up
we are not thinking up
you are not thinking up
they are not thinking up
Past simple continuous
I was not thinking up
you were not thinking up
he/she/it was not thinking up
we were not thinking up
you were not thinking up
they were not thinking up
Future continuous
I will not be thinking up
you will not be thinking up
he/she/it will not be thinking up
we will not be thinking up
you will not be thinking up
they will not be thinking up
Future perfect continuous
I will not have been thinking up
you will not have been thinking up
he/she/it will not have been thinking up
we will not have been thinking up
you will not have been thinking up
they will not have been thinking up
Present perfect continuous
I have not been thinking up
you have not been thinking up
he/she/it has not been thinking up
we have not been thinking up
you have not been thinking up
they have not been thinking up
Past perfect continuous
I had not been thinking up
you had not been thinking up
he/she/it had not been thinking up
we had not been thinking up
you had not been thinking up
they had not been thinking up
Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That I do not think up
That you do not think up
That he/she/it does not think up
That we do not think up
That you do not think up
That they do not think up
Present perfect
That I have not thought up
That you have not thought up
That he/she/it have not thought up
That we have not thought up
That you have not thought up
That they have not thought up
Simple past
That I did not think up
That you did not think up
That he/she/it did not think up
That we did not think up
That you did not think up
That they did not think up
Past perfect
That I had not thought up
That you had not thought up
That he/she/it had not thought up
That we had not thought up
That you had not thought up
That they had not thought up
Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
I would not think up
you would not think up
we would not think up
we would not think up
you would not think up
they would not think up
Past
I would not have thought
you would not have thought
he/she/it would not have thought
we would not have thought
you would not have thought
they would not have thought
Present continous
I would not be thinking up
you would not be thinking up
we would not be thinking up
we would not be thinking up
you would not be thinking up
they would not be thinking up
Past continous
I would not have been thinking
you would not have been thinking
he/she/it would not have been thinking
we would not have been thinking
you would not have been thinking
they would not have been thinking
Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present
do not let me think up
do not think up
do not let him think up
do not let us think up
do not think up
do not let them think up
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Negative - INFINITIVE
Present
not to think
Past
not to have thought
Present continous
not to be thinking
Perfect continous
not to have been thinking
Negative - PARTICIPLE
Present
not thinking
Past
not thought
Perfect
not having thought
Negative - GERUND
Present
not thinking
Past
not having thought
Interrogative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I think up?
do you think up?
does she/he/it thinks up?
do we think up?
do you think up?
do they think up?
Simple past
did I think up?
did you think up?
did she/he/it think up?
did we think up?
did you think up?
did they think up?
Simple past
did I think up?
did you think up?
did she/he/it think up?
did we think up?
did you think up?
did they think up?
Present perfect
have I thought up?
have you thought up?
has she/he/it thought up?
have we thought up?
have you thought up?
have they thought up?
Past perfect
had I thought up?
had you thought up?
had she/he/it thought up?
had we thought up?
had you thought up?
had they thought up?
Past perfect
had I thought up?
had you thought up?
had she/he/it thought up?
had we thought up?
had you thought up?
had they thought up?
Simple future
will I think up?
will you think up?
will she/he/it think up?
will we think up?
will I think up?
will they think up?
Future perfect
will I have thought up?
will you have thought up?
will she/he/it have thought up?
will we have thought up?
will you have thought up?
will they have thought up?
Present continuous
am I thinking up?
are you thinking up?
is she/he/it thinking up?
are we thinking up?
are you thinking up?
are they thinking up?
Past simple continuous
was I thinking up?
were you thinking up?
was she/he/it thinking up?
were we thinking up?
were you thinking up?
were they thinking up?
Future continuous
will I be thinking up?
will you be thinking up?
will she/he/it be thinking up?
will we be thinking up?
will you be thinking up?
will they be thinking up?
Future perfect continuous
will I have been thinking up?
will you have been thinking up?
will she/he/it have been thinking up?
will we have been thinking up?
will you have been thinking up?
will they have been thinking up?
Present perfect continuous
have I been thinking up?
have you been thinking up?
has she/he/it been thinking up?
have we been thinking up?
have you been thinking up?
have they been thinking up?
Past perfect continuous
had I been thinking up?
had you been thinking up?
had she/he/it been thinking up?
had we been thinking up?
had you been thinking up?
had they been thinking up?
Interrogative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I think up?
That do you think up?
That does she/he/it think up?
That do we think up?
That do you think up?
That do they think up?
Present perfect
That have I thought up?
That have you thought up?
That have she/he/it thought up?
That have we thought up?
That have you thought up?
That have they thought up?
Simple past
That did I think up?
That did you think up?
That did she/he/it think up?
That did we think up?
That did you think up?
That did they think up?
Past perfect
That had I thought up?
That had you thought up?
That had she/he/it thought up?
That had we thought up?
That had you thought up?
That had they thought up?
Interrogative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I think up?
would you think up?
would she/he/it think up?
would we think up?
would you think up?
would they think up?
Past
would I have thought?
would you have thought?
would she/he/it have thought?
would we have thought?
would you have thought?
would they have thought?
Present continous
would I be thinking up?
would you be thinking up?
would she/he/it be thinking up?
would we be thinking up?
would you be thinking up?
would they be thinking up?
Past continous
would I have been thinking?
would you have been thinking?
would she/he/it have been thinking?
would we have been thinking?
would you have been thinking?
would they have been thinking?
Interrogative - IMPERATIVE
Present
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Interrogative-Negative - INDICATIVE
Present simple
do I not think up?
do you not think up?
does she/he/it not thinks up?
do we not think up?
do you not think up?
do they not think up?
Simple past
did I not think up?
did you not think up?
did she/he/it not think up?
did we not think up?
did you not think up?
did they not think up?
Simple past
did I not think up?
did you not think up?
did she/he/it not think up?
did we not think up?
did you not think up?
did they not think up?
Present perfect
have I not thought up?
have you not thought up?
has she/he/it not thought up?
have we not thought up?
have you not thought up?
have they not thought up?
Past perfect
had I not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had she/he/it not thought up?
had we not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had they not thought up?
Past perfect
had I not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had she/he/it not thought up?
had we not thought up?
had you not thought up?
had they not thought up?
Simple future
will I not think up?
will you not think up?
will she/he/it not think up?
will we not think up?
will I not think up?
will they not think up?
Future perfect
will I not have thought up?
will you not have thought up?
will she/he/it not have thought up?
will we not have thought up?
will you not have thought up?
will they not have thought up?
Present continuous
am I not thinking up?
are you not thinking up?
is she/he/it not thinking up?
are we not thinking up?
are you not thinking up?
are they not thinking up?
Past simple continuous
was I not thinking up?
were you not thinking up?
was she/he/it not thinking up?
were we not thinking up?
were you not thinking up?
were they not thinking up?
Future continuous
will I not be thinking up?
will you not be thinking up?
will she/he/it not be thinking up?
will we not be thinking up?
will you not be thinking up?
will they not be thinking up?
Future perfect continuous
will I not have been thinking up?
will you not have been thinking up?
will she/he/it not have been thinking up?
will we not have been thinking up?
will you not have been thinking up?
will they not have been thinking up?
Present perfect continuous
have I not been thinking up?
have you not been thinking up?
has she/he/it not been thinking up?
have we not been thinking up?
have you not been thinking up?
have they not been thinking up?
Past perfect continuous
had I not been thinking up?
had you not been thinking up?
had she/he/it not been thinking up?
had we not been thinking up?
had you not been thinking up?
had they not been thinking up?
Interrogative-Negative - SUBJUNCTIVE
Present simple
That do I not think up?
That do you not think up?
That does she/he/it not think up?
That do we not think up?
That do you not think up?
That do they not think up?
Present perfect
That have I not thought up?
That have you not thought up?
That have she/he/it not thought up?
That have we not thought up?
That have you not thought up?
That have they not thought up?
Simple past
That did I not think up?
That did you not think up?
That did she/he/it not think up?
That did we not think up?
That did you not think up?
That did they not think up?
Past perfect
That had I not thought up?
That had you not thought up?
That had she/he/it not thought up?
That had we not thought up?
That had you not thought up?
That had they not thought up?
Interrogative-Negative - CONDITIONAL
Present
would I not think up?
would you not think up?
would she/he/it not think up?
would we not think up?
would you not think up?
would they not think up?
Past
would I not have thought?
would you not have thought?
would she/he/it not have thought?
would we not have thought?
would you not have thought?
would they not have thought?
Present continous
would I not be thinking up?
would you not be thinking up?
would she/he/it not be thinking up?
would we not be thinking up?
would you not be thinking up?
would they not be thinking up?
Past continous
would I not have been thinking?
would you not have been thinking?
would she/he/it not have been thinking?
would we not have been thinking?
would you not have been thinking?
would they not have been thinking?
Interrogative-Negative - IMPERATIVE
Present